Five new centers awarded Signature Centers Initiative grants

INDIANAPOLIS — One team of scientists is searching for an innovative repair strategy for human spinal cord and brain injuries. Another is looking for cures for the “wasting away,” imagesexperienced by patients with cancer, congestive heart failure, AIDS and other underlying diseases.

Both are the recipients of a grant from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to establish their research centers as viable units whose work will translate into better understanding of disease and the development of better cures and treatments.

The two groups are among five research center teams awarded development funding in Round 8 of the IUPUI Signature Centers initiative Program.

“This is the eighth year that we have been running this internal grant program, and I congratulate the new centers that have been selected for funding,” Kody Varahramyan, IUPUI vice chancellor for research, said.

“The Signature Centers Initiative has become a key cornerstone of the IUPUI research enterprise, playing an important role in enhancing research and scholarly activity, while fostering the development of research centers that are addressing important national and global needs, and contributing to economic and social well-being,” Varahramyan said.

Two of the five centers selected in the latest round have received Category A (three-year) funding:

Center for Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research, Xiao-Ming Xu, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To understand molecular mechanisms underlying traumatic spinal cord and brain injuries and to develop innovative repair strategies that can be translated to clinical treatments of these diseases in a timely and responsive fashion.

Indiana Center for AIDS Research, Samir Gupta, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To develop internal infrastructure to facilitate novel collaborations among researchers that will lead to improving access to care for all HIV/AIDS patients; and improving retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy especially for racial and sexual minorities.

The other three centers have received Category B (one-year) funding for planning purposes:

Center for Aerial Unmanned Systems Imaging, Dan Johnson, director, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Focus: non-military applications of unmanned aerial systems (drone) technology such as remote imaging for water quality, mosquito habitat mapping, disaster preparation and precision agriculture; and the utilization and analysis of data collected with unmanned aerial systems.

Institute for Product Lifecycle Innovation, Hazim El-Mounayri, director, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. Focus: the promotion and management of product lifecycle practice in advanced manufacturing and life science applications in order for American industries to remain competitive in the global market; to serve as a test bed and vehicle for the rapid implementation of advanced product liability tests, digital manufacturing and designing.

Center for Cachexia Research Innovation and Therapy, Teresa Zimmers, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: U.S. multi-investigator cachexia (involuntary weight loss) research center will support development of interdisciplinary, multi-investigator collaborations through meetings, a research retreat and the development of a regional consortium with Ohio State University; and center will invest in a thematic research program on cardiopulmonary effects in tobacco-associated cancer cachexias.

The IUPUI Signature Centers Initiative fosters the development of centers that are unique to IUPUI and that can lead the way in world-class research and creative activities, and make a difference in the lives of people. The initiative provides each selected center with initial funding for a period of one to three years. The centers are re-evaluated at the end of three years and if approved, receive a five-year designation as an IUPUI Signature Center.

Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission,, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward,, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL:

RESEARCH NOTICE: NEH Summer Stipends – Limited Submission

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to NEH Logohumanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
· projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
· projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
· specific policy studies;
· research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
· the preparation or revision of textbooks;
· curriculum development;
· the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
· educational or technical impact assessments;
· empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
· inventories of collections;
· the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
· the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
· works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

· Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
· Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
· See Program details for more specific information.

Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
· emeritus faculty; and
· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.

Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon.
The narrative limitation does not include references.
Limited Submission URL:

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

IUPUI Honors Scholars to showcase research, service-learning accomplishments

INDIANAPOLIS — Student pursuits in undergraduate research, international study and honorsservice learning will take the spotlight next week during Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ annual presentation of accomplishments of high-ability students.

The Fifth Annual Honors College Student Showcase takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the lower lobby of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Honors College Showcase is one of my favorite events for the college,” said Honors College Dean Jane Luzar. “It not only demonstrates the range of activities our scholars pursue but also the passion and excellence our students devote to these efforts.”

Morgan Moran is among the 26 IUPUI Honors Scholars who, using posters, live performances, media and other creative presentations, will showcase their recent accomplishments in the areas of research, art, design, visual communication, business solutions, service learning and community engagement and international experiences.

Moran, a psychology major, spent a week doing crafts and other activities with children in an orphanage in Costa Rica. She has captured the excitement of that life-changing service-learning experience in a short video that she’ll present at the showcase.

The spring break trip to Costa Rica was a confidence-builder for Moran who, in addition to maintaining a rigorous academic schedule, spends three hours per week working with children at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, volunteering 300 hours of service since her freshman year at IUPUI.

She looks forward to sharing video footage and still photographs from her international experience.

Moran and other students say Honors College projects and programming have allowed them to build relationships with people from different walks of life, have provided funds and opportunities for study abroad, and have increased their campus engagement.

