Michael Eric Dyson headlines event to honor outstanding IU School of Education alumni

Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson

Scholar of African American, religion and cultural studies Michael Eric Dyson is the keynote speaker for the third annual “Celebration of Transformational Educators” event presented by the IU School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

The event, at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at the Madame Walker Theater, 617 Indiana Ave., in Indianapolis, is free and open to the public.

Dyson is a well-regarded public intellectual who appears regularly on national television and radio and has published numerous academic works. The Chronicle of Higher Education calls him “one of the youngest stars in the firmament of black intellectuals” and “one of the most important voices of his generation.”

Dyson will keynote the annual awards ceremony for the IU School of Education at IUPUI, which recognizes outstanding early-career alumni who have conducted their work in an urban setting. A committee selects honorees from a pool of nominees. Each honoree receives a $1,000 award to advance his or her work.

The Steward Speaker Series is co-sponsoring the event as a part of its ongoing effort to bring some of the country’s top African American leaders and luminaries to Indianapolis to share their thoughts and work. The IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion is a contributor to this event.

“We are very pleased to have a speaker of Dr. Dyson’s caliber to shine a positive spotlight on the work of our outstanding alumni who are, indeed, transformational educators,” said Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “His message is sure to inspire.”

Dyson is the Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor at DePaul University. He has taught at Chicago Theological Seminary, Brown University, the University of North Carolina and Columbia University. He received his Bachelor of Arts in philosophy, magna cum laude, from Carson-Newman College, and his Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees in religion from Princeton University. He has provided commentary on American culture for “Nightline,” “Charlie Rose,” “Good Morning America,” “Today” and “Oprah.” He has also been heard on every major show on National Public Radio. He has written for numerous academic publications, including Cultural Critique, Cultural Studies, DePaul Law Review, The Leadership Quarterly, New Art Examiner, JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Transition, Social Text, Religion and Literature, Theology Today, Union Seminary Quarterly Review, Princeton Seminary Bulletin and Black Sacred Music.

Dyson’s 1993 debut book, “Reflecting Black: African-American Culture Criticism” won the Gustavus Myers Center for Human Rights Award in 1994. His critically acclaimed follow-up, 1994′s “Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X,” was named “Notable Book of 1994″ by both The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Dyson is also author of the acclaimed “Between God and Gangsta Rap: Bearing Witness to Black Culture,” named a “Best Bet” by USA Today, and the national best-seller “Race Rules: Navigating the Color Line.” In January 2000, the Free Press published Dyson’s “I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr.”

He has also written for many popular publications, including The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Vibe magazine and Rolling Stone. Time, U.S. News and World Report, USA Today, Current Biography, The New Yorker, The Chronicle of Higher Education and Essence have profiled him. Dyson has lectured across the nation and throughout the world in countless colleges, universities and public auditoriums. He won the 1992 Award of Excellence for Magazines from the National Association of Black Journalists.

While the event is free, seating is limited. RSVP online by Nov. 17 to ensure your space.

IUPUI administrator chosen for IPS superintendent’s transition team

An IUPUI administrator is among a group of prestigious national and local leaders chosen to serve on Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Lewis D. Ferebee’s transition team, the school district announced Monday.

Patricia Rogan, executive associate dean of the School of Education at IUPUI, is one of seven appointees to the team that will analyze and provide feedback to Ferebee on improving the academic performance, operating efficiencies and communication practices for the district.

Rogan is a professor of special education at the School of Education. She has been a university professor for 30 years with interests in secondary education, transition, supported employment and organizational change. Rogan consults nationally and internationally with schools, adult services and state leaders to promote positive practices and systems change.

“Dr. Rogan’s commitment to educating students is only matched by her commitment to improving the quality of that education. Her intelligence, experience and commitment will drive her contributions to Dr. Ferebee’s transition,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said.

Other Ferebee transition team members are Kelvin Adams, superintendent, St. Louis Public Schools; Linda L. Kirby, program director, Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce; Terry B. Grier, superintendent, Houston Independent; Amos Brown, director of strategic research and editor, Radio One; and Chris Horan, managing partner, Horan Communications.

The transition team will provide recommendations that will be considered as part of the superintendent’s overarching listening tour, which will help guide the development of the district’s next strategic plan. The team will begin interacting with the IPS community this month and will report its findings and recommendations in March.

Symposium continues exchange between schools of education at IUPUI and Moi University

The latest in a continuing exchange of ideas and best practices between the Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI and the Moi University School of Education in Eldoret, Kenya, takes place next week in Indianapolis.

Faculty from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Moi will hold the second annual Faculty Symposium on Research and Teaching on Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 29 and 30, at the Lilly Auditorium on the lower level of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

The purpose is to bring together faculty from the two schools of education to share their research, teaching interests and scholarship, related to this year’s theme “Interrogating Educational Policy and Practice in Kenya and the U.S.” Through face-to-face presentations and discussions, Moi and IUPUI faculty will hear from each other and explore opportunities for joint scholarship and initiatives.

The first symposium took place in Kenya in August 2012. Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI, led a group of four faculty who traveled to Eldoret, which is almost 200 miles northwest of Nairobi. Seven faculty from Moi will travel to Indianapolis.

“We are committed to a mutually beneficial partnership that enhances faculty collaboration and student exchanges,” Rogan said. “The symposium will advance our internationalization efforts while strengthening relationships between Moi and IUPUI faculty.”

The symposium is an extension of IU and Moi University’s long-standing relationship, which began with the IU School of Medicine and Moi teaming up on the AMPATH Center, or Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a clinic that helps treat Kenyans with HIV and AIDS. In addition, the IU and Moi schools of journalism recently agreed to continue their partnership, and Kenya is now home to the IU Alumni Association Kenya Chapter.

The IU School of Education at IUPUI signed a memorandum of understanding with Moi University to formally partner for continuing professional exchanges. Last year’s symposium in Kenya allowed faculty from both universities to share best practices and research on a variety of topics. The Moi faculty presented on the teacher preparation practices at Moi, how the Moi faculty uses research to inform policy and practice in higher education, and science curriculum. Faculty from IUPUI spoke about teaching techniques with the latest technology, issues surrounding the education of urban youth, and women in education.

“This year’s symposium will offer a wide range of leading edge topics among the seven Moi and seven (IUPUI) School of Education presenters,” Rogan said. “It promises to be a highly informative and exciting event.”

The sessions are free and open to the public. Organizers request attendees pre-register online.