IUPUI announces new degrees focused on law in liberal arts and informatics

imagesThe Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a proposal for two new degrees at IUPUI: One prepares undergraduate students for careers as paralegals, and the other provides a path for students to transition rapidly into in-demand and well-paid information technology jobs.

IUPUI will ask the Indiana Commission for Higher Education for final approval to offer the degrees beginning in the fall.

“These programs are the latest examples of IUPUI’s tradition of developing distinctive programs that respond to student demand and meet employer needs,” said IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Nasser Paydar.

The proposed Bachelor of Arts in law in liberal arts degree expands the certificate in paralegal studies now offered by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, providing students with additional education and training and the baccalaureate degree increasingly required by employers. Students in the past could take the certificate in addition to a Bachelor of Arts degree in another discipline. But that required at least six courses beyond their degree, which burdened students with added expense and time.

The degree will provide students with the theoretical and conceptual components of the law and an introduction to the court system and legal procedures. Students will develop practical, real-world legal skills with courses in legal research, legal writing and litigation skills. In addition, students will be able to tailor the curriculum according to their own interests by selecting a number of elective courses from various legal specialties, including criminal law, family law, estate law and a variety of business law courses.

The second new program is a master’s degree offered by the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI. The proposed Master of Science in informatics offers specializations in data analytics, biomedical informatics, knowledge and information management, and user experience design.

The goal of the Master of Science in informatics is to enable students to apply informatics in their respective disciplines. To achieve that goal, the department proposes first to establish the new degree itself, providing specializations from within the school; and then to offer interdisciplinary five-year B.S./M.S. programs and dual degrees with other schools at IUPUI to meet the competitive requirements of Indiana’s job market.

Informatics has become not only an integral part of many disciplines and professions but also an essential skill for graduates.

The Master of Science in informatics will expand career opportunities of undergraduate students and degree holders in nontechnical disciplines by enabling them to apply information technology skills to their own field or to transition into information technology fields.

Laura Holzman, Modupe Labode, and Mary Price to discuss “The Value and Values of Public Scholarship”

Indiana Humanities LogoFebruary 24, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
755 W. Michigan St.

The 21st-century research university is no ivory tower.  It is a vibrant space that cultivates creativity and experiment — a space that encourages and supports multiple ways of knowing and doing.  Public scholarship is an essential pillar of the 21st-century university, building bridges and partnerships between the institution and the many publics with which its members engage.  This roundtable will engage with the following questions. What is public scholarship? What roles does it play in research, creative activity, and teaching?  What misconceptions do people have about public scholarship? How should universities evaluate public scholarship in promotion and tenure? How does one become a public scholar?

Dr. Laura Holzman is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art in Art History in the Herron School of Art and Design and in Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Modupe Labode is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of African American History and Museums in History and Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Mary Price is the Faculty Development Director in the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and an Associate Faculty member in Anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

Award-winning novelists and poets headline Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI

Emily Gray Tedrowe

Emily Gray Tedrowe

The Spring 2015 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis kicks off Thursday, March 5, with Emily Gray Tedrowe reading from her works, including the recently published second novel, “Blue Stars.”

Tedrowe’s first novel, “Commuters,” was listed as a Best New Paperback by Entertainment Weekly, an IndieNext Notable pick and a Target Breakout Book. Tedrowe also has published work in the Chicago Tribune’s Printers Row Journal, “Fifty-Two Stories, and Other Voices.”

All readings will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Lilly Auditorium, University Library, 755 W. Michigan St, unless otherwise noted.

Other series events, open to students, faculty, staff and the general public, include:

  • Thursday, March 12 — 16th annual “International Women’s Day: A Celebration” with poetry, music and visual art to honor the creativity of women around the world. Program includes an opening reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by featured performers at 7 p.m. and a multicultural, multilingual open mic at 8:20 p.m.

 

  • Michelle Herman

    Michelle Herman

    Thursday, April 2 — Essayist and fiction writer Michelle Herman, whose works include a collection of novellas, “A New and Glorious Life.” Her essay collection “The Middle of Everything, Stories We Tell Ourselves” was longlisted for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay.

