Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School The Glick Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), has made a $17,850 gift to Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School Program. One of the Glick Fund’s target areas is the arts and creative expression. Herron was one of 49 local organizations in the Fund’s latest round of grants, announced in mid-November, which totaled more than $4 million.

Last spring, 43 students requested tuition aid to attend Herron’s Saturday School. Only two scholarships were available. “This gift will help us better serve students in grades six through 12 from IPS and Wayne and Warren township schools,” said Jodie Hardy, director of community learning programs at Herron. The Glick Fund gift will provide scholarships for up to 70 students. Registration is already underway for spring 2014 Saturday School, which runs January 25 through March 15. Each class session is three hours. Tuition is $255 per student per eight-week session.

“We hope our grants will help address the immediate needs of the community while also building the long-term capacity of the organizations delivering services,” said Marianne Glick, director at the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation and The Glick Fund.

About Saturday School
Saturday School student from 2012

Saturday School student from 2012.

Established in 1922, Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School program provides quality art instruction for youth and adults for eight Saturdays each fall and spring.

Classes offer a variety of media—painting, ceramics, drawing, photography and more. Students’ ages range from second graders to high school seniors. Classes are also open to adults, allowing families to enjoy creating together. The average student is a creative junior high or high school student interested in discovering more about art and design while learning within a fun, safe and professional environment. Classes are taught by Herron’s degree-seeking students and take place in excellent studio facilities, giving many younger students their first exposure to a university environment.

Each semester concludes with an open house exhibition, reception and awards ceremony.

About the Glick Fund:

The Glick Fund is a donor-advised fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation. It was established by Eugene and Marilyn Glick in 1998 to support a variety of causes. Grants are awarded by invitation only, with no unsolicited grant applications accepted.

The Glick Fund also strives to align with the Central Indiana Community Foundation’s three broader community leadership initiatives of: Family Success & Making Connections; Inspiring Places; and College Readiness & Success – initiatives aimed at making central Indiana one of the best places in the nation to live, work and raise a family. To date, The Glick Fund has awarded over $49 million in grants to not-for-profit organizations. For more information, please visit the Central Indiana Community Foundation website.

Herron well-represented in upcoming Indiana State Museum’s exhibit “Fearless Furniture”

Nearly 85 percent of Indiana’s dentists were trained on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. Nearly half of the state’s lawyers have their legal roots on the IUPUI campus. Now an upcoming museum exhibit reveals many of the state’s “best of the best” furniture artists also have IUPUI academic roots.

The “Fearless Furniture” exhibit opens Oct. 5 and runs through May 2014 at the Indiana State Museum, just south of Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design’s main academic building and home to its furniture making department.

Hundreds of furniture craftspeople either born, trained or living in Indiana submitted proposals to have their works displayed in the exhibit. Eleven of the 24 artists have ties to Herron: Six are students or graduates; one is faculty/staff; and four are both.

“So many of the people who submitted pieces were Herron graduates. … When you look at how many (Herron graduates) were accepted, it is pretty much obvious Herron has an exceptional program,” said David Buchanan, the museum’s curator of decorative objects and furniture.

The selected artists include recent students as well as graduates from as early as 1982, reflecting Herron’s history of success in training students over the years. “Herron’s built an incredible furniture design program. It’s at the very pinnacle now,” Buchanan said.

The exhibit’s name reflects a trait considered essential for anyone making a career of designing and building furniture in a studio. “We were commenting on the idea that people who do this must have a strong sense of fearlessness. They are creating one-of-a kind pieces and trying to make a living,” Buchanan said.

Cory Robinson, associate professor and fine arts department chair at Herron, is one of three artists the museum invited to anchor the show. Robinson, also a Herron alumnus, was chosen “because of the program Herron has built and the direction it’s going,” said Meredith McGovern, the Indiana State Museum’s arts and culture collections manager.

Another show anchor is Laura Drake, assistant professor of industrial design at Purdue University. Drake, also a Herron alumna, was chosen because of Purdue’s industrial design program and its furniture component, the museum said.

In addition to Robinson and Drake, Herron-related artists in “Fearless Furniture” are Erin Behling, BFA ’99; Ray Duffey, MFA ’11 and Herron shop technician; Reagan Furqueron assistant professor and director of foundations; Matt Hutton, BFA ’99; James Lee, BFA ’82; Phillip Tennant, retired professor; Steven Sander, BFA ’12; Robert Sibley, completed foundation studies at Herron; and Colin Tury, second-year MFA degree candidate.

Fifty-eight artists submitted a total of 139 pieces for the juried component of the exhibition. Wendy Maruyama, professor emerita of woodworking and design at San Diego State University, juried “Fearless Furniture.” Maruyama will present a lecture at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the Indiana State Museum, followed by a reception celebrating the opening of the exhibition. Museum admission tickets are not required to attend the lecture or reception, which are free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To reserve seats for Maruyama’s talk, call the museum at 317-232-1637.

Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Regular admission tickets, which include admission to the “Fearless Furniture” exhibit, are $5.50 each for children 12 and under; and $10 each for adults.