Tag Archive for School of Liberal Arts

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity,
and Scholarship Grants

Call for Proposals

Purpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship grant program is intended to support research, creative activity, and scholarship, not teaching and/or service activities.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to make 6-7 grants; the typical award amount is approximately $5,000, but exceptional proposals requesting more will be considered.  Proposals for smaller amounts are welcome. A budget with justification is required. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and collection of materials. They may also be used as matches or in combination with other research grants.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $4,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 27.41%, for total salary and fringe of $5,096. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is 28.59%, for total salary and fringe of $5,144.

Eligibility: Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the School of Liberal Arts who did not receive a SLA internal research grant last year. Applications from non-tenured assistant professors are encouraged.

Submission of Application

  • Deadline: Friday, March 8, 2013, 4:30 pm.
  • Please use standard 8 ½ by 11 page size with at least ½ inch margins. Use an Arial, Helvetica, Palatino Linotype, or Georgia typeface, a black font color, and a font size of 11 points or larger. Charts, graphs, figures, or custom cover sheets may be in color.
  • The Project Plan is limited to 5 pages.
  • Proposals should be submitted in PDF form via email to Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu, CA 441, 278-6970).

Criteria: Applications will be judged on 1) the significance and quality of the research project; 2) the clarity of stated objectives and details of methodology; 3) the feasibility of the project relative to funding requested and time frame; and 4) potential for future funding and/or for completion of the project. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Peer Review Meeting: Although not required, it is strongly suggested that applicants meet with Edith Millikan and/or Associate Dean Jeffrey Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) for an informal peer review of the proposal. We will provide feedback on how well your proposal meets the criteria discussed above, and provide assistance with drafting your budget.

The Application

The application consists of a cover sheet (appended as the last page of this document, a five-page project plan with budget, and a 4-page CV. These may be submitted as a single PDF document, or separate PDFs.

Cover sheet with title, amount requested, signatures of the applicant and the applicant’s departmental chair, and an indication of other applications for funding (this will not penalize this application). This is not included in the 5-page limit. Your email submission serves as your signature on the application form. Your department chair’s electronic signature occurs by copying her or him on your email submission.

Project Plan (Limited to 5 pages) Please use the following outline. Give sufficient detail for each outline item to indicate a well-thought out plan, including tasks, to accomplish the project.

  • Purpose and Significance of the research, creative activity or scholarship, including brief review of the relevant scholarly literature and what your research will add to the body of literature (Criterion #1)
  • The Specific Objectives of the project (Criterion #2)
  • Work Plan, Methods and Materials (Criteria #2 and #3)

o   Describe the work that will be conducted during the summer for which you seek funding. Include, as applicable, tasks you will perform to accomplish your objectives; data sources and/or archival collections you will use; data collection methods if relevant; other participants who will be involved (if any) and their roles on the project; location where work will take place if off campus; and manuscript preparation activities.

  • Timeline for the Activities (Criteria #2 and #3)
  • Evaluation Process and Plans for Dissemination (Criteria #1, #2, #3, and #4)

o   Describe how you will evaluate the success of your objectives and the analysis performed.

o   Describe your plans for disseminating the results of your research: Conference paper, scholarly article, presentation, etc.

  • Connection of this Project to Future Research, including prospects or plans for external funding (Criterion #4)
  • Budget and Rationale explaining the proposed use of funds (Criterion #3)

o   Describe the type of expense you wish covered, i.e., salary and fringe benefits, hourly student assistance, travel, data purchase, publications to assist your research, photocopying, rights and permissions, etc.

CV, limited to 4 pages. Please tailor the CV to the proposed project. Please limit your publication list to those most relevant to your proposed project. Limit the sections on teaching and service activity as room permits.

Notification: A sub-committee of the Research Advisory Committee will evaluate proposals and notify applicants by Friday, April 5, 2013.

Final Report: Recipients will be expected to file a report on their research or creative activities by Friday, December 6, 2013. Please mark this on your calendars!

 

Click here for forms: SLA 2013 Research and Creative Activity Grant

Shakespeare at IUPUI: a trailer for a new WFYI documentary

CSI Shakespeare – In the spring of 2102, IUPUI presented the world premiere of a lost 400-year old play by William Shakespeare, titled “The History of Cardenio.” This half-hour documentary highlights the 20 year-effort by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Gary Taylor to recreate the play, filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to resurrect the original manuscript.  Viewers will also travel with Gary to the Globe Theatre in London and retrace his academic roots as a precocious and oft-published “enfant terrible” at Oxford University Press.  Then, we return to Indianapolis to witness the first-blown production of the work—an experimental collaboration with Hoosier Bard Productions, including the recording of a period-accurate but original musical score for vocals and lute, to christen the new urban theatre space at IUPUI.
7:30pm, November 1st.
Producer: Jim Simmons

 

 

Reading at the Table: David J. Bodenhamer, “The Revolutionary Constitution”

Reading at the Table: The Revolutionary Constitution

David J. Bodenhamer
Professor of History
Director, The Polis Center
IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

September 13, 2012, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, University Place Faculty Club

The annual Reading at the Table series provides a forum to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty. During each luncheon, the featured author will read from his/her work and open the floor to discussion. Buffet lunch is available for $11.80.