 

 

  • Dana Roeser

    Dana Roeser

Thursday, April 16 — Dana Roeser, the author of three books of poetry including her latest, “The Theme of Tonight’s Party Has Been Changed.” Roeser is also author of “In the Truth Room” and “Beautiful Motion,” each winners of the Samuel French Morse Prize and nominated for the 2010 Poets’ Prize.

The Reiberg series was founded in 1997 by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI to honor department chair Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The series annually brings national and regional writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

Visitor parking for the readings is available in the North Street Garage, 819 W. North St.; the Vermont Street Garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.; and the Sports Complex Garage, 875 W. New York St.

The Spring 2015 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series, hosted by the Department of English, is made possible by the support of the Reiberg family; and IUPUI’s Office of Academic Affairs; University Library; University College; Office for Women; and Women’s Studies Program.

For additional information, contact Terry Kirts or by phone at 317-274-8929. Facebook users can “like” the series page at The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series @ IUPUI.

Partnership links to global opportunities

Four IUPUI faculty and staff members who are involved with international opportunities for students attended Oktobertfest in the fall: from left, Jennifer Williams, Pat Fox, Claudia Grossmann and Terri Talbert-Hatch.

Four IUPUI faculty and staff members who are involved with international opportunities for students attended Oktobertfest in the fall: from left, Jennifer Williams, Pat Fox, Claudia Grossmann and Terri Talbert-Hatch.

A partnership linking the School of Engineering and Technology and the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts has given four IUPUI students intriguing international experiences as they prepare to graduate in 2015.

A dual-degree program between the engineering school and German, Spanish and French language programs opened the doors to the internships. Three of them, Brian Knip, Eduardo Salcedo and Jesus Roman, worked with the Bosch Engineering Group in the small town of Abstatt. The fourth, C. J. Nielsen, worked at the University of Heilbronn. Both Abstatt and Heilbronn are located in southern Germany.

Knip, Salcedo and Roman tested their skills and knowledge in Bosch’s research and development department as part of an international group of engineering professionals, researchers and interns. Nielsen worked at an engineering lab alongside graduate students. All but Knip are part of IUPUI’s motorsports engineering program; Knip majors in mechanical engineering.

Claudia Grossmann, director of IUPUI’s German program, said the time abroad has an impact on the students.

“They gain new language, technical and intercultural skills, and gain on a personal level, as well,” Grossmann said. “They learn how to take care of themselves in another culture. As interns, they don’t have as much support as they are used to, so they have to deal with a wide range of practical experiences. That’s invaluable.”

Terri Talbert-Hatch, the assistant dean of student services in Engineering and Technology, knows the dual-degree program allows students to prepare for professional careers while benefitting schools at the same time.

“It helps us develop partnerships with other universities and with businesses,” she said. “Last year, for instance, an official from Bosch Motorsports in Detroit heard about our dual-degree program, and the talented students who were involved, and wondered why the company’s Detroit site didn’t have a similar program.” That has opened a discussion that may lead to opportunities in the U.S.

Both Grossmann and Talbert-Hatch have led student delegations to Germany, and have seen how the trips affected IUPUI students.

“Students figure out pretty quickly how studying abroad can benefit them in internships and career opportunities,” Talbert-Hatch said, noting a wealth of connections linking the U.S. and Germany in engineering fields.

Knip said he learned a lot during his time abroad, not all of it technical.

“Throughout my internship, I discovered both what I enjoyed and disliked about the possible careers available for mechanical engineering graduates,” he said. That knowledge has given him a stronger focus on his career goals as he applies and interviews with prospective employers.

The dual-degree program has been around for a decade, and Grossmann believes that internship prospects in German companies fit well with the language she teaches.

“We have a good following from engineering students, who often are interested in German engineering and want to take advantage of what they can learn,” she said.

“Engineers tend to look at things a little differently, and doing an internship in Germany allows them to experience technology that is just as advanced, but in a different culture,” Grossmann added. “The language immersion and engineering work enrich each other.”

By Ric Burrous

IUPUI Africana studies program presents first Heritage Week

The Africana Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will inaugurate the first Africana Studies Heritage Week Feb. 9 to 13.

The weeklong celebration will feature a series of public lectures; panel discussions; an art exhibit curated by Bessie House-Soremekun, professor and director of Africana studies; a book signing by Ronda Henry Anthony, public scholar of African American studies and undergraduate research; and film viewings based on the theme of “Reconnecting the African Diaspora to Africa.”

