Tag Archive for research

8th annual Museum Studies Portfolio Night

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IUPUI Museum Studies students will share highlights from their Master’s degree E-portfolios. Please come support the newest members of the museum field.

A central feature of our Master’s program is that learning is integrally connected with doing. Students work in collaborative projects with community partners throughout their coursework and internships. At the end of their program MA students develop an electronic portfolio compiling highlights of their work and presenting it in a way that helps communicate who they are as emerging museum professionals, what they can and want to do in the field, and why they are committing themselves to the work that museums do in their communities.

For more information, visit the Museum Studies Program website or contact Rebecca Ellis rsmallma@iupui.edu.

New Frontiers grants in the Arts and Humanities awarded to IU faculty

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Thirty-two faculty members from six IU campuses have been awarded grants for their projects in arts and humanities through Indiana University’s 2013-14 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.

In 2014, New Frontiers enters its 10th year of supporting IU faculty in the arts and humanities. Initially funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc. starting in 2004, funding for New Frontiers was continued by IU President Michael A. McRobbie in 2010. The program is overseen and administered by IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Over the past 10 years, the New Frontiers program has awarded funding to more than 680 IU faculty members. In the current round, funded projects include solo art installations, photography exhibitions, electronic music compositions, a book-length manuscript on painting in the 21st century and a symposium on the intersection between intellectual property and the arts.

“We’re very pleased to be able to continue to fund such a rich array of arts and humanities projects,” Vice President for Research Jorge José said. “The New Frontiers program is a unique opportunity for our faculty members, and we are very appreciative of President McRobbie’s commitment to supporting outstanding scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities.”

Currently, the New Frontiers program offers three types of grants: major awards of up to $50,000 (New Frontiers); smaller awards of up to $20,000 for workshops, symposia or small conferences (New Currents); and fellowships of up to $3,000 to support faculty travel (Exploratory Travel Fellowships).

The 2013-14 New Frontiers grant recipients are:
New Frontiers Grants
  • Blane De St. Croix, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “‘Dead Ice’ Production/Exhibition”
  • Jennifer Fleissner, English, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Maladies of the Will: Literature as a Symptomatology of Modernity”
  • Laura Foster, gender studies, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law, Benefit Sharing and Identity in Southern Africa”
  • John Gibson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “In Flight: a Composition for Chorus and Electronics”
  • Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Digital Scholarly Companion to ‘In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen’
  • Jeffrey Hass, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Contemporary Dance-Based Multimedia Work With Original Computer Music”
  • Susan Hyatt, anthropology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Between the National and the Local: The British Community Development Projects and the Creation of New Knowledge”
  • Herbert Timothy Lovelace, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “The World Is On Our Side: The Black Freedom Movement and the U.S. Origins of the U.N. Race Convention”
  • Robert Meyer-Lee, English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, IU South Bend: “Valuing Middle English Literature Across the Divide: Literary Value in Chaucer, Langland, Audelay and Lydgate”
  • Osamu Nakagawa, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “Memorial: Tracing the Past”
  • Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Rethinking Painting in the 21st Century”
  • Meredith Setser, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Agricultura Aesthetics”
  • Erich Holt Stem, music, School of Arts and Letters, IU Southeast: “America By: A Symphony Tour”
  • Eva White, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Who Is Irish? Roddy Doyle’s Hyphenated Identities”
  • Jeffrey Wolin, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, and Andrew Lumsdaine, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington: “The Art of Plenoptics: A Collaboration”
New Currents Grants
  • Konstantin Dierks, history, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Symposium: Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861”
  • Mark David Janis, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “Intellectual Property and the Performing Arts Symposium”
  • John Kaufman-McKivigan, history, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Frederick Douglass’s The Heroic Slave and the American Revolutionary Tradition: A Scholarly Symposium”
Exploratory Travel Fellowships
  • Julie Belz, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Re-conceptualizing Intercultural Communicative Competence”
  • Dennis Bingham, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Bob Fosse and the Revisionist Film Musical”
  • Matthew Bradley, political science, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Politics and Motivating the Next Generation of Public Servants”
  • Alisa Clapp-Intyre, English, IU East: “Reclaiming Children’s Voices: British Children’s Nineteenth-Century Diaries”
  • Melissa Dinverno, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Rewriting Lorca: Modernism, Publication, Folklore and (Trans)nationalisms in 1920-1930s Spain”
  • David Dzubay, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “New Work for Berlin Piano Percussion”
  • Amit Hagar, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Thou Shalt Not Commute: A Finitist Outlook on Probability in Statistical Physics”
  • Chu He, English, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “Narrating Trauma in Jennifer Johnston’s ‘O Ananias, Azarias, and Miseal’ and Mary Beckett’s ‘A Belfast Woman’”
  • Elizabeth Lloyd, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Regional Climate Models, ‘Value Added,’ and ‘Model Robustness’”
  • Micheline Nilsen, history, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920-1975”
  • Kathleen O’Connell, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Illustration Master Class 2014 at Amherst College”
  • Margaret Ryznar, McKinney School of Law, IUPUI: “The Ethics and Philosophy of Child Support as a Human Right”
  • Marietta Simpson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Mosaic Melodies of the Diaspora”
  • Estella Vieira, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Female Figures in Fernando Pessoa”

