IUPUI University Library launches Center for Digital Scholarship for Open Access Week

In celebration of the sixth annual Open Access Week, IUPUI University Library has announced the opening of the Center for Digital Scholarship.

The center works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of our communities. With Kristi L. Palmer as director, the center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for the rights of authors, fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

Located in Room 1115 on the first floor of the library, the Center for Digital Scholarship is open for services and questions related to open access. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Recent open access collaborations with IUPUI scholars and Indiana community organizations include:

  • Advances in Social Works: A peer-reviewed, open access journal — one of seven journals hosted on Open Journal Systems at IUPUI.
  • Faculty Grants: Supporting the digitization and online organization of open access collections related to faculty scholarship.
  • Indianapolis Recorder: Open access to over 5,000 issues and 106 years of African American history in a community newspaper.
  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection: Open access to over 14,000 historic images dating back to 1909.
  • IUPUI DataWorks: A new open access data repository for preserving and sharing IUPUI digital research data.
  • IUPUI Open Access Publishing Fund: A pilot fund of $47,000 to underwrite reasonable publication charges for articles published in fee-based, peer-reviewed, open access journals.
  • IUPUI ScholarWorks: An open access repository of over 3,000 articles, reports, posters, dissertations and theses by IUPUI faculty and students.
  • Neighborhood of Saturdays: A unique digital humanities collaboration providing open access to over 500 images and artifacts from a multiethnic neighborhood on the near south side of Indianapolis.

The Center for Digital Scholarship will also host a special open house in November for the campus and the community to learn more about its work. The event will take place from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, on the ground floor of the University Library.

Open Access Week

The International Open Access Week, Oct. 21 to 27, is a global event in its sixth year. Open Access Week is a time for the academic community to share the potential benefits of open access, the practice of providing free and unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly research, and help integrate the practice in scholarship and research. To learn how you can claim the benefits of open access for your research at IUPUI, visit the IUPUI University Library.

Fall events encourage developing effective research and scholarship

Developing Multi-Investigator, Multi-Institutional Proposals

Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:30  – 1:00 PM

University Library, Room 1116

The current funding environment favors large, complex, multi-institutional, multi-investigator projects. However, organizing a successful submission takes a great deal of planning and teamwork. What works best in which situation? Should you use a “Red Team Review”? What role does the RFP serve to organize the writing efforts? Professional proposal writers and editors will discuss these and a number of related issues at this session. You are welcome to bring your lunch (limited to 30 attendees). Register here.

Nine Golden Rules to Succeed in Research and Scholarship

Friday, October 25, 2013, 11:30 – 1:00 PM

University Library, Room 1126

This session will reveal the Nine Golden Rules on how to succeed in research and scholarship. It is focused toward new and early career investigators; however, mid-career faculty should find information of interest as well. Register here.

IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Showcase & Forum

Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 4:00 – 6:00 PM

Campus Center, Room 450 A and B

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Indiana University Research & Technology Corporation (IURTC) cosponsor the IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Showcase & Forum. This event highlights the research and creative successes of our faculty, research scientists, and students as they relate to technology transfer and commercialization, noticeably supporting the economic development of Indiana and the nation. Explore the many opportunities for partnering with IUPUI or learn about the exciting entrepreneurial ventures being launched. Register here.

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal (IAHI) Grants Information Session

Tuesday, December 3, 2013, 1:00 – 3:00 PM

University Library, Room 1126

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IAHI internal funding opportunity, how to apply, and more importantly how to develop a competitive proposal. Members of the IAHI grant advisory group will be present to answer questions, as well as IUPUI faculty who have received IAHI funding and who have reviewed arts and humanities proposals. Register here.

Imaging symposium presents opportunities to learn from IUPUI experts, build collaborative research

The IUPUI Imaging Research Symposium takes place from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, in the Lilly Auditorium of University Library, 755 W. Michigan St.

Academic and industrial researchers and investigators are invited to learn more about the imaging technologies available at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis during a daylong event that includes 20-minute talks, poster displays, special guest lectures and opportunities to tour IUPUI imaging laboratories.

Presentations by campus researchers will highlight several IUPUI imaging capabilities as well as the applications of advanced imaging methods to address current scientific, medical and engineering questions. The goal of the symposium is to promote knowledge of the IUPUI imaging community and to foster collaborative research opportunities.

Experts from the Indiana Institute for Biomedical Imaging Sciences, the Indiana Center for Biological Microscopy, the Nanoscale Imaging Center, The 3D Imaging of the Craniofacial Complex Center and the Electron Microscopy Center, all members of the IUPUI Imaging Research Initiative, will discuss their imaging facilities and their research.

Invited guest speakers include Dr. Daniel C. Sullivan from Duke University Medical Center and Andrew J. Bowling of Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis.

