Learning Environments Grant

ctlThrough the awarding of small grants, the Learning Environments Grant (LEG) supports the creation of innovative, engaging formal and informal learning environments that meet the needs of both faculty and students.

Proposals will be ranked on the following criterion:

1. The project must have a demonstrable positive impact on learning
2. The number of students who will benefit
3. The project must enable new/critical academic experiences for faculty and/or students
4. The creativity of projects
5. The project provides opportunities for faculty-student/student-student interaction
6. Availability of any additional needed funds
7. Plans/funds should be in place for repairs and maintenance of all items purchased

*Areas renovated within the past 10 years are not eligible to receive this grant.

Submission:

Should you have any questions about the online submission process please call the Center for Teaching and Learning at (317) 274-1300 or email thectl@iupui.edu. Proposals are due Friday, October 17

Past Projects

2013–2014

  • Classroom Furniture – ES 2104 ($12,416)
  • Classroom Furniture – BS 2006 ($12,416)
  • Building the Flipped Classroom: Designing a Collaborative Workspace for Active Learning - ET 329 ($25,000)
  • School of Education Multipurpose Learning Spaces – ES First Floor ($25,000)
  • I-Learn (Informatics – Learn, Engage, Apply, Reflect, Network): A Collaborative Space for Informatics – IT 592 ($25,000)
  • Creating a small class/meeting/study room for the Economics graduate programs – CA 536A ($8,700)

2012–2013

  • Leadership Learning Lab: Enhancing Technology for Collaborative Teaching and Learning / ET 327OLS ($22,389)
  • Geography Learning Lab and Seminar Room / CA 209 Renovation ($24,939)
  • Renovation for Laboratory Classes / SL 008 ($25,109)
  • Engaging the World Through the Global Crossroads Classroom / ES 2132 ($25,000)
  • Designing Spaces for Project and Problem Based Learning for Art Education and Community Arts Programs / Herron 147 and 151 ($23,240)
  • Cavanaugh Hall Classroom Furniture / CA 215 ($24,696)

2011–2012

  • Classroom Furniture – LD 002 ($12,519.12)
  • Classroom Furniture – LD 004 ($12,190.72)
  • Scale Up Classroom in Psychology ($25,000)
  • Literacy Studies (Cavanaugh 347/349) ($25,000)
  • “PhyLS” – A Physics Learning Space ($13,939.83)
  • Taking 2110 into the 21st Century ($25,000)
  • Creating a technology-enhanced collaborative learning space for IUPUC Students ($25,000)
  • Musculoskeletal Learning Lab (PE0005) $15,895.08)

2010–2011

  • Classroom Furniture – ET 302, 304 ($25,000)
  • Classroom Furniture – ET 308 ($10,470.68)
  • SHRS Student Learning and Research Facilitation Lab ($24,991.50)
  • ES 2101 Classroom redesign and technology upgrade ($25,000)
  • CSL & OSE Enhanced Learning Space – BS 2010A ($25,000)
  • Cavanaugh 435 – An environment for global and civically engaged learning ($25,000)

2009–2010 Projects

  • PETM Multipurpose Learning Lab ($21,700)
  • Biology Resource Center ($25,000)
  • University Library International Newsroom ($25,000)
  • E&T Student Council ($16,212.45)
  • Spanish Resource Center ($19,000)
  • Informatics MARLA Lab ($25,000)

2008–2009 Projects

  • Psychology Resource Center ($20,875)
  • University Library International Newsroom/University Library Reference Area ($20,000)
  • School of Liberal Arts and Science Multipurpose/Performance Auditorium ($25,000)
  • Community Learning Network/Union Building Learning Spaces ($22,000)
  • New furnishings for room BS 3006 ($23,315)
  • New furnishings for room LD020 ($18,333)

Eligibility

Schools and departments at IUPUI and IUPUC are eligible for the LEG.  Registered student groups may also apply.

Full details can be found here

Library dean’s ‘landmark’ article chosen for College & Research Libraries 75th anniversary issue

205249_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Readers of College & Research Libraries have selected an article written by IUPUI University Library Dean David W. Lewis as one of seven “landmark” articles to be published in a special journal for the association’s 75th anniversary.

Originally published in July 1988, Lewis’ article “Inventing the Electronic University” foreshadowed many of the key technologies, such as the digital collection, that University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the campus are leveraging today to effectively engage with students and the wider community.

Lewis argued that the rapid evolution of information technology employed in teaching, learning and research presages a “fundamental change” in higher education that will require academic libraries to be less concerned with “the automation of old systems” and more concerned with the “restructuring of institutions.”

“David Lewis’ innovation and leadership have a lasting legacy in IUPUI’s pioneering efforts to integrate information technology across the academic enterprise, especially in University Library,” said Nasser Paydar, executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “He is most deserving of this recognition as a national thought-leader and author from College & Research Libraries’ 75-year history.”