Sarah Banks to discuss ethical challenges in research partnerships

sarah banks
Thursday, April 24th, 2014
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Education/Social Work (ES) Building, Room 2126, Global Crossroads Classroom

Dr. Sarah Banks, Durham University, UK, will deliver a lecture entitled “Tackling Ethical Challenges in Community-based Participatory Research.”

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) often involves community organizations and universities working together. The work of CBPR can help build community capacity in a time of austerity, generate new perspectives on social and economic issues and result in better implementation of research findings. CBPR is growing in popularity yet, both practically and ethically challenging are present in the work of CBPR.

In the work of CBPR, it is not always clear:

  • When people are in the role of researchers and/or research subjects;
  • When people’s work should be credited and when anonymity is important;
  • Who owns and has rights to the data/findings;
  • How to navigate the institutional ethical review process;
  • How to guard against exploitation of one party by another;
  • How to be open about unequal power relationships; and
  • How to achieve greater equality and mutual respect.

During the session, Dr. Sarah Banks will discuss the types of ethical issues that arise in CBPR, the practical challenges that community organizations and universities confront when they collaborate on research projects, and useful strategies for tackling these issues in practice. Reference will be made to Community-based Participatory Research: A Guide to Ethical Principles and Practice (2012) and accompanying case materials, films, podcasts, and exercises for promoting ethical awareness, reflection and action. More information about CBPR can be found on the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement website (UK).

Register for this event here.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning, IUPUI Department of Anthropology, IUPUI Solution Center, IUPUI Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP), IUPUI Office of External Affairs.

2015 NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship

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Applications due 15 November 2014

The North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), in collaboration with the Huntington Library, offers annually the NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship to aid in dissertation research in British Studies using the collections of the library. The amount of the fellowship is $3000. A requirement for holding the fellowship is that the time of tenure be spent in residence at the Huntington Library. The time of residence varies but may be as brief as one month. Applicants must be U. S. or Canadian citizens or permanent residents and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in a U.S. or Canadian institution.

Nominations and applications for the 2015 award are invited. Please note that the applications are due on November 15, 2014. Applications should consist of a curriculum vitae, two supporting letters (one from the applicant’s dissertation advisor), and a description of the dissertation research project. The letter should include a description of the materials to be consulted at the Huntington and the reason that these are essential sources for the dissertation.

A copy of the application package should be sent to each member of the Huntington Library Fellowship Committee. Letters should be placed in sealed envelopes, signed across the flap and given to the applicant for inclusion in the application package. Applications must be postmarked by November 15, 2014. Awards will be announced by January 30, 2015. For full guidelines, visit the fellowship website.

Applicants for the NACBS fellowship are also welcome to apply to supplement that award with a short-term award from the Huntington Library itself under the terms of its own fellowship competition, the closing date for which is also November 15, 2014.

Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop

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Thursday March 13, 2014
1:00 – 1:30 p.m.
UL 2120

The IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, Faculty Appointments and Advancement, invites you to attend the Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop.

Academics must provide evidence to demonstrate the impact and outcomes of their scholarly work. This hands-on workshop, facilitated by reference librarians, will help faculty explore various forms of documentary evidence to support their case for excellence. In addition, strategies for finding appropriate evidence and examples of effective documentation will be provided. If you haven’t already done so, you can register for this workshop by visiting the Academic Affairs webiste. Attendance is limited.

Prior to the workshop, attendees must set up Google Scholar and Researcher ID profiles. Links to each of these sites follow: Google Scholar, Researcher ID, and instructions for Google Scholar are attached for your reference.

We look forward to your interest and participation.

School of Informatics and Computing hosts robotics competition

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The IU School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will host the 2014 Indiana VEX IQ Robotics State Championship on Feb. 22 at the Informatics and Communications Technology Complex on the IUPUI campus.

The championship, presented by the Office of Education Innovation and Robotics Education & Competition Foundation, is a competition to spur science, technology, engineering and math activities at area middle schools, with some competitors coming from elementary schools.

“Today, informatics plays a key role in many different industries,” said Polly Baker, professor of media arts and science in the Department of Human-Centered Computing. “Robotics is an example of a field where students can engage by making and designing information technology to serve people and augment our abilities to operate in the world.”

“It’s amazing to see how many students are already interested in getting involved in this exciting area of study,” said Davide Bolchini, interim chair of the Department of Human-Centered Computing and professor of human-computer interaction at the School of Informatics and Computing.

