Global Archaeologies and Cultural Landscapes in Northern Europe

In the foreground, the Keminmaa Old St. Michael’s Church was built between 1519-21. Besides being a fascinating medieval building, it holds one of the most interesting spectacles in northern Finland: when Lutheran priest Nikolaus Rungius died in 1629 he was buried under the church and is on display in the church floor today. The church in the background, the new Saint Michael’s, was built in 1827.

In the foreground, the Keminmaa Old St. Michael’s Church was built between 1519-21. Besides being a fascinating medieval building, it holds one of the most interesting spectacles in northern Finland: when Lutheran priest Nikolaus Rungius died in 1629 he was buried under the church and is on display in the church floor today. The church in the background, the new Saint Michael’s, was built in 1827.

I knew absolutely nothing about Finland in November, 2010: I had the general impression that Finland was a snow-covered tundra peopled by reindeer and cross-country skiers. That changed at a conference in Scotland where I met some historical archaeologists from northern Finland, and their research on material life on the northernmost colonial reaches of Europe itself was fascinating and ambitious. I was keen to develop an international dimension to my research on the emergence of consumer culture, and Finland was a compelling if unexpected comparison to Indianapolis: my Finnish colleagues at the University of Oulu championed an historical archaeology of Finland that encompassed medieval trading centers, a rich history as Swedish and then Russian territories, and a 20th century heritage that witnessed independence, a civil war, and a distinctive if not unique World War II experience.

In 2011 I submitted an IUPUI Arts and Humanities Initiative Travel and Resource Support Grant to explore the material evidence of emergent capitalism in Finland over three centuries. Oulu is one of the world’s northernmost urban centers, a subarctic community settled by the Swedes in 1605 but part of a region in which people have lived for millennia. The grant proposal simply aspired to meet with my Finnish colleagues, inspect their excavated collections, share my own research, and perhaps craft a collaborative project in a discipline that is overwhelmingly focused on North America. The grant had a sound research agenda, but it also left some room to listen to my Finnish colleagues tell me what is important about their scholarship and heritage, and it allowed me to listen to my own curiosity.

The heart of my visit to Oulu was simply seeing the place, visiting the archaeological sites, and looking at the rich material culture the Finns had excavated from regional sites. One of the sites they had excavated was a merchant’s home in Oulu that burnt in a town-wide 1822 blaze. The merchant’s household contained an astoundingly massive assemblage of English ceramics that had been intended for trade in Oulu and into Arctic Lapland and east to Russia. During my Arts and Humanities grant visit we did some material analysis and started a paper on the assemblage that examined marketing and consumption on the margins of Europe. The paper compared the Finnish assemblage to marketplace patterns in the Atlantic World, which were in some ways very similar and in others quite different. That paper, “The Creamware Revolution on the Northern European Periphery: Creamware Marketing in 19th Century Northern Finland,” has since been published in 2013 in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology.

What may have been most important about the Finland trip were the projects that have followed despite not being part of the original research design: We subsequently have published a series of papers on colonial landscape surveillance, World War II landscapes, and medieval marketing, all of which would never have been research questions for me if I had not ventured beyond Indianapolis. The Arts and Humanities project provided sufficient preliminary research to support a Fulbright Finland proposal, and I received a Fulbright Scholar and returned to the University of Oulu in Fall 2012. I became a Docent in American Historical Archaeology at the University of Oulu in Fall 2013, an associate faculty appointment; my colleague Timo Ylimaunu is now an International Scholar at IUPUI.

It turns out that Finland is indeed covered by snow for much of the year and has lots of reindeer and skiers, but there were lots of intellectual and cultural surprises. Oulu, for instance, is home to the Air Guitar World Championships, whose astoundingly cheeky ambition is “to promote world peace – according to Air Guitar ideology, wars will end, climate change stops and all bad things disappear if all the people in the world play the Air Guitar”; at the edge of the Arctic Circle, Rovaniemi todays bills itself as the home of Santa Claus, with numerous Kris Kringles entertaining a host of tourists; and the legion of saunas covering the Finnish landscape are profoundly consequential cultural spaces and not simply sweaty showers. Much of what the grant aspired to do was successful, but some of the longer term research implications probably came from the experience of having good local colleagues and a bit of IUPUI support to start the project at all.

