New Signature Center Initiative Category Announced

The Signature Centers Initiative (SCI) was begun in 2006 in an effort to create strong research units that are uniquely identifiable with IUPUI. The centers were created as an integral part of the Academic Plan for IUPUI, with the goal that they will lead the way in world-class research and creative activities that will substantially enhance IUPUI’s reputation. With these aims in mind, a call for proposals in the Fall of 2006 resulted in a total of 19 center proposals selected for support.  As there was a great deal of interest and enthusiasm for the Signature Centers Initiative, and as the quality of the proposals submitted was very high, in 2007 it was decided to continue the development of Signature Centers across the IUPUI campus. This has resulted in subsequent rounds of calls for proposals.

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research will introduce a new Signature Centers Initiative (SCI) funding category in 2015. This new category is for SCI planning grants that will allow collaborative research groups to build capacity and strengthen a future application for a center grant. The funding level for each approved proposal in this category is expected not to exceed $50,000 for one year.

Note: Proposals for this category require that the applicant has attended the annual SCI workshop, which will take place on January 16, 2015, from 1-3 pm in University Library Room 1126.

For more detailed information on SCI planning grants, please download the SCI guidelines.

IUPUI to host Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase

The IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Indiana University Research and Technology Corp. will host the 2014 IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase: Funding Innovation on Thursday, Nov. 20.

The event will take place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus Center Theater, on the lower level of the center, 420 University Blvd.

The forum will bring together researchers, entrepreneurs, investors and executives from IUPUI and the Indianapolis business community to explore the challenges and opportunities of translating the fruits of academic research into products.

Joseph Trebley, the head of startup support and promotion at the IURTC, will moderate a panel discussion on “Alternatives for Funding New Ventures.” More funding options are available for startup businesses now than ever before. New services have emerged to fill the gap created as banks and conventional venture capital firms have pulled away from riskier early-stage investments.

Panelists are Nick Carter, Kevin Hitchen, Polina Osherov and Jacob Schpok.

Nick Carter, founder of Husk Foods – Carter is a serial entrepreneur – founder of over half a dozen businesses – and is the acting CEO of two startups and an active partner or board member in four other established companies. Born a farm boy, he has a firm understanding of hard work, starting his first business at 16. Carter is the author of “Twelve Seconds,” which teaches entrepreneurs to get their small business off the ground.

Kevin Hitchen, founder of Localstake – Hitchen and his two partners co-founded Localstake to provide growing businesses a new solution for raising capital. Since its launch in 2013, the online investment marketplace for investing in private businesses has been featured in national publications such as TechCrunch, Yahoo Finance and Investopedia. Entrepreneur highlighted Localstake in its Reinvention 2013 article on “Indy’s Innovators.”

Polina Osherov, co-founder of Pattern – Osherov is co-founder of the nonprofit fashion industry networking and advocacy group Pattern and the editor-in-chief of Pattern Magazine, an award-winning, internationally distributed publication about fashion, design and creativity in Central Indiana. She is also a commercial photographer, working with corporate clients, advertising agencies and marketing companies.

Jacob Schpok, executive director for the lieutenant governor’s Office of Small Business and Enterprise – The newly created office was established to ensure Indiana works for entrepreneurs. Under his new role as executive director, Schpok continues to serve as state director of the Indiana Small Business Development Center, which last year helped Indiana businesses raise $70 million in capital and create over 1,600 full-time jobs.

The forum and showcase event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

School of Liberal Arts Summer 2015 Research, Creative Activity , and Scholarship Grants Call for Proposals

imagesPurpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grant is intended to support primary research, creative activity, and scholarship. Teaching and service activities are not funded through this program.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to award 4-5 grants. The typical award amount is no more than $6,300 for salary and fringe, although proposals for smaller amounts are also welcome. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. This does not preclude teaching one class in the summer, though consultation with your department chair or program director is strongly recommended. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and material collection or analysis. Special consideration will be given to career development and funding needs for research. Funds may be used as matches or in combination with other research grants. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $5,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 25.31%, for total salary and fringe of $6,265.50. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is estimated to be 26.06%, for total salary and fringe of $6,303. The actual award amount for July summer salary will be adjusted when 2015-2016 fringe benefit rates are announced in Spring 2015.

