NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
• Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations
• Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

NEH awards IUPUI-Ivy Tech partnership $119,009 grant to create world religions curriculum

With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will work in partnership with Ivy Tech Community College faculty to create 150 course modules on world religions for Ivy Tech humanities classes.Photo courtesy of Center for Interfaith Cooperation.

The NEH, in Washington, D.C., recently announced it has awarded IUPUI $119,009 to conduct “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis,” a two-year study program on contemporary religious traditions in greater Indianapolis for 15 faculty members at the Indianapolis campus of Ivy Tech Community College.

Led by IUPUI professors Edward Curtis and Arthur Farnsley and Ivy Tech humanities chair Jack Cooney, the program will help the Ivy Tech faculty develop course modules on five world religions for the existing Ivy Tech humanities core, including courses on history, literature and cultural anthropology.

“This NEH grant for ‘World Religions in Greater Indianapolis’ exemplifies all we reach for at Ivy Tech Community College as we provide our students with learning opportunities which lead them to flourishing lives as well-educated citizens and as resourcefully nimble employees,” Cooney said. “We are both honored and proud to partner with our teacher colleagues at IUPUI whose vision for this substantial NEH grant is not without regard to our possibilities.”

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will operate the program, which will connect Ivy Tech faculty to experts on Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism at IUPUI, Indiana University Bloomington, Butler University and Marian University.

The program seeks not only to bolster humanities content at Ivy Tech but also to create more understanding of Central Indiana’s religious diversity, especially of recent immigrant communities.

“This project will aid faculty in helping students understand the breadth of religious traditions in America and in central Indiana,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “At a time when there are far too many examples of misunderstandings about religions, this is a vital project. I am pleased that the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, one of our outstanding research and public outreach centers, is willing to lead this project.”

Ivy Tech faculty in the program will be introduced to world religious traditions and their sacred texts, and study their significance to U.S. history and culture. After their study of a particular tradition, the faculty will then arrange discussions with members of a recent immigrant community from that tradition. The faculty will create the Ivy Tech course modules as capstone projects based on their comprehensive studies.

Participating religious communities from Central Indiana include Jews from the former Soviet Union, Russia and Ukraine; Spanish-speaking Roman Catholic Christians from Latin America; Muslims from West Africa; Hindus from India; and Buddhists from Vietnam.

“We are grateful to all of our community partners for making it possible to bring together Central Indiana’s academic experts and its rich immigrant cultures in a program for Ivy Tech faculty,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts.

NEH grants are among the most prestigious research awards in the humanities. The “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” program received one of only four grants awarded in the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges” category, for which there were 46 applications.

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the NEH supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

Freetown Village, Indiana State Museum and IUPUI host discussion on ‘Slavery by Another Name’ to Mark the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

UntitledDespite what many history books say, certain forms of slave labor continued to exist in the American South during the years between the Civil War and World War II. Scenes from the documentary Slavery by Another Name will serve as a starting point of a moderated discussion by Alex Lichtenstein, Assoc. Prof. of History at Indiana University and Brian C. Reeder, Director of Re-Entry for the Dept. of Public Safety in Indianapolis. The discussion will also include a performance by Freetown Village.

Freetown Village, Indiana State Museum, and IUPUI invite the public to a free event, featuring the film “Slavery by Another Name.” “Slavery by Another Name” is one of four powerful documentary films (The Abolitionist, Slavery by Another Name, Freedom Riders and the Loving Story) featured in a series presented by the National Endowment for Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative called, Created Equal:  America’s Civil Rights Struggle.  The film series is part of a project developed by the National Endowment for Humanities to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation with the purpose to encourage diverse communities across the country to revisit the history of civil rights in the U.S. and to reflect on the ideals of freedom and equality that have helped bridge deep racial and cultural divides in American life. These films tell a remarkable story about the importance of race in the making of American democracy, about the power of individuals to effect change, and about the historical contexts in which Americans have understood and struggled with ideas of freedom, equality, and citizenship.

Film Synopsis:
It was a shocking reality that often went unacknowledged, then and now: A huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men that lasted until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subject to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, comments that, “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

For more information about this film, please visit the PBS website.

What:     Free public discussion of excerpts from the documentary “Slavery by Another Name,” discussion to be facilitated by Alex Lichtenstein, Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University and Brian C. Reeder, Director of Re-Entry for the Department of Public Safety in Indianapolis.  There will also be a special performance by Freetown Village.
When:    Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12-1:30 p.m.
Where:  Indiana State Museum, Dean and Barbara White Auditorium
Admission is free and registration is not required.
For more information, call 317.232.1637 or visit indianamuseum.org.