 

Paul R. Mullins is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at IUPUI; Past-President of the Society for Historical Archaeology; and author of The Archaeology of Consumer Culture and Race and Affluence: An Archaeology of African America. For more on his research see his blog Archaeology and Material Culture.

 

In Search of Annie Parker

UntitledThanks to support from the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the IU New Currents program, and several campus offices and departments as well as Indiana Humanities (the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities), the Frederick Douglass Papers will sponsor a gathering of scholars, teachers, students, and the general public to examine the historical and literary significance of Douglass’s novella, “The Heroic Slave” (1853), on our campus in October.

In preparation for this symposium, several members of the Douglass Papers staff have been engaged in a small piece of literary detective work. Douglass’s “Heroic Slave” was originally published as a contribution to the short “gift book” entitled Autographs for Freedom, published in Boston by the firm of John P. Jewitt. Besides Douglass, this collection of essays, poems, and short fiction features many well-known mid-nineteenth century writers and political and reform leaders including Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Sumner, Horace Greeley, John G. Whittier, and Caroline Dall.

Among the diverse collection of black and white, male and female, American and British contributors to Autographs is the writer Annie Parker who published a poem “Story Telling” and the separate story, “Passages in the Life of a Slave Woman.” In the latter, the narrator, a slave woman, recounts the tragic outcome of a master/slave sexual relationship. In the past few decades this piece has been anthologized several times as one of the earliest works of fiction by an African American author. But who was Annie Parker? None of the anthologies or scholars writing about the story have ever been able to supply any biographical details about her.

Project assistant editor Jeffrey Duvall, graduate research assistant Rebecca Pattillo, and I have been at work trying to answer that question this summer. Frederick Douglass’s own Rochester-published newspaper contains a piece under Parker’s byline in the early 1850s and two other short journalistic pieces by her appear in a Geneva, New York-based temperance newspaper in that same era. Then the trail gets cold, very cold.

Genealogical sources turn up a few possible “Annie Parkers” in the upstate New York region but none of them has any known connection to the antislavery movement and all were white. Perhaps Annie Parker was not a runaway slave as others have speculated. This raises the possibility that “Annie Parker” was a pen name–but whose?

The most intriguing possibility is that Parker is none other than Harriet Jacobs, the author of the famous 1859 autobiography of her horrifyingly abusive career as a South Carolina slave. Jacobs had escaped slavery in the early 1840s and worked as a maid for the Massachusetts journalist Nathaniel Parker Willis, who is referred to twice obtusely in Parker’s own writings. In 1849-50, two years before the publication of the Autographs, Jacobs lived in Rochester and actually worked in the same building where Douglass edited his newspaper. While Jacobs had returned to working for Willis in Massachusetts by the time Autographs was compiled, those earlier connections might have led the gift book’s editor, Julia Griffiths, to have solicited a piece by Jacobs, although no evidence of such a solicitation has yet been found. The same year, Harriet Beecher Stowe also asked Jacobs to write a summary of her slave experiences to include in her Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a response to critics of her condemnation of slave mistreatment in her earlier novel. The Douglass staff is exploring whether Jacobs might have wanted to tell her personal story herself in a safer fictional form in the pages of Autographs.

The product of this research will just be a small part of the upcoming symposium, where Douglass papers staff will be joined by seven widely-published scholars from several disciplines to explore various contexts of “the Heroic Slave.” The event is free and open to the public and we hope will be well-attended by many persons from the central Indiana community interested in Frederick Douglass and his campaign against slavery.

by Jack Kaufman-McKivigan

35th Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting hosted by IUPUI

voteRights, Riots, and Reactions

In the year 2015 we focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo,the Battle of New Orleans,the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I,the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Brian Dirck,Professor of History, Anderson University, will provide the keynote address. His first book,“Lincoln and Davis:Imagining America,1809-1865,”offered a comparative analysis of the two Civil War presidents’ lives and careers. He has since focused most of his attention on Abraham Lincoln. His publications include “Lincoln the Lawyer,”an overview of Lincoln’s legal career that was awarded the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Abraham Lincoln in 2007. In 2012 he published “Lincoln and the Constitution,”as part of the Concise Lincoln Library Series,and “Lincoln and White America,”an analysis of Lincoln’s views concerning white supremacy and racism.

2015 IAH Annual Meeting Call for Papers

The Indiana Association of Historians (IAH) invites papers and panel proposals for its annual meeting to be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis,Indiana,on February 28,2015.

