Call for applications: Newberry/NEH seminar, “Bridging National Borders in North America”

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University Faculty
Monday, June 2, 2014 to Friday, June 27, 2014
Deadline to apply: March 4, 2014

The Newberry Library’s Dr. William Scholl Center for American History and Culture will host a four-week summer 2014 NEH seminar for college and university faculty that will explore the history of North America’s border and borderlands, providing participants with a stipend of $3,300.

In keeping with the recent work in the field and the collection strengths of the Newberry Library, this seminar will take a broad geographic approach, framing borderlands as distinct places at particular moments in time where no single people or sovereignty imposed its will. The organizing theme is the process of border-making.

The seminar will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent’s map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality.

Two questions will guide examinations of these developments: how did diverse peoples challenge national borders, or use or alter them for their own purposes? And, how does consideration of these topics recast our understanding of the national and intertwined histories of Mexico, the United States, and Canada?

Please visit the Newberry website for more information and how to apply. Contact Benjamin Johnson or the Scholl Center (scholl@newberry.org) for more information.

Lecture: Jon Coleman, “Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, a Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation”

August 29, 7-8pm
CE Yale Pratt Room
Jon Coleman, Professor of History, Notre Dame University
“Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, a Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation”
Support provided by the IUPUI Department of History 

In the summer of 1823, a grizzly bear mauled Hugh Glass. The animal ripped the trapper up, carving huge hunks from his body. Glass’s fellows rushed to his aid and slew the bear, but Glass’s injuries mocked their first aid. The expedition leader arranged for his funeral: two men would stay behind to bury the corpse when it finally stopped gurgling; the rest would move on. Alone in Indian country, the caretakers quickly lost their nerve. They fled, taking Glass’s gun, knife, and ammunition with them. But Glass wouldn’t die. He began crawling toward Fort Kiowa, hundreds of miles to the east, and as his speed picked up, so did his ire. The men who took his gear and left him to rot were going to pay.

Here Lies Hugh Glass springs from this legend. The acclaimed historian Jon T. Coleman delves into the accounts left by Glass’s contemporaries and the mythologizers who used his story to advance their literary and filmmaking careers. A spectacle of grit in the face of overwhelming odds, Glass sold copy and tickets. But he did much more. Through him, the grievances and frustrations of hired hunters in the early American West and the natural world they traversed and explored bled into the narrative of the nation. A marginal player who nonetheless sheds light on the terrifying drama of life on the frontier, Glass endures as a consummate survivor and a complex example of American manhood. Here Lies Hugh Glass, a vivid, often humorous portrait of a young nation and its growing pains, is a Western history like no other.

Reserve your free tickets here: