NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller institutions (internal deadline 02/20/2014)

L0025
NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller institutions

LimSub URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2050

IU Internal Deadline: 02/20/2014

NEH Application Deadline: 5/1/2014

Brief Description: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

 

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions – such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities – improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.

 

Preservation Assistance Grants may be used for purposes like these:

  • General preservation assessments
  • Consultations with professionals to address a specific preservation issue, need, or problem
  • Purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies
  • Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections
  • Education and training

 

Award Amount:

  • Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded.
  • All grants are awarded for a period of eighteen months, although a grantee may complete a project in a shorter period of time.
  • Cost sharing is not required in this program. If eligible expenses are more than $6,000, an applicant may cover the difference and show this as cost sharing in the project&39;s budget.

 

Eligibility: Applicants must demonstrate that they:

  • care for and have custody of the humanities collections that are the focus of the application;
  • have at least one staff member or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid; and
  • make their collections open and available for the purpose of education, research, and/or public programming, as evidenced by the number of days on which the institution is open to the public, the capacity to support access and use, and the availability of staff for this purpose.

 

Individuals are not eligible to apply.

 

Limitation: One per campus

Only one application for a Preservation Assistance Grant may be submitted annually by an institution, although distinct collecting entities of a larger organization may apply in the same year, such as the library and museum of a university or two historic sites within a historical society.

 

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by February 20, 2014 for internal competition.

 

1.       Provide a one-paragraph abstract (up to one thousand characters) describing the nature of the collections that are the focus of the project, their significance to the humanities, and the specific goal(s) and activities that the grant would support.

2.       1-3 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) that:

  • State the specific activity or activities that the grant would support and the goals of the proposed project.
  • Describe the collections that are the focus of the project, emphasizing their significance to the humanities.
  • Discuss how this project fits into the institution’s overall preservation needs or plans. Describe the current condition of collections and the environment in which they are stored. Explain how the proposed activities build on previous preservation efforts and how the project fits into future preservation plans. In addition, explain how the project would increase your institution’s ability to improve collection care beyond the period of the grant.
  • Outline the steps of the project, the sequence in which they will occur, and indicate who is responsible for which activities.

3.       A Letter from the Chair or Dean

4.       2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

NEH Challenge Grants (internal deadline 2/5/2014)

L0130a
NEH Challenge Grants

LimSub URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2049

IU Internal Deadline: 02/05/2014

Optional Letter of Intent: 3/20/2014

NEH Application Deadline: 5/1/2014

Brief Description: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

NEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge.

 

Award Amount:

NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $30,000 to $1 million, the maximum amount that may be requested. Requests over $500,000, however, are unlikely to be funded at the requested level, and in recent years the maximum grant has ranged between $425,000 and $500,000. Applicants wishing to apply for a grant of more than $500,000 should consult with NEH staff about the size of their requests. Smaller grants for sharply defined purposes are encouraged.

 

Fund-raising:

NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered.

 

Eligibility:

With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.

 

Limitation: One per campus  

Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.

 

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by February 5, 2014 for internal competition.

1.       1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.

2.       A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3.       2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

 

NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

NEH Fellowships (deadline May 1, 2013)

Fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources in the humanities. Projects may be at any stage of development. CFDA 45.160

The Fellowships program accepts applications from researchers, teachers, and writers, whether they have an institutional affiliation or not. All U.S. citizens, whether they reside inside or outside the United States, are eligible to apply. Foreign nationals who have been living in the United States or its jurisdictions for at least the three years prior to the application deadline are also eligible. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply. Applicants who have satisfied all the requirements for a degree and are awaiting its conferral are eligible for NEH Fellowships; but such applicants need a letter from the dean of the conferring school or their department chair attesting to the applicant’s status as of May 1, 2013. NEH encourages submission of Fellowships applications from faculty at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Fellowships cover periods lasting from six to twelve months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month period. The fellowships do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs. Recipients may begin their awards as early as January 1, 2014, and as late as September 1, 2015. The award period must be full-time and continuous. Teaching and administrative assignments or other major activities may not be undertaken during the fellowship period.

http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships

NEH Preservation and Access research and Development Grants

NEH Division of Preservation and Access

Receipt Deadline May 1, 2013 for Projects Beginning January 2014

Preservation and Access Research and Development grants support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of searching, discovering, and using such materials.

Applicants should define a specific problem, devise procedures and potential solutions, and explain how they would evaluate their projects and disseminate their findings. Project results must serve the needs of a significant number of humanists.

For details: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-and-access-research-and-development

 

NEH Grant: Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics, Deadline June 12

Brief Summary

The Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program supports documentary films that examine international and transnational themes in the humanities. These projects are meant to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world by exploring one or more countries and cultures outside of the United States. Proposed documentaries must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship.

The Division of Public Programs encourages the exploration of innovative nonfiction storytelling that presents multiple points of view in creative formats. The proposed film should range in length from a standard broadcast length of thirty minutes to a feature-length documentary.

We invite a wide range of approaches to international and transnational topics and themes, such as an examination of a critical issue in ethics, religion, or history, viewed through an international lens; an exploration of a topic that transcends a single nation-state, with the topic being explored across borders; or an exploration of the history and culture(s) of a specific region, country, or community outside of the United States.

http://www.neh.gov/grants/public/bridging-cultures-through-film-international-topics

NEH “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities” Symposium Scheduled for April 10-12

August 10, 2012 – The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced the first initiative of its partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, working in cooperation with NLM, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland, and Research Councils UK, will be a part of “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities,” an interdisciplinary symposium exploring the intersection of digital humanities and biomedicine.

Scheduled to take place April 10-12, 2013, Shared Horizons will provide a unique forum for  participants and their institutions to address questions about collaboration, research methodologies, and the interpretation of evidence arising from the interdisciplinary opportunities in this area of biomedical-driven humanities scholarship.

Shared Horizons aims to create opportunities for disciplinary cross-fertilization through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with breakout sessions, all designed to promote a rich exchange of ideas about how large-scale quantitative methods can lead to new understandings of human culture. Bringing together researchers from the digital humanities and bioinformatics communities, the symposium will explore ways in which these two communities might collaborate on projects that bridge the humanities and medicine around the topics of sequence alignment and network analysis, two modes of analysis that intersect with “big data.”

Additional information is available on the Shared Horizons website.