Eligibility:

Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI who did not receive a SLA Summer Research grant last year. IUPUC faculty are not eligible

Deadline: November 24 (SLA Internal Deadline November 17), 5 p.m.

SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

Call for Nominations: Max Planck Research Award

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Excellent scientists and scholars of all nationalities who are expected to continue producing outstanding academic achievements in international collaboration – not least with the assistance of this award – are eligible to be nominated for the Max Planck Research Award.

On an annually-alternating basis, the call for nominations addresses areas within the natural and engineering sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences and humanities.

The Max Planck Research Award 2015 will be conferred in the area of humanities and social sciences in the subject

Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism
.
The multidisciplinary field “Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism” addresses a range of diverse fundamental, partly interconnected research questions with reference to the development and change of religious thought and practice on their way to modernity and up to the present time. Is the conventional equation between modernity and secularisation a valid one? To what extent is the system of values, which shapes modern culture and society, rooted in the Christian tradition of the Middle Ages or in that of the early modern period (individualism, human rights, the intrinsic value of a secular order in contrast to a spiritual one)? Other questions playing a role within this debate address the adaptability of different religious and confessional communities to the challenges of modernity, as well as the relationship between state/secular authority and church(es) or other religious communities in the recent past and particularly in our present time. Concepts which are important in this area are for example laicism (Laïcité) or “civil religion” or privileging large religious communities. Finally the rise of religious pluralism and the individualisation of religious experience are relevant phenomena for this topic.

Every year, the Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society grant two research awards to one researcher working abroad and one researcher working in Germany. These two awards will be bestowed independently.

The Presidents/Vice Chancellors of universities and the heads of research institutions in Germany are eligible to make nominations (c.f. list of eligible nominators). Direct applications are not accepted. As a rule, each award is endowed with 750,000 EUR and may be used over a period of three to a maximum of five years to fund research chosen by the award winner.

Sponsor deadline: 31 Jan 2015, Nominations

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Max Planck Research Award

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

  1. Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development);
  2. Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences;
  3. Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences.

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadlines: December 3, 2014 (SLA Internal Deadline November 26), 5 pm

Terms of Awards: Applicants can request up to $75,000 for one year. Budgets must be justified and consistent with the scope of the proposed project. Applicants must commit to submitting an external funding proposal within 18 months from the start of the award; failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding programs. Recipients of funding in 2014-15 will participate in an open Workshop in the spring of 2016 where awardees will present project results and detailed plans to secure external funding. Final reports are required at study completion detailing the project’s progress including proposals submitted and funding received. IUCRG support should be acknowledged in all related publications and reports. Award notices are expected to go out no later than February 21 with funds available March 15, 2015.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

Guidelines

International Development Fund (IDF) Applications Now Available

imagesThe IDF grant was developed to enhance the international research and scholarly activity focus of the IUPUI academic mission. Generally, the IDF grant serves as venture capital to stimulate additional funding for international research and scholarly activity, which have strong potential to generate indirect cost recovery from extramural sources.

 

Deadline: November 15 (SLA Internal Deadline November 8) 5 p.m.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Eligibility is limited to principal investigators with full-time faculty appointments within a unit located on the Indianapolis campus.
  • Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

FUNDING AND PROJECT DURATION

  • Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.
  • Faculty salaries will not be funded through this mechanism.
  • Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism.
  • An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one proposal in a given round, and may apply for only one category.
  • Applications must show strong promise of funding support from outside sources, contributing to the recovery of indirect costs.
  • A letter of support from the applicant’s Chair is required.