While papers and panels from all fields and related to all topics of history are welcomed,the program committee is particularly interested in proposals that focus on civil rights,not only in the context of United States history,but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo,the Battle of New Orleans,the Congress of Vienna,the end of the Civil War,the passage of the 13th amendment,World War I,the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights),the end of World War II,and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Events leading up to these milestones and reaction to them are also encouraged as the basis of papers.

The committee also welcomes submissions in the fields of K-12 history education and public history. Academic,public,and independent historians,as well as graduate students,are eligible to present papers. All presenters must be present at the conference.

Conference papers (approximately 10 pages/2,500 words) may be based on original research,synthesis of scholarship,or participant experience. Sessions will consist of two or three papers with comments.

To submit a proposal for a paper and/or session,send a one-page proposal for each presentation and a one-page c.v. Panel proposals should include a one-page proposal,which specifies the topic each participant will discuss,and a one-page c.v. per participant.

The deadline for submitting paper and/or session proposals is November 10,2014. E-mail submissions are encouraged and will be accepted until the deadline.

Founded in 1980,the IAH is the statewide organization of historians with a mission to furnish opportunities for persons within the state’s historical community to become acquainted,to share research and ideas,to promote and strengthen the historical profession,and to encourage the pursuit of history by the general public. IAH members include historians who live or work in Indiana and specialize in various fields of history,not just Indiana history. Visit iahwebsite.org for membership information.

Submit proposals to:
IAH Program 2015
c/o IAH president, Nancy Conner
1500 N. Delaware Street,Indianapolis,IN 46202
Email:nconner@indianahumanities.org

APS Franklin Research Grants, including APS/British Academy Fellowship for Research in London and APS/Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities Fellowship for Research in Edinburgh

UntitledThe Franklin program offers up to $6,000 to scholars for one to two months research.  It is particularly designed to help meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses. In addition to the general grants, there are two specific programs for research in London or in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Deadlines

October 1, for a January 2015 decision for work in February 2015 through January 2016
December 1, for a March 2015 decision for work in April 2015 through January 2016

The Franklin grants are made to individuals, rather than to Indiana University on behalf of the scholar, so they will pay awardees directly. Even though it is not necessary to route proposals through the IU Office of Research Administration, please notify Associate Dean Jeff Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) and Grants Analyst Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu) if you intend to apply. For more information on the School of Liberal Arts procedure for fellowship applications, please visit our website.

For more information on the Franklin Grant click here

Fellowship Opportunities at the Huntington

huntington logoHuntington Fellowships

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

                                               Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

 The Huntington, an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine, maintains a collection of manuscripts that date from the eleventh century up to the present. This collection includes 7 million manuscripts, 420,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Special collections include those on the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence. Applicants can apply for only a short-term or long-term award during this fellowship cycle. Applicants may also submit an application for a travel grant or exchange fellowship, but they must provide a separate application with distinct cover sheet and project description, as these awards are reviewed by a separate committee.

Huntington Fellowship

The Huntington Fellowships provides doctoral level scholars or graduate students who have reached the dissertation phase $3,000 per month for one to five months between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. The majority of these awards will be given to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library, though there are specialized fellowships available including the Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England; the Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas; the Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering ; the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships; and the Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships
These fellowships provide $50,000 over a nine to twelve month fellowship between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 for U.S. scholars who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain
The Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships provide for a U.S. based scholar who holds a PhD or equivalent or is a doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage travel to England, Scotland, or Wales between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. In addition to research that will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain, the Huntington also offers exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Terms for the exchange fellowships and travel grants are as follows:

1. Linacre College, Oxford – A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2015; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

2. Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall – Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

3. Travel Grants – The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2015, and no later than June 30, 2016.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
This fellowship is for nine to twelve months with a stipend of $50,000 between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. This fellowship will support individuals who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014.

Funding Opportunities for Research Commercialization and Economic Success (FORCES)

imagesThe FORCES program is designed to support IUPUI researchers in the successful transformation of their research findings into commercially viable outcomes. The key goals of FORCES are to support: 1) realization of short-term projects that will enhance commercial value of IUPUI intellectual property assets, by facilitating commercialization of inventions, technologies, or other intellectual property derived from existing research projects, and 2) development of research initiatives that show great promise for commercialization of the research outcomes. The next RTR application deadline is September 15, 2014For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://research.iupui.edu/funding/.

