NEH summer stipends – limited submission

IU Internal Deadline: 6/16/2014

NEH Proposal Deadline: 9/30/2014

Limited Submission website.

Brief Description:

From NEH website: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH’s Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans’ understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest. In connection with a focus on civic discourse, projects might explore the role of women in America’s civic life as well as the civic role of women in other cultures and regions of the world.

Award Amount:

Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:

· Only individual applicants are eligible to apply for Summer Stipends.

· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.

· Individuals who have held or been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. See Program details.

· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.

· See Program details for more specific information.

Limitation:

INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACULTY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS

Only two faculty members teaching full-time at colleges and universities may be nominated by their institutions (campus) to apply for a Summer Stipend.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:

· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;

· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure

· emeritus faculty; and

· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

IUPUI: For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by June 16, 2014 for internal competition.

1. Provide a 1-2 page summary that includes the following: (limitation does not include references)

· Project Title

· Project Director Name and Credentials

· Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.

· Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.

· Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:

· Current and Past Positions

· Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations

· Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.

· Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations

· Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

Call for applications: Newberry/NEH seminar, “Bridging National Borders in North America”

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University Faculty
Monday, June 2, 2014 to Friday, June 27, 2014
Deadline to apply: March 4, 2014

The Newberry Library’s Dr. William Scholl Center for American History and Culture will host a four-week summer 2014 NEH seminar for college and university faculty that will explore the history of North America’s border and borderlands, providing participants with a stipend of $3,300.

In keeping with the recent work in the field and the collection strengths of the Newberry Library, this seminar will take a broad geographic approach, framing borderlands as distinct places at particular moments in time where no single people or sovereignty imposed its will. The organizing theme is the process of border-making.

The seminar will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent’s map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality.

Two questions will guide examinations of these developments: how did diverse peoples challenge national borders, or use or alter them for their own purposes? And, how does consideration of these topics recast our understanding of the national and intertwined histories of Mexico, the United States, and Canada?

Please visit the Newberry website for more information and how to apply. Contact Benjamin Johnson or the Scholl Center (scholl@newberry.org) for more information.

Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys book discussion series at Ivy Tech

The community is invited to join a book club hosted by Ivy Tech and co-sponsored by IUPUI and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation. Everyone is welcome. The topic is “Connected Histories,” one of the five themes of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Muslim Journeys Bookshelf.

Learn more about the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world through a special program at the Julia M. Carson Learning Resource Center (LRC) titled Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys, a reading and discussion series. The LRC is proud to present the series with the help of grants from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In this series, attendees are welcome to read one or more of the following featured books and then attend the discussions which take place at the LRC (2725 N. Illinois Street, Indianapolis). The LRC has extra copies of each book available for checkout. Each book discussion will take place from 4:00pm – 5:30 p.m. on the following dates:

  • DECEMBER 4: When Asia Was the World: Traveling Merchants, Scholars, Warriors, and Monks Who Created the “Riches of the East” by Stewart Gordon
  • JANUARY 15: The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance by Jim Al-Khalili
  • FEBRUARY 12: The Ornament of the World by Maria Rosa Menocal
  • MARCH 19: Leo Africanus by Amin Maalouf, translated by Peter Sluglett
  • APRIL 9: Islamic Art film screening and art exhibit. This event is co-sponsored by IUPUI and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation and will be held at the Indiana Interchurch Center (1100 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis).

Extra copies of the books are available through the Ivy Tech library. For more on the books themselves and the theme of connected histories, please see the following website. To pre-register for one or more of the above events, please visit the event website.

 

IUPUI University Library joins with community partners to share perspectives on Muslim culture

Tuesday, November 12, 2013
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI University Library

Faculty, students and community members are invited to “Muslim Journeys, Human Journeys,” an exploration of the people, places, histories, beliefs and cultures of Muslims in the U.S. and beyond. IU School of Liberal Arts professor Edward Curtis will speak about key themes from a series of books highlighted by a current program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The NEH’s “Muslim Journeys” program engages the power of the humanities to promote understanding of and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures and perspectives within the United States and abroad. Through the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, NEH and the American Library Association are providing a collection of 25 books, three documentary films, a one-year subscription to Oxford Islamic Studies Online, and a DVD of short films titled “Islamic Art Spots” to a variety of libraries across the country, including University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Curtis is Millennium Chair of the School of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at IUPUI. He is the author or editor of several books, including Muslims in America: A short history, which was named one of the best 100 books of 2009 by Publishers Weekly. A former NEH Fellow at the National Humanities Center, Curtis has been awarded Carnegie, Fulbright and Mellon fellowships. He is also a founding co-editor of the Journal of Africana Religions.

The Ivy Tech Community College library and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation are co-sponsoring this event with the IUPUI University Library. Parking will be provided for community guests in the North Street garage at the corner of Michigan and Blake streets.

Huntington Library Research Fellowships 2014-15

Fellowships at The Huntington 2014-2015

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present and include seven million manuscripts, 413,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Within the general fields listed above there are many areas of special strength, including: Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

The Huntington will award to scholars over 150 fellowships for the academic year 2014-2015. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life.

Application deadline for all fellowships: Nov. 15, 2013.

Huntington Fellowships

Short-Term Awards
Long-Term Awards
Dibner History of Science Program

 

For full fellowship and grant program details and deadlines, including application procedure and submission guidelines, visit The Huntington’s website.