“It is entirely fitting and important for us to establish Africana Studies Heritage Week as one of the important traditions that we will celebrate yearly at IUPUI,” House-Soremekun said.

“We are delighted that we will celebrate the creation of black studies/Africana studies as a viable discipline in academia and pay tribute to the numerous contributions of Africa and of African-descended people who reside in the African Diaspora as part of the broader Black History Month activities. Africa is the birthplace of humankind as we know it and has been central in the development of global civilization processes. Our goal is to expose students, faculty and members of the broader community as a whole to these important issues.”

The Heritage Week celebrations will kick off Monday, Feb. 9, with a lecture featuring Dawn Batson, the former chair of the Department of Visual & Performing Arts at the Florida Memorial University and former chair of the National Steel Orchestra of Trinidad and Tobago, as the keynote speaker.

The event begins at 11:40 a.m. in Room 104 of Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St., with introductions from House-Soremekun and Khalilah Shabazz, director of the IUPUI Multicultural Center. Batson will speak from noon to 12:45 p.m.

As part of the Heritage Week observance, House-Soremekun will present an art exhibit and lecture, “The Africa the World Seldom Sees.” Using African artwork from her personal collection, as well as photos she took when she served as a faculty host on the “Treasures of East Africa Tour” to Tanzania and Kenya in 2014 (sponsored by the Indiana University Alumni Association), House-Soremekun will challenge stereotypical images of Africa often presented in popular culture by presenting a compelling counter-narrative that illuminates many positive attributes and beauty of African society.

The art exhibit is open for public viewing Feb. 9 to 28 in Taylor Hall, Room 101.

“The inaugural Africana Studies Heritage Week features a full line-up of very interesting and enjoyable events,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “I commend all those who have collaborated on the organization of this new program, and we’re looking forward to its successful launch.”

Other events open to students, faculty and the general public during Heritage Week include:

12:50 to 2:15 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, Taylor Hall, Room 115k — Panel discussion about the recent critically acclaimed film “Selma,” moderated by Monroe Little, associate professor of Africana studies and history.
6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10, Taylor Hall, Room 101 — A public reception with an Evening of Jazz performed by Bryan Thompson.
1:15 to 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11, Taylor Hall, Room 104 — The lecture “Negotiating Patriarchy, Colonial Legacies and Human Rights Law in Africa” by Obioma Nnaemeka, Chancellor’s professor of French, Africana studies and women’s studies;
Noon to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12, Taylor Hall, Room 104 — A lecture by Ronda Henry Anthony about her book, “Searching for the New Black Man, Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies.”
10 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb. 13, Taylor Hall, Room 115K — Viewing of the film “Honor & Glory,” the story of the co-discoverer of the North Pole, Matthew Henson.

Additional sponsors for the weeklong event include the IUPUI Office of Admissions; the IU School of Liberal Arts; Office for Diversity, Access, and Inclusion; Multicultural Center, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development.

The first annual Africana Studies Heritage Week is free and open to the public. A complete listing of events is available online.

For more information, call the Africana studies program at 317-274-8662.

IUPUI professors named among IBJ’s Forty Under 40

Genevieve G. Shaker

Genevieve G. Shaker

Daniel Vreeman

Daniel Vreeman

Two professors on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus are among the young professionals recognized as the Indianapolis Business Journal’s Class of 2015 Forty Under 40.

Genevieve Shaker of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and Daniel Vreeman of the Indiana University School of Medicine, also on the IUPUI campus, are named on the list of rising stars in their respective professions who were recognized not only for their early professional success, but also for their accomplishments in the greater Indianapolis community and the likelihood they will remain Indianapolis residents and build on those achievements.

This year’s IBJ Forty Under 40 are introduced in a special section of the Feb. 2 to 8 edition of the publication. Profiles of the 40 young professionals are also published in an interaction version available online.

Shaker, 39, associate dean for development and external affairs in the School of Liberal Arts, is also an assistant professor of philanthropic studies in the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Her IBJ profile cites Shaker’s “successful conclusion of the School of Liberal Arts’ seven-year, $18 million campaign, earning an award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals in the process.”