Lewis is also Indiana University assistant vice president for digital scholarly communication and as such has responsibility for advancing the university’s  efforts to foster open access to scholarly research by developing new models for scholarly publication that enable scholars, and their collective communities, to re-assert control over rights to scholarship literature.

In March, the editorial board and past editors of College & Research Libraries identified 30 articles from the journal’s history, including Lewis’, as finalists for publication in the special issue scheduled for March 2015. Readers were asked to select six articles from the 30, plus a reader’s choice, for publication.

College & Research Libraries is the official scholarly research journal of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association. More than 300 readers voted on the landmark articles. The chosen articles will also be a topic for discussion at the Association of College Research Libraries 2015 Conference in Portland, Ore.

“Reviewing every article published in the journal since 1939 reminded the editorial board of the incredible contributions that our authors have made to research and practice in academic librarianship over the past 75 years, and we are looking forward to reflecting on those contributions and considering what they mean for the future of research in our field with the publication of this special issue in March 2015,” said C&RL Editor Scott Walter of DePaul University.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Rachel Armstrong to Deliver Lecture at the Indianapolis Museum of Art on October 30

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Indianapolis Museum of Art will co-sponsor a free public lecture on “living architecture” by TED Fellow Rachel Armstrong on October 30 at 7pm. The event, part of the IAHI’s Lecture & Performance Series and the IMA’s STEM to STEAM Lecture Series, will take place at 7pm in the DeBoest Lecture Hall at the IMA. Reserve your free tickets below.

Rachel Armstrong is Co-Director of AVATAR (Advanced Virtual and Technological Architectural Research) in Architecture & Synthetic Biology at The School of Architecture & Construction, University of Greenwich, London. Senior TED Fellow, and Visiting Research Assistant at the Centre for Fundamental Living Technology, Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark. Rachel is a sustainability innovator who investigates a new approach to building materials called ‘living architecture,’ that suggests it is possible for our buildings to share some of the properties of living systems. She works collaboratively across disciplines to build and develop prototypes that embody her approach.

Dr. Armstrong was a member of the RESCUE “Collaboration between the natural, social and human sciences in global change research” Working Group, an interdisciplinary body of European experts making recommendations to the EU for strategic investment in interdisciplinary/scientific research of climate change. She was also part of the TARPOL report Targeting environmental pollution with engineered microbial systems, for the European Commission which will be published by Wiley this year. In 2011 Rachel was named as one of the top ten UK innovators by Director Magazine, featured in the top ten ‘big ideas, 10 original thinkers’ for BBC Focus Magazine, and selected as one of BMW/Wired’s Change Accelerators. She has also just released a TED Book on Living Architecture.

“Scientists need to work outside their own areas of expertise to make new technologies that are pertinent to the 21st century and to collaborate, both with other scientific disciplines and the arts and humanities.”

Rachel Armstrong

Dr. Armstrong innovates and designs sustainable solutions for the built and natural environment using advanced new technologies such as, Synthetic Biology – the rational engineering of living systems – and smart chemistry. Her research prompts a reevaluation of how we think about our homes and cities and raises questions about sustainable development of the built environment. She creates open innovation platforms for academia and industry to address environmental challenges such as carbon capture & recycling, smart ‘living’ materials and sustainable design.

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Dr. Armstrong’s work includes the study of protocells.  Protocells are a form of organic hardware that is not technically ‘alive’ since they do not possess any DNA. Yet they are capable of life-like behaviour that draws from the self-organizing potential of their ingredients. In keeping with Stuart Kauffman’s notion of ‘order for free,’ the protocells are equipped with remarkable, emergent properties such as, movement, sensitivity and the production of microstructures.

While protocells have numerous engineering applications, which Dr. Armstrong explains in this short video, ‘Toward a Living Architecture’.

Dr. Armstrong is also interested in investigating the artistic potential of new materials, working collaboratively with specialists in the arts and humanities.  With the architect Philip Beesley and the cybernetic engineer Rob Gorbet, she participated in the Hylozoic Ground installation shown at the Venice Biennale in 2010. The group enlarged protocells and encased them in flasks, which were distributed throughout a lattice of small transparent acrylic meshwork designed by Beesley and Gorbet. The protocells performed like smell and taste receptors, sensing carbon dioxide produced by people in the gallery. When carbon dioxide was present, the protocells changed from blue to green or pink to purple.  See a video of the installation here:

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In addition to her other accomplishments, Dr. Armstrong has given a number of TED and TEDx talks.  Her talk, “Architecture that Repairs Itself,” will be featured at TEDxIndianapolis on October 22.

TEDFellows Talk: Creating Carbon Negative Architecture

 

TEDFellows Talk: Architecture that Repairs Itself

 

Get you free tickets to see Rachel Armstrong’s lecture on October 30 at 7pm at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.