CATEGORIES

  • International Research and Scholarly Activity Program Initiation: up to $15,000 to support international research and scholarly activity program initiation efforts, not maintenance of existing international programs. New initiations as well as existing partnerships adding new components will be considered.
  • Small International Research and Scholarly Activity Travel Grant: up to $3,000 for travel necessary to initiate new partnerships activities. Preference given for travel to key international partner institutions.
  • Supplement for Residence at Key Partner Institutions in Support of Research and Scholarly Activity: up to $5,000 generally in the form of a sabbatical or grant supplement to encourage and oversee partnership activities, visits, exchanges, while in residence.
  • School or Department Internationalization: up to $5,000 to a department or school to spend a year developing a comprehensive internationalization plan supporting research and scholarly activity, in collaboration with the Office of International Affairs and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.
  • Innovative Use of Technology for Internationalization: up to $5,000 to faculty for making use of interactive video or various web platforms to advance the internationalization of research or the classroom.

Guidelines and Application

Final Report Form

Important Note: Guidelines for most of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research internal grant programs have changed. The new guidelines must be used for all applications starting this fall including resubmissions.

(deadlines that fall on Saturday or Sunday will be due the following Monday)

 

Guest Post: Global Archaeologies and Cultural Landscapes in Northern Europe by Professor Paul Mullins

In the foreground, the Keminmaa Old St. Michael’s Church was built between 1519-21. Besides being a fascinating medieval building, it holds one of the most interesting spectacles in northern Finland: when Lutheran priest Nikolaus Rungius died in 1629 he was buried under the church and is on display in the church floor today. The church in the background, the new Saint Michael’s, was built in 1827.

In the foreground, the Keminmaa Old St. Michael’s Church was built between 1519-21. Besides being a fascinating medieval building, it holds one of the most interesting spectacles in northern Finland: when Lutheran priest Nikolaus Rungius died in 1629 he was buried under the church and is on display in the church floor today. The church in the background, the new Saint Michael’s, was built in 1827.

I knew absolutely nothing about Finland in November, 2010: I had the general impression that Finland was a snow-covered tundra peopled by reindeer and cross-country skiers. That changed at a conference in Scotland where I met some historical archaeologists from northern Finland, and their research on material life on the northernmost colonial reaches of Europe itself was fascinating and ambitious. I was keen to develop an international dimension to my research on the emergence of consumer culture, and Finland was a compelling if unexpected comparison to Indianapolis: my Finnish colleagues at the University of Oulu championed an historical archaeology of Finland that encompassed medieval trading centers, a rich history as Swedish and then Russian territories, and a 20th century heritage that witnessed independence, a civil war, and a distinctive if not unique World War II experience.

In 2011 I submitted an IUPUI Arts and Humanities Initiative Travel and Resource Support Grant to explore the material evidence of emergent capitalism in Finland over three centuries. Oulu is one of the world’s northernmost urban centers, a subarctic community settled by the Swedes in 1605 but part of a region in which people have lived for millennia. The grant proposal simply aspired to meet with my Finnish colleagues, inspect their excavated collections, share my own research, and perhaps craft a collaborative project in a discipline that is overwhelmingly focused on North America. The grant had a sound research agenda, but it also left some room to listen to my Finnish colleagues tell me what is important about their scholarship and heritage, and it allowed me to listen to my own curiosity.

The heart of my visit to Oulu was simply seeing the place, visiting the archaeological sites, and looking at the rich material culture the Finns had excavated from regional sites. One of the sites they had excavated was a merchant’s home in Oulu that burnt in a town-wide 1822 blaze. The merchant’s household contained an astoundingly massive assemblage of English ceramics that had been intended for trade in Oulu and into Arctic Lapland and east to Russia. During my Arts and Humanities grant visit we did some material analysis and started a paper on the assemblage that examined marketing and consumption on the margins of Europe. The paper compared the Finnish assemblage to marketplace patterns in the Atlantic World, which were in some ways very similar and in others quite different. That paper, “The Creamware Revolution on the Northern European Periphery: Creamware Marketing in 19th Century Northern Finland,” has since been published in 2013 in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology.

What may have been most important about the Finland trip were the projects that have followed despite not being part of the original research design: We subsequently have published a series of papers on colonial landscape surveillance, World War II landscapes, and medieval marketing, all of which would never have been research questions for me if I had not ventured beyond Indianapolis. The Arts and Humanities project provided sufficient preliminary research to support a Fulbright Finland proposal, and I received a Fulbright Scholar and returned to the University of Oulu in Fall 2012. I became a Docent in American Historical Archaeology at the University of Oulu in Fall 2013, an associate faculty appointment; my colleague Timo Ylimaunu is now an International Scholar at IUPUI.