The competition is divided into different parts. The day will include team cooperative and skill competitions, as well as evaluation of design books, and mathematical research components.

Seven of the competing teams will qualify for the VEX IQ World Championship on April 17 in Anaheim, Calif. About 30 teams are expected to compete in the event at IUPUI.

Newberry Library fellowships in the humanities, 2014-15

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The Newberry Library’s fellowships support humanities research in residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago. The Library offers intriguing and often rare materials; an interdisciplinary research community; individual consultations with staff curators, librarians, and scholars; and an array of scholarly programs. All applicants should examine the Newberry’s online catalog before applying. More information is available on the Newberry’s fellowship website.

Short-Term Fellowships are available to eligible PhD candidates, post-doctoral scholars, and holders of other terminal degrees who live and work outside of the Chicago area. The purpose is to help researchers gain access to specific materials at the Newberry that are not readily available to them elsewhere. Short-term fellowship applications are also invited from teams of two or three scholars to collaborate on a single, substantive project. Each scholar on a team-fellowship is awarded a full stipend. Terms are usually one month with a stipend of $2,500. Interested applicants should consult the eligibility information and full application guidelines.

United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship

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Applications are invited for the twenty-eighth year of the United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship. This fellowship is designed to support research and publication on the history, art, and architecture of the United States Capitol and related buildings. Graduate students and scholars may apply for periods ranging from one to twelve months; the stipend is $2500.00 per month. (Most awards are for one to four months.)

Applications must be postmarked, e-mailed, or faxed by March 15, 2014, for fellowships beginning in September 2014 and ending in August 2015. Applications should be mailed to Dr. Donald Kennon, U.S. Capitol Historical Society, 200 Maryland Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002; faxed to the Architect of the Capitol at (202)-228-4602; or e-mailed in PDF format to bwolanin@aoc.gov and dkennon@uschs.org.

Further details can be found at USCHS website. If you have questions about a potential topic, contact Dr. Barbara Wolanin at (202)-228-2700 or bwolanin@aoc.gov.

Newberry Library Long-Term Fellowships 2014-2015

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Deadline: December 1, 2013

The Newberry’s fellowships support humanities research in residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago. Its collection is wide-ranging, rich, and sometimes eccentric. Some of the resources offered at the Newberry are a lively interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and scholars; and an array of scholarly and public programs. All applicants are strongly encouraged to examine the Newberry’s online catalog before applying.

For more information, visit the Fellowship website.

These fellowships support research and writing by post-doctoral scholars. The purpose is to support fellows as they develop or complete larger-scale studies which draw on our collections, and also to nourish intellectual exchange among fellows and the Library community. Fellowship terms range from four to twelve months with stipends of up to $50,400.

Symposium continues exchange between schools of education at IUPUI and Moi University

photo Moi IUPUI

The latest in a continuing exchange of ideas and best practices between the Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI and the Moi University School of Education in Eldoret, Kenya, takes place next week in Indianapolis.

Faculty from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Moi will hold the second annual Faculty Symposium on Research and Teaching on Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 29 and 30, at the Lilly Auditorium on the lower level of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

The purpose is to bring together faculty from the two schools of education to share their research, teaching interests and scholarship, related to this year’s theme “Interrogating Educational Policy and Practice in Kenya and the U.S.” Through face-to-face presentations and discussions, Moi and IUPUI faculty will hear from each other and explore opportunities for joint scholarship and initiatives.

The first symposium took place in Kenya in August 2012. Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI, led a group of four faculty who traveled to Eldoret, which is almost 200 miles northwest of Nairobi. Seven faculty from Moi will travel to Indianapolis.

“We are committed to a mutually beneficial partnership that enhances faculty collaboration and student exchanges,” Rogan said. “The symposium will advance our internationalization efforts while strengthening relationships between Moi and IUPUI faculty.”

The symposium is an extension of IU and Moi University’s long-standing relationship, which began with the IU School of Medicine and Moi teaming up on the AMPATH Center, or Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a clinic that helps treat Kenyans with HIV and AIDS. In addition, the IU and Moi schools of journalism recently agreed to continue their partnership, and Kenya is now home to the IU Alumni Association Kenya Chapter.

The IU School of Education at IUPUI signed a memorandum of understanding with Moi University to formally partner for continuing professional exchanges. Last year’s symposium in Kenya allowed faculty from both universities to share best practices and research on a variety of topics. The Moi faculty presented on the teacher preparation practices at Moi, how the Moi faculty uses research to inform policy and practice in higher education, and science curriculum. Faculty from IUPUI spoke about teaching techniques with the latest technology, issues surrounding the education of urban youth, and women in education.

“This year’s symposium will offer a wide range of leading edge topics among the seven Moi and seven (IUPUI) School of Education presenters,” Rogan said. “It promises to be a highly informative and exciting event.”

The sessions are free and open to the public. Organizers request attendees pre-register online.