The Association of Fundraising Professionals named Shaker as the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Emerging Scholar Award. The award honors an early-career scholar or scholar-practitioner whose research has and will continue to shape the discourse on philanthropy and fundraising.

Shaker, who teaches the giving and volunteering in America course in the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, also received the Indiana University Trustees Teaching Award in 2013 and the IUPUI Student Athlete “Favorite Professor” award in 2013.

Vreeman, 36, is associate research professor in the School of Medicine and associate director of terminology services and research scientist with the Center for Biomedical Informatics at the Regenstrief Institute. As a child experimenting with his dad’s Commodore 64 computer, Vreeman created a database to keep track of his baseball card collection.

Today Vreeman has combined his love for computer science and technology with a career in medicine and biology and is advancing the use of computers in health care. He is directing development of a medical vocabulary standard, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes, or LOINC, for short. The language allows for the exchange and aggregation of results across clinics using universal codes. As a principal investigator, he has received $16 million in external funding, and has collaborated on another $40 million in projects.

“Reading about the Forty Under 40 is inspiring for all of us — and Professors Shaker and Vreeman demonstrate how IUPUI faculty make a difference — whether shaping health information or philanthropy,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “Incredibly talented and passionate about their work, they are making long-lasting impact on Indiana and beyond.”

IBJ’s Forty Under 40 recognition program is in its 23rd year. New this year for each honoree is the chance to support causes important to him or her. Central Indiana Community Foundation has provided $40,000 in grants to be designated to local organizations by this year’s Forty Under 40 honorees.

A committee of three IBJ staff members and two members of the 2014 Forty Under 40 class selected this year’s class from among 269 nominations made by IBJ readers and staff.

All 40 young professionals will be honored during a reception Tuesday, Feb. 3 at the Skyline Club.

IUPUI associate dean Genevieve Shaker honored with professional group’s Emerging Scholar Award

Genevieve G. Shaker

Genevieve G. Shaker

An Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis administrator and professor has received national recognition for demonstrating a promising career as a researcher whose scholarship will shape the disciplines of philanthropy and fundraising.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals has selected Genevieve G. Shaker, associate dean for development and external affairs in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and assistant professor in the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, as the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Emerging Scholar Award.

Established by the Research Council of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2013, the Emerging Scholar Award honors an early-career scholar or scholar-practitioner whose research has and will continue to shape the discourse on philanthropy and fundraising.

“The Emerging Scholar jury recognized Dr. Shaker’s extremely impressive training and experience,” said Russell James, chair of the association’s Emerging Scholar Award Committee. “Her research provides a greater understanding of academic workplace giving and motivation of faculty in seeking academic careers. Her work will further enhance fundraising strategy development for the field and will provide insights regarding donor motivations, interests and giving trends.”

Emerging Scholar jurors rated nominated scholars on their record of scholarship; demonstrated evidence of a further promising career as an academic researcher or scholar-practitioner; demonstrated impact on the state of scholarship or advancement of knowledge; and evidence of impact on fundraising practice.

“I’m humbled to have been chosen by my peers in AFP for this wonderful award and grateful for the support I have received at IUPUI to pursue my research interests as well as to serve the university as an advancement professional,” Shaker said. “I’m looking forward to the opportunity to make further contributions to the field, higher education and society.”
Shaker, who is also an adjunct professor of liberal arts, focuses her research on workplace giving and higher education advancement, as well as the faculty profession. She has been recognized with several other national awards, including the Dissertation of the Year Award in 2009 from the Association for the Study of Higher Education; and, with her co-authors, the 2009 Robert Menges Award for research in educational development and a 2013 Charles F. Elton Best Paper Award from the Association for Institutional Research.

“Dr. Shaker has quickly become a highly productive and influential researcher on fundraising within colleges and universities, and especially on the philanthropic activities of faculty and staff,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts. “It is very gratifying to see her work receive this well-deserved national recognition through the AFP Emerging Scholar Award.”

Shaker completed her doctorate in higher education at Indiana University Bloomington and holds a master’s in philanthropic studies from the Center on Philanthropy, the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s predecessor.

