Pamela Z’s free concert is part of IUPUI performing artist mini-residencies

Photo © Mark Estes

Pamela Z                Photo © Mark Estes

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has announced that the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology’s Department of Music and Arts Technology will host three mini-residencies with performing artists during the 2014-15 school year. Pamela Z, a pioneer in live performance of vocal music with advanced electronics and multimedia, will be the first featured performing artist.

As part of the mini-residency, Pamela Z will perform a concert — co-sponsored by the department and the Indianapolis Opera — that is free to the IUPUI community and the public. It will take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 28, at Basile Opera Center, 4011 N. Pennsylvania St., in Indianapolis. Parking is free.

She also will be on the IUPUI campus for a lecture and demonstrations with music and arts technology majors. In a community outreach effort, Pamela Z will participate in a special workshop involving Girls Rock, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building positive self-esteem in girls and encouraging creative expression through music.

Pamela Z is a San Francisco-based composer/performer and media artist who works primarily with voice, live electronic processing, sampled sound and video. A pioneer of live digital looping techniques, she processes her voice in real time to create dense, complex sonic layers. Her solo works combine experimental extended vocal techniques, operatic bel canto, found objects, text and sampled concrète sounds.

She uses MAX MSP and Isadora software on a MacBook Pro along with custom MIDI controllers that allow her to manipulate sound and image with physical gestures. Her performances range in scale from small concerts in galleries to large-scale multimedia works in flexible black-box venues and proscenium halls. In addition to her performance work, she has a growing body of intermedia gallery works including multichannel sound and video installations. She has toured extensively throughout the United States, Europe and Japan.

 About the Department of Music and Arts Technology

The Department of Music and Arts Technology develops musicians seeking to become tomorrow’s technology and cultural leaders, those who will shape the course of music in Indiana and the world. The department is committed to delivering quality music instruction to undergraduates and graduates at the nation’s premier urban research university. The department is the first in the nation to offer both bachelor of science and master of science degrees in music technology. All of IUPUI’s music faculty members employ technology in their teaching, production, performance and research. In 2006, the department also launched an innovative, research-based Master of Science degree in music therapy.

 About the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI:
The mission of the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI is to be one of the best urban university leaders in the disciplines of engineering and technology recognized locally, nationally and internationally. The school’s goal is to provide students an education that will give them the leverage to be leaders in their communities, industry and society.

IUPUI Motorsports engineering and furniture design students build Formula-style race car

391007_w296INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Formula-style race car competing this week in Lincoln, Neb., is the unique collaborative work of students from two diverse programs on the IUPUI campus – motorsports engineering and furniture design.

The vehicle is one of more than 90 cars entered in the Formula SAE student design competition organized by SAE International, formerly known as the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Students from the motorsports engineering program in the Purdue School of Engineering & Technology at IUPUI designed, built and tested the majority of the IUPUI race car. However, the bodywork is the team work of motorsports students and students in the furniture design program of the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI.

“This inventive collaboration is a perfect example of the relevance of art and design to a broad array of applications beyond ‘fine art.’ It also serves as an example of the opportunities afforded to students at IUPUI by faculty who are more than willing to work across school boundaries with their colleagues,” said Glennda McGann, assistant dean for development and external affairs at Herron.

Pete Hylton, associate professor of mechanical engineering technology, is director of the motorsports engineering program at IUPUI, the first U.S. university to offer a bachelor’s degree in motorsports engineering.

Furniture craftsman Cory Robinson, associate professor and chair of Herron’s fine arts department, directed the Herron students working on the race car project.

“It was very interesting to see the kinds of machines that they use to make furniture….and to figure out how to translate our needs to their equipment,” said Nikky Saxon, a motorsports engineering student who worked on the race car project. “The Herron students were very helpful and easy to work with.  It was a great experience.”

According to the description on the SAE website, the concept behind Formula SAE is that a fictional manufacturing company has contracted a design team to develop a small Formula-style race car for a non-professional weekend autocross racer. Each collegiate team designs, builds and tests a prototype based on a series of rules set up both to ensure onsite event operations and promote clever problem solving.

Motorsports engineering students developed the IUPUI race car’s basic shape using 3D computer modeling to fit a shape around the chassis, including an aerodynamic underbody which provides ground effects. The shape of the underside of the body creates down-force by channeling the airflow through a venturi shaped passageway, similar to what is done on IndyCar and Formula One racecars.

The IUPUI engineering students handed off their design to the Herron students who went to work using their school’s gantry mill — typically used to shape wood for furniture design projects — to shape the pieces which were assembled to form the car’s required body shape.

A fiberglass mold was then made of this shape, and finally a composite layup was made using that mold and it was cured with the help of Indy Performance Composites to complete the body parts.  These were then fitted to the chassis, which is a steel tube-frame configuration built with materials donated to the program by AED Motorsports of Indianapolis.

“We were able to make a much more complex shape by using the Herron gantry mill,” Hylton said. “We were able to design the car on the computer using 3D modeling and translate that to hardware using the gantry mill. Working with specialists from another (non-engineering) realm is excellent experience for our students….and very real world.”

The IUPUI vehicle completed its tech inspection Wednesday as one of less than 40 entries to accomplish that requirement on Day 1 of the four-day racing event.

Design judging took place Thursday. Dynamic competitions such as acceleration, skidpad, autocross, and endurance events will take place today and Saturday.

IUPUI last competed in Formula SAE in 2011 when the school was the top finishing rookie team at the event held at Michigan International Speedway.

For further information, contact Motorsports Engineering Director Pete Hylton at phylton@iupui.edu or FSAE faculty advisor, Andy Borme at aborme@iupui.edu.