Dr. Kristina Horn Sheeler, Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture

Dr. Kristina Horn Sheeler

Dr. Kristina Horn Sheeler

The Office of Academic Affairs and the Faculty Club invite you to attend the Reading at the Table presentation scheduled for Wednesday, November 12, 2014, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., when Dr. Kristina Horn Sheeler discusses her book Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, winner of the James A. Winans and Herbert A. Wichelns Memorial Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Rhetoric and Public Address from the National Communication Association as well as the 2014 Outstanding Book Award from the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender.

In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson provide a discussion of US presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody.

Her reading will look at what elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Pundits have been predicting women’s political ascendency for years. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture.

Please register in advance for this event.

Reading at the Table: David J. Bodenhamer, “The Revolutionary Constitution”

Reading at the Table: The Revolutionary Constitution

David J. Bodenhamer
Professor of History
Director, The Polis Center
IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

September 13, 2012, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, University Place Faculty Club

The annual Reading at the Table series provides a forum to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty. During each luncheon, the featured author will read from his/her work and open the floor to discussion. Buffet lunch is available for $11.80.

Register at: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

 

David J. Bodenhamer is Founder and Executive Director at The Polis Center, Professor of History, and Adjunct Professor of Informatics at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. He is the author or editor of several books on American legal and constitutional history, including Fair Trial: Rights of the Accused in American History, and is co-editor of the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing.

In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America’s basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security.

Bodenhamer Reading at the Table