Sullivan will discuss “Quantitative Imaging in Medicine” from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m. and Bowling will discuss “Imaging & Crop Development” from 2:15 to 3 p.m. Guided tours through several IUPUI imaging laboratories will be available from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

More information and a registration form are available on the IUPUI Imaging Research Initiative website or by emailing Mark Holland at imgres@iupui.edu.

Huntington Library Research Fellowships 2014-15

Fellowships at The Huntington 2014-2015

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present and include seven million manuscripts, 413,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Within the general fields listed above there are many areas of special strength, including: Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

The Huntington will award to scholars over 150 fellowships for the academic year 2014-2015. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life.

Application deadline for all fellowships: Nov. 15, 2013.

Huntington Fellowships

Short-Term Awards
Long-Term Awards
Dibner History of Science Program

 

For full fellowship and grant program details and deadlines, including application procedure and submission guidelines, visit The Huntington’s website.

Short-Term Awards
Huntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

  • Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
  • Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
  • Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
  • Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
  • Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
  • Molina Fellowships in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.

The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Linacre College, Oxford

Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall

Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Travel Grants

Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2014, and no later than June 30, 2015.

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship

Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.

Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).

Amount of award: $5,500.

Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Dr. Gerald Cloud at gwcloud@humnet.ucla.edu.

Long-Term Awards
Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships

Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections and must have received their PhD between 2009 and 2011.

Mellon Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dibner Program in the History of Science

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library and to work in the other resources for the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

Short-Term Awards

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

Long-Term Awards

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants can be conducting research or already be at the writing stage and need reference materials only.

Russel Sage Foundation Research Support

One of the oldest American foundations, the Russell Sage Foundation was established by Mrs. Margaret Olivia Sage in 1907 for “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.” In its early years the Foundation undertook major projects in low-income housing, urban planning, social work, and labor reform. The Foundation now dedicates itself exclusively to strengthening the methods, data, and theoretical core of the social sciences as a means of diagnosing social problems and improving social policies.

The Russell Sage Foundation is an operating foundation directly involved in the conduct and dissemination of social science research. In its effort to improve the social effectiveness of social research, the Foundation

  • Invites individual scholars and collaborative groups working in areas of Foundation interest to participate in the Foundation’s Visiting Scholar Program to pursue their research and writing projects;
  • Provides support for scholars at other institutions to pursue research projects that advance the Foundation’s research programs;
  • Assures widespread access to the research that the Foundation supports through its own book publishing program;
  • Sponsors special seminars and working groups aimed at developing new topics in social science;
  • Participates in the planning of each study or program as an active partner and reserves the right to publish any resulting manuscripts;
  • Collaborates with other granting agencies and academic institutions in studies of social problems.

How to apply for support from the Foundation

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

SLA Summer 2013 Research, Creative Activity,
and Scholarship Grants

Call for Proposals

Purpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship grant program is intended to support research, creative activity, and scholarship, not teaching and/or service activities.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to make 6-7 grants; the typical award amount is approximately $5,000, but exceptional proposals requesting more will be considered.  Proposals for smaller amounts are welcome. A budget with justification is required. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and collection of materials. They may also be used as matches or in combination with other research grants.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $4,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 27.41%, for total salary and fringe of $5,096. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is 28.59%, for total salary and fringe of $5,144.

Eligibility: Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the School of Liberal Arts who did not receive a SLA internal research grant last year. Applications from non-tenured assistant professors are encouraged.

Submission of Application

  • Deadline: Friday, March 8, 2013, 4:30 pm.
  • Please use standard 8 ½ by 11 page size with at least ½ inch margins. Use an Arial, Helvetica, Palatino Linotype, or Georgia typeface, a black font color, and a font size of 11 points or larger. Charts, graphs, figures, or custom cover sheets may be in color.
  • The Project Plan is limited to 5 pages.
  • Proposals should be submitted in PDF form via email to Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu, CA 441, 278-6970).

Criteria: Applications will be judged on 1) the significance and quality of the research project; 2) the clarity of stated objectives and details of methodology; 3) the feasibility of the project relative to funding requested and time frame; and 4) potential for future funding and/or for completion of the project. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Peer Review Meeting: Although not required, it is strongly suggested that applicants meet with Edith Millikan and/or Associate Dean Jeffrey Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) for an informal peer review of the proposal. We will provide feedback on how well your proposal meets the criteria discussed above, and provide assistance with drafting your budget.

The Application

The application consists of a cover sheet (appended as the last page of this document, a five-page project plan with budget, and a 4-page CV. These may be submitted as a single PDF document, or separate PDFs.

Cover sheet with title, amount requested, signatures of the applicant and the applicant’s departmental chair, and an indication of other applications for funding (this will not penalize this application). This is not included in the 5-page limit. Your email submission serves as your signature on the application form. Your department chair’s electronic signature occurs by copying her or him on your email submission.