NSF Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

NationalScienceFoundationIU Internal Deadline: 11/12/2014
NSF Proposal Deadline: 2/17/2015
Brief Description:
Accepts proposals for innovative research projects to foster ethical STEM research in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.
Proposed research should seek to provide answers to the following: What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?’ Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or membership in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility or humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a culture of academic integrity? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, or integrated into other research and learning settings?
Successful proposals will include a comparative dimension, either 1) between or within institutional settings that differ along the factors suggested or other factors, or 2) Institutional Transformation (IT) awards, where the comparison is over time– before and after an intervention. For IT, investigators are expected to gather and report baseline data in the first annual report. (See the reporting section of this solicitation for additional reporting requirements for both types of awards).
Award Amount:
·         The anticipated funding amount each year is $3,050,000 for an estimated 6-8 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 5 years.
·         Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.
·         Cost Sharing Requirements: Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
Eligibility:
NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy.
Limitation: One per University
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 12, 2014 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.
·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean
·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)
IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Mack Center Call for Fellowship Applications

facet-full-logoThe Mack Center enhances teaching by advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Administered by FACET, the center stimulates inquiry in SoTL, promotes the results of those inquiries, and fosters educational excellence at Indiana University and internationally.

The Mack Center:
Supports SoTL research by Mack Fellows and other faculty to develop highly effective, evidence-based strategies for enhancing teaching and learning; sponsors conferences, workshops, and publications that develop faculty members’ and graduate students’ teaching skills and share knowledge about SoTL; nurtures the growth of university, state, and global communities of teacher-scholars; and collaborates with people and programs worldwide–including FACET initiatives such as the Future Faculty Teaching Fellows Summer Institute and journals–to advance the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

FELLOWSHIPS

Become a Mack Fellow
Each year the Mack Center selects a group of fellows to conduct ambitious research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and to participate in our community of SoTL scholars.

Mack Fellows receive $1000 in initial research funds and $1000 after they complete their project and submit a paper to a scholarly journal.

For the complete call for submissions, follow this link: https://facet.indiana.edu/about/mack-center/call-for-mack-fellow.pdf

If you need additional information, contact, Beth Kern, at (574) 520-4352 or bkern@iusb.edu

FACET
755 W. Michigan Street, UL 1180, Indianapolis, IN 46202
https://facet.indiana.edu/

What matters. Where it matters.
Indiana University

IU joins new education technology services partnership

unizin-logo1Indiana University has joined with three other leading U.S. research universities to form the Unizin consortium to provide a suite of services for courses, online learning and big data analytics aimed at significantly improving the way educational content is shared across institutions and ultimately delivered to students.

Unizin, a partnership among IU, Colorado State University, the University of Florida and the University of Michigan, will provide a common technological infrastructure that will allow member universities to work locally and together to strengthen their traditional missions of education and research using the most innovative digital technology available today.

“Leading universities are continuously working to enhance the great value of both a residential and a digital education,” said Brad Wheeler, vice president for information technology and chief information officer at Indiana University.

“By coming together to create Unizin, IU and our partners are ensuring a cost-efficient path for the best tools to serve students whether resident, online or through education to our many alumni.

“And just as universities created Internet2 nearly two decades ago to serve our research mission, the founding universities — with others to join soon — are creating Unizin to serve our educational mission by empowering our faculty with the best tools. The Unizin consortium is an extensible and scalable collaboration that is anchored in the deepest and best values of the academy to advance highly effective education.”

For instructors, Unizin will provide powerful content storing and sharing services that give faculty greater control and options over the use of their intellectual property. Their courses can span residential, online, badges or MOOC delivery models from a single software service.

Students will benefit by gaining access to course materials from some of the best minds in higher education in formats that best serve their individual needs — from massive open online courses (MOOCs) and flipped classrooms, where lectures are given online and class time is reserved for discussion and group work, to traditional in-person courses.

The tools and services eventually provided through Unizin also will allow partner institutions to collect and analyze large amounts of data on student performance within the policies of the member universities. These analytics will enable faculty researchers to gain valuable insight into the ways students best learn, thus shaping future approaches to teaching.

IU discussions around the concept of Unizin began more than a year ago following President Michael A. McRobbie’s announcement of the creation of IU Online in 2012. The consortium is being formed to enable individual campus learning strategies and approaches that are powered by the scale gained from the joint capabilities of leading universities for digital education.