It turns out that Finland is indeed covered by snow for much of the year and has lots of reindeer and skiers, but there were lots of intellectual and cultural surprises. Oulu, for instance, is home to the Air Guitar World Championships, whose astoundingly cheeky ambition is “to promote world peace – according to Air Guitar ideology, wars will end, climate change stops and all bad things disappear if all the people in the world play the Air Guitar”; at the edge of the Arctic Circle, Rovaniemi todays bills itself as the home of Santa Claus, with numerous Kris Kringles entertaining a host of tourists; and the legion of saunas covering the Finnish landscape are profoundly consequential cultural spaces and not simply sweaty showers. Much of what the grant aspired to do was successful, but some of the longer term research implications probably came from the experience of having good local colleagues and a bit of IUPUI support to start the project at all.

 

Paul R. Mullins is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at IUPUI; Past-President of the Society for Historical Archaeology; and author of The Archaeology of Consumer Culture and Race and Affluence: An Archaeology of African America. For more on his research see his blog Archaeology and Material Culture.

 

Guest Post: In Search of Annie Parker by Professor Jack McKivigan

UntitledThanks to support from the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the IU New Currents program, and several campus offices and departments as well as Indiana Humanities (the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities), the Frederick Douglass Papers will sponsor a gathering of scholars, teachers, students, and the general public to examine the historical and literary significance of Douglass’s novella, “The Heroic Slave” (1853), on our campus in October.

In preparation for this symposium several members of the Douglass Papers staff have been engaged in a small piece of literary detective work. Douglass’s “Heroic Slave” was originally published as a contribution to the short “gift book” entitled Autographs for Freedom, published in Boston by the firm of John P. Jewitt. Besides Douglass, this collection of essays, poems, and short fiction features many well-known mid-nineteenth century writers and political and reform leaders including Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Sumner, Horace Greeley, John G. Whittier, and Caroline Dall.

Among the diverse collection of black and white, male and female, American and British contributors to Autographs is the writer Annie Parker who published a poem “Story Telling” and the separate story, “Passages in the Life of a Slave Woman.” In the latter, the narrator, a slave woman, recounts the tragic outcome of a master/slave sexual relationship. In the past few decades this piece has been anthologized several times as one of the earliest works of fiction by an African American author. But who was Annie Parker? None of the anthologies or scholars writing about the story have ever been able to supply any biographical details about her.

Project assistant editor Jeffrey Duvall, graduate research assistant Rebecca Pattillo, and I have been at work trying to answer that question this summer. Frederick Douglass’s own Rochester-published newspaper contains a piece under Parker’s byline in the early 1850s and two other short journalistic pieces by her appear in a Geneva, New York-based temperance newspaper in that same era. Then the trail gets cold, very cold.

Genealogical sources turn up a few possible “Annie Parkers” in the upstate New York region but none of them has any known connection to the antislavery movement and all were white. Perhaps Annie Parker was not a runaway slave as others have speculated. This raises the possibility that “Annie Parker” was a pen name–but whose?

The most intriguing possibility is that Parker is none other than Harriet Jacobs, the author of the famous 1859 autobiography of her horrifyingly abusive career as a South Carolina slave. Jacobs had escaped slavery in the early 1840s and worked as a maid for the Massachusetts journalist Nathaniel Parker Willis, who is referred to twice obtusely in Parker’s own writings. In 1849-50, two years before the publication of the Autographs, Jacobs lived in Rochester and actually worked in the same building where Douglass edited his newspaper. While Jacobs had returned to working for Willis in Massachusetts by the time Autographs was compiled, those earlier connections might have led the gift book’s editor, Julia Griffiths, to have solicited a piece by Jacobs, although no evidence of such a solicitation has yet been found. The same year, Harriet Beecher Stowe also asked Jacobs to write a summary of her slave experiences to include in her Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a response to critics of her condemnation of slave mistreatment in her earlier novel. The Douglass staff is exploring whether Jacobs might have wanted to tell her personal story herself in a safer fictional form in the pages of Autographs.