Short-Term Awards
Huntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

  • Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
  • Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
  • Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
  • Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
  • Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
  • Molina Fellowships in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.

The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Linacre College, Oxford

Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall

Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Travel Grants

Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2014, and no later than June 30, 2015.

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship

Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.

Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).

Amount of award: $5,500.

Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Dr. Gerald Cloud at gwcloud@humnet.ucla.edu.

Long-Term Awards
Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships

Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections and must have received their PhD between 2009 and 2011.

Mellon Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dibner Program in the History of Science

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library and to work in the other resources for the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

Short-Term Awards

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

Long-Term Awards

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants can be conducting research or already be at the writing stage and need reference materials only.

How to Apply for Funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities

How to Apply for Funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities

Wednesday, September 18, 2013
2:00pm – 3:00pm
University Library, Room 1116

Please be sure to register for this webinar, which shows faculty and administrators how to apply for funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Register here: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/NEHWebinar/

 

NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller institutions (internal deadline 02/20/2014)

L0025
NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller institutions

LimSub URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2050

IU Internal Deadline: 02/20/2014

NEH Application Deadline: 5/1/2014

Brief Description: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

 

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions – such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities – improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.

 

Preservation Assistance Grants may be used for purposes like these:

  • General preservation assessments
  • Consultations with professionals to address a specific preservation issue, need, or problem
  • Purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies
  • Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections
  • Education and training

 

Award Amount:

  • Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded.
  • All grants are awarded for a period of eighteen months, although a grantee may complete a project in a shorter period of time.
  • Cost sharing is not required in this program. If eligible expenses are more than $6,000, an applicant may cover the difference and show this as cost sharing in the project&39;s budget.

 

Eligibility: Applicants must demonstrate that they:

  • care for and have custody of the humanities collections that are the focus of the application;
  • have at least one staff member or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid; and
  • make their collections open and available for the purpose of education, research, and/or public programming, as evidenced by the number of days on which the institution is open to the public, the capacity to support access and use, and the availability of staff for this purpose.

 

Individuals are not eligible to apply.

 

Limitation: One per campus

Only one application for a Preservation Assistance Grant may be submitted annually by an institution, although distinct collecting entities of a larger organization may apply in the same year, such as the library and museum of a university or two historic sites within a historical society.

 

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by February 20, 2014 for internal competition.

 

1.       Provide a one-paragraph abstract (up to one thousand characters) describing the nature of the collections that are the focus of the project, their significance to the humanities, and the specific goal(s) and activities that the grant would support.

2.       1-3 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) that:

  • State the specific activity or activities that the grant would support and the goals of the proposed project.
  • Describe the collections that are the focus of the project, emphasizing their significance to the humanities.
  • Discuss how this project fits into the institution’s overall preservation needs or plans. Describe the current condition of collections and the environment in which they are stored. Explain how the proposed activities build on previous preservation efforts and how the project fits into future preservation plans. In addition, explain how the project would increase your institution’s ability to improve collection care beyond the period of the grant.
  • Outline the steps of the project, the sequence in which they will occur, and indicate who is responsible for which activities.

3.       A Letter from the Chair or Dean

4.       2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

NEH Challenge Grants (internal deadline 2/5/2014)

L0130a
NEH Challenge Grants

LimSub URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2049

IU Internal Deadline: 02/05/2014

Optional Letter of Intent: 3/20/2014

NEH Application Deadline: 5/1/2014

Brief Description: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

NEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge.

 

Award Amount:

NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $30,000 to $1 million, the maximum amount that may be requested. Requests over $500,000, however, are unlikely to be funded at the requested level, and in recent years the maximum grant has ranged between $425,000 and $500,000. Applicants wishing to apply for a grant of more than $500,000 should consult with NEH staff about the size of their requests. Smaller grants for sharply defined purposes are encouraged.

 

Fund-raising:

NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered.

 

Eligibility:

With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.

 

Limitation: One per campus  

Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.

 

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by February 5, 2014 for internal competition.

1.       1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.

2.       A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3.       2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

 

NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

NEH Fellowships (deadline May 1, 2013)

Fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources in the humanities. Projects may be at any stage of development. CFDA 45.160

The Fellowships program accepts applications from researchers, teachers, and writers, whether they have an institutional affiliation or not. All U.S. citizens, whether they reside inside or outside the United States, are eligible to apply. Foreign nationals who have been living in the United States or its jurisdictions for at least the three years prior to the application deadline are also eligible. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply. Applicants who have satisfied all the requirements for a degree and are awaiting its conferral are eligible for NEH Fellowships; but such applicants need a letter from the dean of the conferring school or their department chair attesting to the applicant’s status as of May 1, 2013. NEH encourages submission of Fellowships applications from faculty at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Fellowships cover periods lasting from six to twelve months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month period. The fellowships do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs. Recipients may begin their awards as early as January 1, 2014, and as late as September 1, 2015. The award period must be full-time and continuous. Teaching and administrative assignments or other major activities may not be undertaken during the fellowship period.

http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships

NEH Preservation and Access research and Development Grants

NEH Division of Preservation and Access

Receipt Deadline May 1, 2013 for Projects Beginning January 2014

Preservation and Access Research and Development grants support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of searching, discovering, and using such materials.

Applicants should define a specific problem, devise procedures and potential solutions, and explain how they would evaluate their projects and disseminate their findings. Project results must serve the needs of a significant number of humanists.

For details: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-and-access-research-and-development