“With Unizin, Indiana University is once again at the forefront of the digital revolution in higher education,” said Barbara Bichelmeyer, executive associate vice president for university academic and regional campus affairs and senior director of IU’s Office of Online Education. “Unizin combines the power of platform, content and analytics so we will be able to better share the great work of our faculty across all of our campuses and provide the high-quality courses people expect from IU at greater scale, while improving economies of scale.”

Each investing institution has signed the Unizin charter and committed $1 million over the next three years to develop and shape the shared services. These combined investments will provide a more efficient path to providing educational services than one-off investments by each institution.

Unizin has been created as an unincorporated association within Internet2, a leading not-for-profit global technology organization with more than 500 member institutions across the higher education, government and business communities. The Unizin platform will be delivered over the ultra-high-speed national research and education network operated by Internet2 on behalf of the U.S. research university members.

Unizin will operate under the direction of a soon-to-be-named chief executive officer, who will report to a board of directors comprising representatives from each of the investing member universities as well as Internet2. As a services-providing organization, Unizin will operate with a professional staff and contracts for evolving services.

“The intent of Unizin is to create a community, akin to Internet2, of like-minded institutions who are willing to invest time and resources into creating a service grounded in openness and collaboration that will allow all members to leverage the tremendous power of today’s digital technologies,” said James Hilton, dean of libraries and vice provost for digital education at the University of Michigan. “Unizin is a service organization in support of its members, and in that spirit, we look forward to welcoming additional members to the Unizin consortium.”

Canvas selected as Unizin learning management system platform

As part of its launch, Unizin has selected Canvas by Instructure to provide a common learning management system for use by member institutions. Canvas is a cloud-based technology platform that provides a wide range of functions associated with university classroom administration, including assignments, grading, student-teacher communication, collaborative learning tools and more.

Unizin members will receive access to Canvas as part of the Unizin service. The Unizin partners selected Canvas in large part because of its commitment to implementing IMS Global open standards and to providing most of its system as open-source software. These values and partnership align well with Unizin’s commitment to both speed in execution and open standards that can help further universities’ missions over time.

“We are excited to have witnessed the formation of Unizin,” said Joel Dehlin, chief technology officer at Instructure. “This team of CIOs and institutions are open, progressive, data-loving and passionate about user adoption — the very things that drive the engineering and product teams at Canvas.”

“Canvas is the first of many technology-related services that Unizin plans to provide to its members that will allow them to take greater control over how the content universities create is used and shared,” said Stacy Morrone, associate professor of educational psychology and associate vice president for learning technologies. “These tools, along with faculty-led research, can enable greater insight from learner analytics that will lead to improved student outcomes.”

Canvas was made available to all IU campuses in April, and Unizin services begin July 1. Teams among the founding and prospective institutions have been meeting to shape additional Unizin services for the next year.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Fellowships

Woodrow-Wilson-International-Center-for-ScholarsThrough an international competition, the Center offers residential fellowships. Fellows conduct research and write in their areas of interest, while interacting with policymakers in Washington and Wilson Center staff. The center accepts non-advocacy, policy-relevant, fellowship proposals that address key challenges of past, present, and future issues confronting the United States and the world.  The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars aims to unite the world of ideas to the world of policy by supporting preeminent scholarship and linking that scholarship to issues of concern to officials in Washington. The Wilson Center invites scholars, practitioners, journalists, and public intellectuals to take part in its flagship fellowship program and to take advantage of the opportunity to engage actively in the center’s national mission. Fellows will be affiliated with one of the Wilson Center programs/projects and are encouraged to interact with policy makers in Washington, D.C. as well as with Wilson Center staff who are working on similar research and topics.

The center awards approximately 20-22 residential fellowships annually. The center tries to ensure that the stipend provided under the fellowship, together with the fellow’s other sources of funding (e.g., grants secured by the applicant and sabbatical allowances), approximate a fellow’s regular salary. Stipends provided in recent years have ranged from $26,000 to $85,000 (the maximum possible). Stipends include round trip travel for fellows. If spouses and/or dependent children will reside with the fellow for the entire fellowship period, money for their travel will also be included in the stipend. In addition to stipends, the center provides 75 percent of health insurance premiums for fellows who elect center coverage and for their accompanying family members. Fellows are expected to be in residence for the entire U.S. academic year (early September through May, i.e., nine months), although a few fellowships are occasionally awarded for shorter periods with a minimum of four months.

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/fellowship-application-guidelines

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