Project Plan (Limited to 5 pages) Please use the following outline. Give sufficient detail for each outline item to indicate a well-thought out plan, including tasks, to accomplish the project.

  • Purpose and Significance of the research, creative activity or scholarship, including brief review of the relevant scholarly literature and what your research will add to the body of literature (Criterion #1)
  • The Specific Objectives of the project (Criterion #2)
  • Work Plan, Methods and Materials (Criteria #2 and #3)

o   Describe the work that will be conducted during the summer for which you seek funding. Include, as applicable, tasks you will perform to accomplish your objectives; data sources and/or archival collections you will use; data collection methods if relevant; other participants who will be involved (if any) and their roles on the project; location where work will take place if off campus; and manuscript preparation activities.

  • Timeline for the Activities (Criteria #2 and #3)
  • Evaluation Process and Plans for Dissemination (Criteria #1, #2, #3, and #4)

o   Describe how you will evaluate the success of your objectives and the analysis performed.

o   Describe your plans for disseminating the results of your research: Conference paper, scholarly article, presentation, etc.

  • Connection of this Project to Future Research, including prospects or plans for external funding (Criterion #4)
  • Budget and Rationale explaining the proposed use of funds (Criterion #3)

o   Describe the type of expense you wish covered, i.e., salary and fringe benefits, hourly student assistance, travel, data purchase, publications to assist your research, photocopying, rights and permissions, etc.

CV, limited to 4 pages. Please tailor the CV to the proposed project. Please limit your publication list to those most relevant to your proposed project. Limit the sections on teaching and service activity as room permits.

Notification: A sub-committee of the Research Advisory Committee will evaluate proposals and notify applicants by Friday, April 5, 2013.

Final Report: Recipients will be expected to file a report on their research or creative activities by Friday, December 6, 2013. Please mark this on your calendars!

 

Click here for forms: SLA 2013 Research and Creative Activity Grant

IUPUI Arts & Humanities Workshop: Research Commercialization, Intellectual Property, and Entrepreneurship

When: Thursday, February 28, 2013 | 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
Where: University Library, Room 1126

IUPUI faculty and students from across the disciplines are involved in innovative and exciting research projects — some of which might lead to inventions, technologies, software programs, or businesses.  This workshop introduces faculty and students to the basics of research commercialization, intellectual property, and entrepreneurship in the IU system.

Representatives from the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the IU Research and Technology Corporation will outline the steps from research idea to commercial implementation in this informative session.  They will answer such questions as: What are IU’s intellectual property policies? Should my software be open source or proprietary? Are there other researchers or community partners that can help me develop my idea? How do I translate my university research into a commercial product?

Click here to register

Save the Date: 2013 IUPUI Research Day: APRIL 5, 2013

Save the Date: 2013 IUPUI Research Day: APRIL 5, 2013

On April 5, 2013 the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research will host the 2013 IUPUI Research Day. This open house celebrates the cutting-edge and multifaceted research and scholarly activities of IUPUI. This full day event will be held at the IUPUI Campus Center.

Research Day provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, their academic, industrial, and governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, to explore new collaborations, and to lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Click here to register. More details will be announced in upcoming Research Enterprise issues.

Fellowship: Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14

Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange
Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14

Applications due by 1 November 2012

Water has long been a significant means for the movement of goods and people. Sophisticated networks, at a variety of scales, were established in antiquity around the Mediterranean and the Black Seas, and later in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Together with sporadic and accidental encounters, these networks fostered commerce in raw materials and finished objects, along with the exchange of ideas and cultural concepts. Far from being barriers, seas and oceans were vital links connecting cultures. The 2013–2014 academic year at the Getty Research Institute and Getty Villa will be devoted to exploring the art-historical impact of maritime transport.

How has the desire for specific commodities from overseas shaped social, political, and religious institutions? How has the introduction of foreign materials and ideas transformed local artistic traditions, and what novel forms and practices have developed from trade and other exchanges, both systematic and informal? What role do the objects born of these interactions have in enhancing cultural understandings or perpetuating misunderstandings? How has the rapidly accelerating pace of exchange in recent years influenced cross-cultural developments? The goal of this research theme is to explore how bodies of water have served, and continue to facilitate, a rich and complex interchange in the visual arts.

The Getty Research Institute and the Getty Villa invite proposals focusing on artistic exchange and the transmission of knowledge across bodies of water from ancient times to the present day. Scholars actively engaged in studying the role of artists, patrons, priests, merchants, and explorers in oceanic exchange are encouraged to apply, and projects focusing on the Pacific are particularly welcome.

More details: http://www.getty.edu/research/scholars/years/future.html