The Future of the Arts and Humanities Roundtable: Keira Amstutz, William Blomquist, John Dichtl, Valerie Eickmeier, Jonathan Elmer, David Lawrence

Indiana Humanities LogoMarch 5, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Location: Indiana Humanities, 1500 N. Delaware
Free tickets available soon (boxed lunches available for purchase)

Are the arts and humanities in crisis? What do financial cuts ultimately mean for arts and humanities institutions and their publics? What role should governments play in supporting the arts and humanities? What does the future look like for arts and humanities in this country and around the world? What functions do the arts and humanities provide in sustaining a democratic society?

This roundtable will discuss these and many other questions in this can’t-miss event featuring several of central Indiana’s leaders in the arts and humanities.

Keira Amstutz is the President and CEO of Indiana Humanities.

Dr. William Blomquist is the Dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. John Dichtl is the Executive Director of the National Council on Public History and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in History in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Valerie Eickmeier is the Dean of the Herron School of Art and Design.

Dr. Jonathan Elmer is the Director of the College of Arts and Humanities Institute and a Professor of English at IU Bloomington.

David Lawrence is the President and CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

The Value and Values of Public Scholarship: Laura Holzman, Modupe Labode, Mary Price

Indiana Humanities LogoFebruary 24, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
Free tickets available below

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

The 21st-century research university is no ivory tower. It is a vibrant space that cultivates creativity and experiment — a space that encourages and supports multiple ways of knowing and doing. Public scholarship is an essential pillar of the 21st-century university, building bridges and partnerships between the institution and the many publics with which its members engage. This roundtable will engage with the following questions. What is public scholarship? What roles does it play in research, creative activity, and teaching? What misconceptions do people have about public scholarship? How should universities evaluate public scholarship in promotion and tenure? How does one become a public scholar?

Dr. Laura Holzman is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art in Art History in the Herron School of Art and Design and in Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Modupe Labode is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of African American History and Museums in History and Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Mary Price is the Faculty Development Director in the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and an Associate Faculty member in Anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

ArtPlace invites letters of inquiry for creative placemaking projects

ArtPlace, a nationwide initiative to drive community revitalization through the arts, is inviting Letters of Inquiry for its fourth round of funding through its Innovation Grants program.

A collaboration of thirteen major national and regional foundations, six of the nation’s largest banks, and eight federal agencies, ArtPlace works to accelerate creative placemaking — defined as “a means of investing in art and culture at the heart of a portfolio of integrated strategies that can drive vibrancy and diversity so powerful that it transforms communities” — in the United States.

Grants will be awarded to projects that involve arts organizations, artists, and designers working in partnership with local and national partners to have a transformative impact on community vibrancy. Applications are encouraged from all fifty states and any U.S. territory. Certain ArtPlace funders also are committed to working in specific states or communities. Currently, these include Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Miami, New York City, Philadelphia, San Jose, and St. Paul, as well as communities in Alaska, Arizona, California, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. Projects in these areas are particularly encouraged, although applications are welcome and grants may be awarded to projects from anywhere in the U.S.

Award amounts are decided on a case-by-case basis. To date, ArtPlace America has awarded 134 grants to 124 organizations in more than 79 communities across the U.S. for a total of $42.1 million.

While ArtPlace grants are intended to fund a range of costs associated with implementing a creative placemaking project, ArtPlace loans should be used to finance costs associated with a capital project such as pre-development, acquisition, construction, and real estate improvements.

Complete guidelines and Letter of Inquiry submission instructions are available at the ArtPlace Web site.