Showcase presenters include:

Dorothy Slover, art education sophomore, who will display a collection of books, drawings, paintings and other original art. Most of her work has been independent art exploration. But when she begins her student teaching in the fall, she will build lesson plans around her creations, starting with art books like the ones in her showcase presentation.
Jeffery Joll, biomedical engineering junior, who has spent two years studying bone biology in an IU School of Medicine lab, first as an intern and now as a part-time research assistant. He will present a poster display of research that in the long term could lead to more successful therapy for people with brittle bone disease or osteoarthritis.

Indiana University launches search for new vice president for research

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A search committee has been formed to identify candidates for 225910_w296the position of Indiana University vice president for research, the university has announced.

Bernice Pescosolido, Distinguished Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, and David B. Burr, associate vice chancellor for research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will co-chair the 18-member committee. The group includes faculty, administrators and students representing IU’s Bloomington, Indianapolis and regional campuses.

The new vice president will succeed Jorge José, who will step down when his five-year appointment ends July 31, 2015. José will serve as Rudy Professor of Physics at IU Bloomington and a member of the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at the IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

To build on the success achieved by José, the committee will conduct an internal search within Indiana University. It will make its recommendations to McRobbie. The university hopes to have a new vice president identified by the time José steps down.

José oversaw an 18 percent increase in federally funded research by Indiana University faculty members in his first four years as vice president for research. The strategic plan for research at IU, the development of which was overseen by his office, helped shape IU’s bicentennial strategic priorities approved by the IU Board of Trustees in December 2014.

He also prioritized efforts to decrease the administrative burden on researchers through increased efficiency, including the implementation of new grants administration software and of an online research compliance review system that greatly reduced turnaround times for research protocols.

Pescosolido, in addition to her Department of Sociology appointment, is director of the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research. Burr is also a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering in the IUPUI School of Engineering and Technology.

The vice president for research works with various university offices, campus leaders and deans to increase and diversify research and creative works at IU, attract external funding and develop public-private partnerships, technology transfer, graduate education and intercampus research opportunities.

In addition to being responsible for research administration and research compliance, the vice president oversees and is responsible for the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at IUPUI.

More information about the search is available online.

Call for 2015 IUPUI Research Day Poster Abstracts

imagesResearch Day, April 17, 2015, provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, and their academic, industrial, governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, explore new collaborations, and lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Faculty, post doctoral fellow, professional student, graduate student and staff poster presentations are coordinated by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.


  • Abstracts will be competitively selected for poster presentation on the basis of scholarship, research and creative activity
  • There is no limit on the number of abstracts you may submit, but only one will be accepted
  • Accepted abstracts will be published as received on the Research Day website unless specified otherwise on the submission page. Ensure you have permission to publish!
  • Poster sessions are 90 minutes
  • Presenters are responsible for setting up and taking down posters at designated times
  • Posters may be landscape or portrait and approximately 36” x 60”. Backer boards 40”x 60” are provided, as are easels and push pins
  • Display tables and electrical outlets are available for select presenters and must be pre-approved
  • Have 2-3 minutes of talking points prepared to “present” your work as attendees view your poster

Abstract Format
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

  • No limit on title length
  • List authors and their affiliations in the style appropriate for your discipline
  • Center justify the heading
  • The abstract should be no more than one page

These abstracts are due March 23, 2015. Applicants will be notified of the status of their submission after March 27, 2015.

Submit your abstract here

Fellowship Opportunity at Washington College and John Carter Brown Library

Brown University's John Carter Brown Library.  Image taken from

Brown University’s John Carter Brown Library.

The C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the John Carter Brown Library invite applications for the Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Fellowship, a unique research and writing fellowship. The deadline for applications for the 2015-2016 Hodson-Brown Fellowship is March 15, 2015.

The Hodson Trust – John Carter Brown Fellowship supports academics, independent scholars, writers, filmmakers, novelists and artists working on significant projects relating to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830.

Fellowship award: $20,000 plus housing and university privileges

Duration: two months of research in Providence, RI (any time between September and May) and two months of writing in Chestertown, Md. (any time between May and August)

Residence: In Providence, a private room in the John Carter Brown Library’s Fellows’ Residence; in Chestertown, exclusive occupancy of a restored circa-1735 house.

Work space: In Providence, space in the John Carter Brown Library; in Chestertown, a private office in the circa-1745 waterfront Custom House, home of the Starr Center

Deadline for 2015-2016:March 15, 2015

Further information and criteria:

Questions may be directed

Developing Diverse Researchers with InVestigative Expertise (DRIVE) Applications Available Now

imagesThe DRIVE program is designed to enhance the diversity and research and creative activity mission of IUPUI. Faculty from historically underrepresented populations, usually defined as African-American, Latino-American, Native American, Pacific Islanders, and women are particularly encouraged to apply. The DRIVE program supports projects that have the potential for sustainability through external funding.

Deadline: March 2, 2015 (SLA Internal Deadline February 23), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application