The product of this research will just be a small part of the upcoming symposium, where Douglass papers staff will be joined by seven widely-published scholars from several disciplines to explore various contexts of “the Heroic Slave.” The event is free and open to the public and we hope will be well-attended by many persons from the central Indiana community interested in Frederick Douglass and his campaign against slavery.

by Jack Kaufman-McKivigan

Dr. Kaufman-McKivigan is Mary O’Brien Gibson Professor of History at IUPUI; Co-Director, annual Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Public Lecture and Workshop Series and Past-Director, annual Midwest Peace & Justice Summit (2005-2011); and Project Editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers Edition.

35th Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting hosted by IUPUI

Indianapolis Skyline

Indianapolis Skyline

Rights, Riots, and Reactions

The Indiana Association of Historians (IAH) invites papers and panel proposals for its annual meeting to be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis, Indiana on February 28, 2015.

In the year 2015 we focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo, the Battle of New Orleans, the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I, the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

While papers and panels from all fields and related to all topics of history are welcomed, the program committee is particularly interested in proposals that focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo, the Battle of New Orleans, the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I, the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Events leading up to these milestones and reaction to them are also encouraged as the basis of papers.

The committee also welcomes submissions in the fields of K-12 history education and public history. Academic, public, and independent historians, as well as graduate students, are eligible to present papers. All presenters must be present at the conference.

Conference papers (approximately 10 pages/2,500 words) may be based on original research, synthesis of scholarship, or participant experience. Sessions will consist of two or three papers with comments.

To submit a proposal for a paper and/or session,send a one-page proposal for each presentation and a one-page c.v. Panel proposals should include a one-page proposal, which specifies the topic each participant will discuss, and a one-page c.v. per participant. The deadline for submitting paper and/or session proposals is November 10, 2014. E-mail submissions are encouraged and will be accepted until the deadline.

Submit proposals to:
IAH Program 2015
c/o IAH president, Nancy Conner
1500 N. Delaware Street,Indianapolis,IN 46202
Email: nconner@indianahumanities.org

Brian Dirck, Professor of History, Anderson University, will provide the keynote address. His first book, Lincoln and Davis: Imagining America,1809-1865, offered a comparative analysis of the two Civil War presidents’ lives and careers. He has since focused most of his attention on Abraham Lincoln. His publications include Lincoln the Lawyer, an overview of Lincoln’s legal career that was awarded the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Abraham Lincoln in 2007. In 2012 he published Lincoln and the Constitution as part of the Concise Lincoln Library Series and Lincoln and White America, an analysis of Lincoln’s views concerning white supremacy and racism.

Founded in 1980, the IAH is the statewide organization of historians with a mission to furnish opportunities for persons within the state’s historical community to become acquainted, to share research and ideas, to promote and strengthen the historical profession, and to encourage the pursuit of history by the general public. IAH members include historians who live or work in Indiana and specialize in various fields of history, not just Indiana history. Visit their website for membership information.

APS Franklin Research Grants, including APS/British Academy Fellowship for Research in London and APS/Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities Fellowship for Research in Edinburgh

UntitledThe Franklin program offers up to $6,000 to scholars for one to two months research.  It is particularly designed to help meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses. In addition to the general grants, there are two specific programs for research in London or in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Deadlines

October 1, for a January 2015 decision for work in February 2015 through January 2016
December 1, for a March 2015 decision for work in April 2015 through January 2016

The Franklin grants are made to individuals, rather than to Indiana University on behalf of the scholar, so they will pay awardees directly. Even though it is not necessary to route proposals through the IU Office of Research Administration, please notify Associate Dean Jeff Wilson (jeswilso@iupui.edu) and Grants Analyst Edith Millikan (emillika@iupui.edu) if you intend to apply. For more information on the School of Liberal Arts procedure for fellowship applications, please visit our website.

For more information on the Franklin Grant click here