NEH Creates New “Public Scholar” Grant Program Supporting Popular Scholarly Books in the Humanities

thThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced a new grant opportunity that encourages the publication of nonfiction books that apply serious humanities scholarship to subjects of general interest and appeal.

The new NEH Public Scholar awards support well-researched books in the humanities conceived and written to reach a broad readership. Books supported through this program might present a narrative history, tell the stories of important individuals, analyze significant texts, provide a synthesis of ideas, revive interest in a neglected subject, or examine the latest thinking on a topic. Most importantly, they should open up important and appealing subjects for wider audiences by presenting significant humanities topics in a way that is accessible to general readers.

“At the Endowment we take very seriously the idea, expressed in our founding legislation, that the humanities belong to all the people of the United States,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams.  “In announcing the new Public Scholar program we hope to challenge humanities scholars to think creatively about how specialized research can benefit a wider public.”

The NEH Public Scholar program represents a long-term commitment at NEH to encourage scholarship in the humanities for general audiences. The grant program forms part of a new agency-wide initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The Public Scholar program is open to both independent scholars and individuals affiliated with scholarly institutions. It offers a stipend of $4,200 per month for a period of six to twelve months. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a twelve-month period. Applicants must have previously published a book or monograph with a university or commercial press, or articles and essays that reach a wide readership.

Application guidelines and a list of F.A.Q.’s for the Public Scholar program are available online at www.neh.gov. The application deadline for the first cycle of Public Scholar grants is March 3, 2015.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Media Contacts: Paula Wasley at (202) 606-8424 or pwasley@neh.gov

Indiana Humanities & Indiana Landmarks Grant Workshop Opportunities

indexindexa;dfjIndiana Humanities & Indiana Landmarks invite you to a Grant Workshop on Dec. 5, 2014, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The workshop will be held at Indiana Landmarks, 1201 Central Avenue, Indianapolis.

Focusing on opportunities for funding public programs in history, preservation, literature and related fields, the workshop will provide information on available grants, offer examples of innovative projects and give you a chance to meet grants officers and colleagues. Senior program officer Chrissy Cortina will talk about grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Advance registration is required. More information at: www.indianahumanities.org/Grants or contact Nancy Conner, 800.675.8897 or nconner@indianahumanities.org.

National Endowment for the Humanities Grants Available Now

NEH LogoSustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC): Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting preventive conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections.

SCHC offers two kinds of awards: 1. PLANNING−To help an institution develop and assess preventive conservation strategies, grants will support planning projects, which may encompass such activities as site visits, risk assessments, planning sessions, monitoring, testing, modeling, project-specific research, and preliminary designs for implementation projects. Planning grants must focus on exploring sustainable preventive conservation strategies. 2. IMPLEMENTATION−Projects should be based on planning that has been specific to the needs of the institution and its collections within the context of its local environment. It is not necessary to receive an NEH planning grant to be eligible for an implementation grant. Planning could be supported by NEH, other federal agencies, private foundations, or an institution’s internal funds. Projects that seek to implement preventive conservation measures in sustainable ways are especially encouraged. ! Deadline: December 3, 2014. http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections

Digital Projects for the Public: NEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring humanities ideas alive for people of all ages and all walks of life. The Digital Projects for the Public program supports projects such as websites, mobile applications, games, and virtual environments that significantly contribute to the public’s engagement with humanities ideas. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. Digital Projects for the Public grants support projects that are largely created for digital platforms. While these projects can take many forms, shapes, and size! s, you should apply to this program primarily to create digital projects or the digital components of a larger project. NEH is a national funding agency, so these projects should demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. Projects can have specific targeted audiences (including K-12 students), but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience. Deadline: June 11, 2015. http://www.neh.gov/grants/public/digital-projects-the-public

NEH seminar offers K-12 teachers an opportunity for academic study of Muslim American identities

Edward E. Curtis IV

Edward E. Curtis IV

The academic study of Muslim American history and life is the focus of a summer seminar open to K-12 teachers.

Applications are now being accepted for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present,” to be held July 12 to Aug. 1, 2015, in Indianapolis.

Sixteen teachers from across the country will be selected for the three-week seminar during which they will discuss the racial, ethnic, religious and gender identities of U.S. Muslims.

Directed by Edward E. Curtis IV, an award-winning scholar of Islam in America and holder of the Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the seminar will focus on the academic study of Muslim American identities, not the religious or spiritual beliefs or habits of the participating teachers.

Participants will study 30 primary source documents written by Muslim Americans, listen to distinguished guest lecturers Kambiz Ghanea Bassiri and Juliane Hammer, and visit two local mosques. They will also work on individual research projects on topics such as Muslim American slave narratives, Islamic hip-hop, Muslim American food cultures and Muslim American political engagement.