Since 1960, the Association of Fundraising Professionals has advanced effective and ethical philanthropy by providing advocacy, research, education, mentoring, collaboration and technology opportunities for the world’s largest network of professional fundraisers. AFP’s more than 30,000 members raise more than $100 billion annually.
The AFP Research Council leads the association’s efforts to identify research priorities for AFP; recognize and promote research that informs philanthropy and fundraising practice; and translate and disseminate research-based knowledge to practitioners.

IUPUI professor provided key testimony in Nigerian oil-spill case settled for $83 million

Scott Pegg treks through mud, dead mangrove trees and previous oil spill residue to get to the site of a new oil spill in 2012.

Scott Pegg treks through mud, dead mangrove trees and previous oil spill residue to get to the site of a new oil spill in 2012.

In an out-of-court settlement announcement Wednesday, Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria agreed to a compensation package of 55 million pounds — about $83.4 million — for a Nigerian farming and fishing community damaged by massive oil spills in 2008 and 2009. An Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor had been among witnesses for the residents of Bodo, Nigeria, in their three-year legal battle.

According to a statement by Leigh Day, the London-based law firm representing the community of Bodo, 15,600 individual claimants will received a total of 35 million pounds, with the remainder of the settlement going to the Bodo community as a whole. Shell has also agreed to clean up the Bodo Creek, Day said.

Scott Pegg, chair of the Department of Political Science in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, has been actively involved in the life of Bodo for more than 14 years. As someone who has worked in Bodo for years and as an honorary chief in the village, Pegg said it was the least he could do to provide a detailed witness statement on behalf of the Bodo plaintiffs.

Pegg first visited the community in 2000 and returned a year later with his wife, Tijen Demirel-Pegg. The then newlyweds donated $2,800 of their wedding gift money to the Bebor Model Nursery and Primary School in Botor Village, Bodo. This money finished a roofing project and funded a cement floor for a five-classroom primary school building at the school that now serves more than 300 children.

The couple continued to raise money for the school, and in 2002 their work was formally incorporated into the work of the Indianapolis-based charity now known as Timmy Global Health. The Peggs’ work with the school in Bodo now includes providing boreholes for drinking water; boys’, girls’ and teachers’ toilets for better sanitation; and a pilot health program providing immunizations, health exams and deworming treatments to students at the school.

In 2002, the Bodo Council of Chiefs named the Peggs honorary chiefs in recognition of their contribution to the community’s educational development. In August 2005, Botor Village in Bodo dedicated the “Chief Prof Scott Pegg Road.”

Pegg’s written testimony, filed in the case before the High Court in London, used numerous pictures to document the story of Bodo’s transformation after the oil spills from a vibrant fishing community to a land of “environmental devastation as far as the eye could see.”

Of particular interest to the British lawyers representing the Bodo claimants were the many photographs Pegg had from earlier visits to Bodo before the 2008-09 oil spills. Pegg and people who visited with him often would go down to the waterfront and paddle out into Bodo Creek on a traditional fishing canoe for recreation. Pegg said he never envisioned that his “tourist photos” along the waterfront would actually be used to help document how green and verdant the mangrove forests in Bodo were before the oil spills.

Pegg, who holds a doctorate in political science, described himself as “sort of a perfect storm” as a witness in that the combination of his academic training and interests and his track record of publications on the oil industry in Africa, plus his local status as a chief in the village, made his testimony hard to discredit. At IUPUI, Pegg primarily teaches courses on international relations, war and conflict, U.S. foreign policy, globalization and African politics.

The IUPUI professor is proud of the fact that the Bodo case is the first major legal settlement where compensation has been paid directly to individual Africans and not just done through chiefs or community leaders. He believes the success or failure of the promised environmental cleanup of Bodo Creek will ultimately be even more important than the compensation itself. He also hopes the case will set a precedent and establish benchmark standards for oil companies to follow in dealing with other oil spills throughout the Niger Delta.

“Bodo has suffered and continues to suffer horribly because of the two massive oil spills that hit the community in 2008-09 and for which any kind of clean-up effort has still not yet started,” Pegg said in an email message to Timmy Global Health supporters and other friends. “Even if everything goes well with this settlement, the community faces a daunting list of challenges and problems.

“Still, this is a great day for the people of Bodo. As people who have supported them in various ways, I hope you can savor and enjoy this news as well.”