NSF Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

NationalScienceFoundationIU Internal Deadline: 11/12/2014
NSF Proposal Deadline: 2/17/2015
Brief Description:
Accepts proposals for innovative research projects to foster ethical STEM research in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.
Proposed research should seek to provide answers to the following: What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?’ Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or membership in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility or humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a culture of academic integrity? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, or integrated into other research and learning settings?
Successful proposals will include a comparative dimension, either 1) between or within institutional settings that differ along the factors suggested or other factors, or 2) Institutional Transformation (IT) awards, where the comparison is over time– before and after an intervention. For IT, investigators are expected to gather and report baseline data in the first annual report. (See the reporting section of this solicitation for additional reporting requirements for both types of awards).
Award Amount:
·         The anticipated funding amount each year is $3,050,000 for an estimated 6-8 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 5 years.
·         Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.
·         Cost Sharing Requirements: Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
Eligibility:
NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy.
Limitation: One per University
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 12, 2014 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.
·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean
·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)
IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Gov. Pence recognizes 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellows

389647_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Ten aspiring teachers — including an oil industry engineer and a product development and quality control officer from the manufactured housing industry — will enroll at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis as members of the 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows.

Now in its sixth year at IUPUI, the Woodrow Wilson program is designed to prepare recent college graduates or working professionals with strong backgrounds in the STEM fields  – science, technology, engineering, and math — to teach in high-need secondary schools.

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation recently named a class of 45 2014 Indiana fellows. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence recognized the selected fellows June 9 during a Statehouse press conference attended by officials from the foundation, IUPUI and the other participating universities: Ball State University, Purdue University, University of Indianapolis and Valparaiso University.

“Attracting talent in science, technology, engineering and math to the teaching field will help our students better understand and be successful in these fields, which are so important to our state’s future success,” Pence said.

The Woodrow Wilson program at IUPUI is an interdisciplinary program between the IU School of Education, Purdue School of Science and Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. The IUPUI program offers a residency in which students are paired with a master teacher as a mentor for an full academic year.

“We feel this is the best way to prepare exemplary and experienced teachers for today’s diverse schools,” said Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “Our program has been successful in preparing a total of 66 secondary STEM teachers over the course of five years, and these teachers have secured jobs in high-need schools — primarily in Marion County.

“We continue to attract incredibly talented candidates who want to teach in high-need schools.  Our program prepares them to be successful via in-depth content expertise and leading-edge teaching and learning practices, intensive clinical experiences, strong mentorship and support during their first three years of teaching — all in partnership with our middle and high school partners.”

The teaching fellowship, started in Indiana, is now established in Ohio, Michigan, New Jersey and Georgia. Each Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellow receives $30,000 to complete a specially designed, leading-edge master’s degree program based on a yearlong classroom experience. In return, fellows commit to teach for three years in the Indiana schools that most need strong STEM teachers. Throughout the three-year commitment, fellows receive intensive ongoing support and mentoring.

“At IUPUI, we have designed our Woodrow Wilson STEM teacher preparation program to reflect teaching as a practice-based profession, much like a medical residency,” said Kathy Marrs, director of the IUPUI Woodrow Wilson Program. “Woodrow Wilson fellows at IUPUI complete a master’s degree program that combines a solid academic base, a strong one-year clinical teaching residency in our local urban schools, a three-year new teacher induction experience, and ongoing opportunities such as Project Lead the Way or special education dual certification.”

The IUPUI program is the only Woodrow Wilson Fellowship program in the country that offers dual certification in both STEM and special education certification.

The 10 IUPUI 2014 Woodrow Wilson teaching fellows, listed with previous graduation dates and majors, are:

  • Jonathan Bernardi: Amherst College ’99, Russian
  • Justin Bush, IUPUI ’13, biology
  • William Johnson: Purdue University ’07, mechanical engineering technology
  • Danielle Lord: Albion College ’08, geological sciences; University of New Mexico ’13, M.S., earth and planetary sciences
  • Tamara Markey: Purdue University ’94, industrial engineering
  • Donovan McCubbins: Bellarmine University ’13, chemistry
  • Taylor Mobley: Indiana University Bloomington ’14, chemistry
  • Katherine Russo: Indiana University Bloomington ’12, human biology
  • Daryl Traylor: Eastern Kentucky University ’13, biology; IUPUI ’14, M.S., biology
  • Lauren Wyatt: IUPUI ’13, biology

School of Informatics and Computing to participate in Passport to Hi-Tech

The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI is joining with other organizations Saturday, March 8, to teach girls about careers in science, technology, engineering and math at Conner Prairie.

The school will bring two activities to Passport to Hi-Tech at the interactive history park. The event is open to all ages but targeted to girls ages 7 to 12. Passport to Hi-Tech takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is free with paid general admission to Conner Prairie.

It will feature interactive exhibits and hands-on experiments designed to inspire girls to learn more about careers in STEM fields such as informatics, engineering, biology, chemistry, manufacturing, computer science and others. Passport to Hi-Tech was organized by Women & Hi-Tech and Conner Prairie. It is sponsored by Roche Diagnostics.

One of the School of Informatics and Computing’s activities is dubbed “Ready, Set, Compute!” Participants jump into computing and become a working part of a machine in a fast-paced game that shows what a computer does as friends play a game on it. When the players select a move, volunteer students will race to the CPU or other parts of the simulated device to deliver a signal for action, showing what goes on in a computer game.

The other activity will be demonstrating a Finch robot, a small, two-wheeled robot with bird-like features. Polly Baker, Ph.D., a professor of media arts and science in the Department of Human-Centered Computing, has programmed the robot so it can be controlled with hand gestures.

“The robot is approachable, and young people see they can control it,” said Vicki Daugherty, a school recruiting specialist. “It’s empowering. They say to themselves, ‘Hey, I can do this.’”