Claire Potter on Academics and the University of Facebook

DATE: 13 October 2014
TIME:
11:00-12:00
LOCATION:
IUPUI Campus Center, Room 268
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Dr. Claire Potter, “The University of Facebook”

What role does social media play in our careers as activist academics who are, to paraphrase psychologist Sherry Turkle, increasingly “alone together?” Social media is playing a crucial role in weaving together networks of academics across the oundaries of region, institutional status, and field. Conversations on Facebook simulate the comfort zone of the faculty lounge or the cocktail party after a Dr. Claire Potterdistinguished lecture. People share gossip, humor and express political views that merge with their scholarly interests.  But if crowd-sourcing a syllabus has the enormous advantage of staying in minute-by-minute contact with colleagues, what are the rules? And, if one’s house is no longer easily separated from one’s work space, under what conditions do we need to imagine our utterances on social media as occurring in the workplace too? Do academics have a lot to learn from teenagers?

About Dr. Claire Potter

Dr. Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. She has a BA in English Literature from Yale University and a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Dr. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012).  She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender Violence, and a collection of essays on academia in the digital age, Digital U: Why Crowdsourcing, Social Media, Word Press and Google Hangouts Could Save the Historical Profession.

Since 2007 Dr. Potter has written at Tenured Radical, a blog that moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011.

With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, Dr. Potter edits a book series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America, for the University of Georgia Press. Dr. Potter also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and is a co-director of OutHistory.org, re-launching its new website in October 2013.

Digital Arts & Humanities Workshops for 2014-15

Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop LogoAre you interested in creating a professional blog but don’t know where to start? Have you ever wished that you had the skills to visualize your research data? Do you want to know how to use social media to share your work with the public? The Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop is a new series presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship. It will provide hands-on training in skills such as scholarly social media and blogging, data mining, data visualization, online exhibitions, and more. This year, our workshops are targeted to beginners, so please take this opportunity to plunge into the fascinating world of the digital arts and humanities. Workshop events are free to IUPUI faculty, research staff, graduate students, and local non-profit professionals. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your place as soon as possible.


 

“Introduction to Data Visualization I: Visualization with Gephi” 9 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to basic data visualization with Gephi. Attendees will become familiar with the Gephi interface and will emerge with basic of Gephi’s applications. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-data-visualization-i-visualization-with-gephi-tickets-12090774833


“Introduction to Data Visualization II: Data Normalization for Network Analysis in Gephi” 16 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to network analysis with Gephi. Network analysis allows researchers to analyze and visualize qualitative and quantitative relationships between objects, people, and groups. This workshop will focus on how to capture and organize data so that Gephi can visualize network relationships. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-data-visualization-ii-network-analysis-in-gephi-tickets-12090929295


“Introduction to Scholarly Blogging” 6 November 2014, 12:00-2:00, UL 2120

There is a robust and growing community of scholars who share their research through blogging platforms such as WordPress, Blogger, and Drupal. Not only is blogging a way to engage with the public, but it is becoming increasingly important in creating and sustaining scholarly networks and communication. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have a blog up and running on WordPress.com, and they will understand the fundamentals of sharing information, building networks, and engaging with the public. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-scholarly-blogging-tickets-12090995493


“Social Media for Scholars” 11 March 2015, 12:00-1:30, UL 2120

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit. What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research? As it turns out, quite a bit. Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-media-for-scholars-tickets-12091039625

IUPUI liberal arts student curates photography exhibit that bridges physical, virtual spaces

389465_w296INDIANAPOLIS — A new photography exhibit curated by Aaron Pierce, a graduate student in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, brings together photographers from around the world in both a physical gallery space and a virtual space via Instagram and blogs.

Social Photography: Art in Progress” runs through June 27 at Indy Indie Artist Colony & Gallery, 26 E. 14th St. During the exhibit, photographers will share an Instagram account. The pictures they post will be projected onto the gallery’s walls, thus creating a worldwide, ever-changing art exhibit.

The exhibit seeks to create a dialog about the nature of photography in frequently changing social media environments.

Pierce, who also holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the School of Liberal Arts, is finishing a master’s degree in geographic information science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He describes the exhibit as a social experiment that is interactive and engages with the audience.

“We will be hosting a ‘Topic of the Day’ blog at our website where we will bring up topics that fit within the gallery themes, but each photographer’s photographic post will work as an individual pillar of conversation to build off of and connect with other topics, themes and ideas,” he said. “This will be a very fluid and active discussion; it could easily take us for completely unexpected spins.

“We are engrossed into virtual lives now, and this physical gallery serves as the place where we will get experimental with our space,” Pierce said. “We will be hosting artist talks through Google Hangouts from this location as well as interacting with both virtual and physical works hosted in the gallery.”

Pierce, a Carmel resident, said his interest in photography reaches back to childhood. He has also been able to incorporate photography into his academic work during study-abroad trips to Cuba and Morocco.

Pierce has also used social media platforms to showcase his photography, and he organized an IUPUI campus event where students could talk with Lauren Bohn, a journalist based in Cairo during the Arab Spring, via Skype. Bohn is among the photographers participating in the exhibit.

Other artists participating in the exhibit, some with ties to Herron School of Art and Design, include Milli Apelgren, Nabil Attia, Denise Conrady, Kevin Scott Davis, Juan Jerez, Amina Khazie, Sam Ladwig, Zun Lee, and Scott Witt.

“I saw this gallery exhibit as a way to not just show my work, but as an opportunity to use the space for a bigger role in exploring and discussing social media with photography through a collective of artists and an audience that is encouraged to engage with the exhibit,” Pierce said.

Social Photography: Art in Progress” can also be viewed on Instagram at @socphotogallery and followed via the #socphotogallery hashtag. Photo prints are available for purchase.