The Center for Digital Scholarship: Preserving the past and preparing for the future

UntitledThe online, digital environment is changing the way scholars communicate, access scholarly resources, and share the products of their research. In recent years, the University Library’s program of digital scholarship has grown so much that we were prompted to formalize our efforts by creating the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center for Digital Scholarship can help faculty, staff, and students navigate this fast-changing environment. The Center will enable faculty to share articles, data, images, learning objects, posters, presentations and working papers with students. In addition, it can be used as a means of engaging students in primary research and knowledge creation.

Much like the library itself, the Center will benefit community members as well as IUPUI faculty, staff and students. The Center functions as an important bridge through which we co-create collections with community organizations, providing access and preserving the stories of many of Central Indiana’s leading cultural institutions.

Engagement with the Indianapolis and Indiana community is one of the core principles of IUPUI, and a significant point in the current draft of the IUPUI Strategic Plan. While the library has been engaging with the community through digital collection creation for over 12 years (the majority of our historical digital collections are physically owned by other cultural heritage institutions, including libraries, historical societies, and community organizations), the Center offers an additional connection to our community partners.

We have the technology and expertise to digitize and provide access to historic collections that would otherwise be accessible only to those able to visit the cultural heritage institutions. We are making Indianapolis history visible to the world. We are also creating trusting relationships in the community that have proved fruitful for ventures outside of digitization.

The Center for Digital Scholarship represents the next chapter in the library’s enduring commitment to technology. We encourage you to take advantage of the Center and all of the resources it has to offer.

Previously unseen photos of 1989 Tiananmen Square movement are online as IUPUI digital collection

tiananmen squareINDIANAPOLIS — University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is making public more than 400 previously unseen black-and-white photographs of the historic student-led 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement. The library has digitized photographs taken by an IUPUI professor and added them to the library’s online digital collections.

It was April 15, 1989, when Hu Yaobang, the ousted general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, died in Beijing. Thousands of people went to Tiananmen Square to mourn his death. College students in Beijing universities soon turned the mourning into a grassroots movement that called for political reform, including an end to government corruption and a guarantee of freedom of speech. The movement ended abruptly with the killing of hundreds of protesting Chinese citizens during a military crackdown on June 4, 1989.

Thousands of media professionals, along with ordinary citizens, captured the events of the student-led movement on camera. Nevertheless, relatively few of these images survived since the Chinese government confiscated cameras and film in its crackdown on the movement and its leaders.

The photographs in the University Library digital collection, “Tiananmen Square, 1989,” are exhibited in memory of those who died during the movement. The collection can also serve as an educational tool for younger generations to learn about that period of history visually.

The photographer, Edgar Huang, a faculty member from the IU School of Informatics and Computing on the Indianapolis campus, was then a university instructor and a documentary photographer in Beijing. He traveled almost every day to different university campuses and different locations in Beijing, especially Tiananmen Square, to record with his Nikon F3 all the exciting, frustrating and sad moments.

After the government crackdown, some of Huang’s negatives were confiscated, but more than 90 percent of his 54 rolls of 36mm film were carefully hidden in different locations in Beijing to avoid possible raids.

“Many young people in China have no recollection of what happened in Beijing in the spring/summer of 1989,” Huang said. “These photographs will serve as a reminder of numerous ordinary Beijing citizens’ bravery and are exhibited in memory of those who died.

“Thanks to my beloved late wife, Lily Sun, who brought the negatives to the United States in 1994, these photographs are now possible to be exhibited to the public.”

Huang expressed appreciation for the work of IUPUI University Library staff, especially Kristi L. Palmer, Jennifer Ann Johnson and Ann Lys Proctor, in making the digitization of all the negatives and eventually this online exhibition possible.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway and IUPUI library bring racing history to life online

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has a rich history that has shaped the culture of Indiana as well as the worlds of sports and racing.
A new digital collection made possible by the collaboration of the motorsports organization and the University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis captures that history through more than 14,000 images.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection features highlights from the Speedway’s 100-plus years with photographs taken from 1879 to 1997. The photographs can be viewed online due to an ambitious digitization project, funded by grants from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services and administered by the Indiana State Library.

Some of the highlights include the very first public event at the Speedway, the 1909 U.S. National Balloon Championship. That helium-filled-balloon competition took place at the Speedway more than two months before the oval was completed. Other historic moments represented in the collection are the 1909 motorcycle race, dominated by “Cannon Ball” Baker, and the first Indianapolis 500 Mile Race in 1911.

This online collection will allow users from across the world to explore the storied past of the iconic Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Users can browse the collection by searching for drivers by name or searching for particular races by year.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection is one of more than 60 online collections created by the IUPUI University Library and its community partners. These unique online repositories, containing digital images of historic documents and objects, were created with the help of local organizations such as the Conner Prairie Interactive History Park, in nearby Fishers, and the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper.

Located at 755 W. Michigan Ave. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.