Register at: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

 

David J. Bodenhamer is Founder and Executive Director at The Polis Center, Professor of History, and Adjunct Professor of Informatics at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. He is the author or editor of several books on American legal and constitutional history, including Fair Trial: Rights of the Accused in American History, and is co-editor of the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing.

In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America’s basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security.

Bodenhamer Reading at the Table

NEW COURSE: 20th-Century African Fiction

ANNOUNCING FOR FALL 2012:
L382: 20th-Century African Fiction
(Fiction of the Non-Western World)

David Hoegberg, Associate Professor of English
Tuesday evenings 6:00 – 8:40 PM
Course number 12988

The decolonization of Africa in the 1950s and 1960s sparked an explosion of African literature that continues to this day. This literature is vibrant, skillful, and deeply concerned with the social issues facing African nations. This course will introduce students to an exciting range of African fiction written in English from Nigeria, Kenya, Zimbabwe, and South Africa. Emphasis throughout the course will be on making the works accessible and interesting to students, relating them to historical contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills.

Course instructor David Hoegberg is a three-time winner of the Trustees Teaching Award in the IU School of Liberal Arts.

For non-English majors, L382 fulfills the requirement for 300-level courses outside the major. Students in English, History, Anthropology, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, and other departments will find much that is enjoyable and relevant to their work.

L382 is on the list of approved course for the Africana Studies major and minor.
Further questions?

Please contact Prof. David Hoegberg, 274-9823, dhoegberg@aol.com

Artist-in-Residence Lecture: Tim Hardy, “From Shakespeare to Shaw to Sondheim: Theatre for the 21st Century”

Tim Hardy

DATE: Thursday, September 6, 2012

TIME: 7:30PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, IUPUI; 735 W. New York St.; Indianapolis, IN 46202 

THIS EVENT IS FREE BUT SPACE IS LIMITED. TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT, CLICK HERE.

Tim Hardy looks at our seemingly constant need for drama of one kind or another — stories, theater, film, opera, literature. Concentrating principally on theater, he identifies how drama has changed through the centuries, reflecting the society it serves.  By staying relevant to its audiences, theater still succeeds in “holding a mirror up to nature” in such a way that we can both recognize ourselves and be wonderfully surprised and informed.

As a professional actor since the mid-sixties, Tim Hardy argues that if we don’t keep an ever-vigilant eye out for lazy, repetitive theatre — and he offers examples — if we don’t truthfully and completely re-invent the means whereby we would excite, inform, and delight our audiences, then we are on the short route to what the great director Peter Brook calls “dead theatre.”  From this there can be no recovery.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is pleased to welcome internationally-acclaimed actor/director Tim Hardy as a 2012 artist-in-residence.  Based in London, Mr. Hardy is on the faculty of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company (in Peter Brook’s Marat/Sade and Peter Hall’s Henry V) and at prestigious theatres across the United Kingdom and Europe.  A company member of Opera Music Theatre London, Mr. Hardy has also performed in numerous operas and musical theatre productions including La Traviata, The Magic Flute, and Guys and Dolls. He has narrated over 300 television documentaries, including series for The Discovery Channel and The History Channel, and his on-camera television work includes roles opposite Ian McKellen and Michael Gambon. Mr. Hardy’s extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Twelve Angry Men, The Crucible, Gaslight, Lady Windermere’s Fan, The Seagull, The Arcadians, and The Doll’s House.

This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the The New Oxford Shakespeare at IUPUI.

For tickets, click here.

IUPUI professor receives Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award

kryder-reid

The Association of Midwest Museums has honored an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor for long-term distinguished service to the museum profession.

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, who teaches museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is the recipient of the 2012 Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award. The association’s awards committee unanimously voted to present the annual award to Kryder-Reid in recognition of her outstanding commitment to the association and her exemplary service to the museum profession.

The IUPUI professor accepted the award today during a ceremony at the association’s general conference, which takes place through July 26 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Indianapolis.

The Association of Midwest Museums, established in 1927, provides programs and services to museums throughout an eight-state region in the Midwest. More than 400 museum professionals are attending this year’s association conference in Indianapolis. The three-day event features outstanding sessions, guest speakers, and tours and receptions at museums in the host city.