“My primary aim is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which teachers try to answer a key question of our time: What does it mean to be both Muslim and American?” said Curtis, who is the author of “Muslims in America, among other books.

The seminar will meet almost daily in the Campus Center on the IUPUI campus. In addition to meeting rooms, the IUPUI Campus Center houses a bookstore, a credit union and a food court.

As one of seven campuses administered by Indiana University, IUPUI is known as Indiana’s premier urban research and health sciences campus. IUPUI has more than 30,000 students enrolled in 17 schools, which offer more than 250 degrees. IUPUI awards degrees from both Indiana and Purdue universities. The campus is near the heart of downtown Indianapolis. Several major cultural attractions and affordable restaurants are within walking distance or a brief bus ride.

All seminar participants receive a $2,700 stipend to help cover transportation, food, housing and other costs. Housing is available on campus. Teachers in public and private schools are encouraged to apply.

Funding for the summer seminar comes from the National Endowment for the Humanities, an independent federal agency that supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

Deadline: March 2.

For additional information about the seminar, teachers should address their questions to Edward E. Curtis IV by phone at (317) 278-1683 or email: ecurtis4@iupui.edu

Poet to direct ‘Cadaver, Speak’ reading in collaboration between schools of liberal arts, medicine

"Cadaver, Speak" cover

“Cadaver, Speak” cover

Poet Marianne Boruch will direct a readers’ theater performance of her latest poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive.

“Cadaver, Speak” is Boruch’s eighth collection of poetry. The collection is centered on a sequence of 30 poems — narrated by a 99-year-old woman who is dissected as part of an anatomy class — that explore issues of life and death, knowledge and bodies. Six students from the IU School of Medicine and five students from the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI will read segments of “Cadaver, Speak” with Boruch.

“Marianne Boruch gets us to confront the most intimate details of our lives in a language that is both talky and imagistically rich,” says Karen Kovacik, professor of English at IUPUI and former Indiana Poet Laureate. “Thanks to the wily narrator of this poem, the human body becomes a site of wonder.”

The reading, free and open to the public, is part of the 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI.

Boruch will also talk about the poem on WFYI’s “Sound Medicine” at 2 p.m. Oct. 26.

Boruch, who teaches creative writing at Purdue University, has published in The New Yorker magazine and was anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and she was a Fulbright/visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012. In 2013, she received the prestigious Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for her previous collection, “The Book of Hours.” She also completed a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center.

Emily Beckman, assistant clinical professor in the medical humanities and health studies program and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, said the reading will be especially beneficial to first-year medical students.

“Students need to realize that the body on which they are working used to belong to a living, breathing human being with a story,” she said. “Boruch’s poem aims to not only tell that story, but encourages us to consider the individual, unique stories of all who are seeking healing.”

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading Series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is also made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

The Oct. 30 reading is co-sponsored by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts IUPUI as well as the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. The event was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Riley Hospital outpatient parking garage, 575 Riley Hospital Drive; the University Hospital garage, 600 University Blvd.; and the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.

RSVPs are requested to medhum@iupui.edu or 317-278-1669.

 

Curtis awarded for NEH Summer Seminar about Muslim American Identity

curtis-home

Edward E. Curtis IV

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in Washington, D.C, has announced that Edward Curtis, Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies, has been awarded $114,438 to conduct a national seminar for school teachers on “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present.”

The three-week seminar, which will take place on the IUPUI campus in the summer of 2015, will give sixteen school teachers from around the country the opportunity to explore the history and diverse cultures of Muslims in the United States.

Participants will study thirty primary source documents, hear from two visiting experts, make field trips to two local mosques, and use the resources of the IUPUI University Library to complete individual research projects.

“My primary goal,” said Curtis, “is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which school teachers can answer a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American?”

In order to answer that question, Curtis will emphasize the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and religious interpretation in the making of Muslim American identities.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which has offered numerous seminars and professional development opportunities for young scholars and school teachers, will support the logistical aspects of the program.

Funding for NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes is provided by the federal government, and grants are awarded through a rigorous and selective process of peer review.

“Understanding the rich diversity of Muslim American identities in a balanced and informed manner,” Curtis concluded, “can be a powerful means of bridging cultures inside the United States and beyond.”

NEH Challenge Grants

NEH LogoNEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.

Award Amount: NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $75,000 to $500,000. Requests for more than $500,000 are unlikely to be funded at that level. Note that the program encourages requests for smaller grants for sharply defined purposes.
Fund-raising: NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered. HBCUs, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and two-year colleges, however, are required to raise only two times the federal amount.
Eligibility: With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.
Limitation: One per campus. Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward by October 1, 2014 for internal competition.

  • 1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.
  • A Letter from the Chair or Dean
  • 2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

Limited Submission 

Deadlines:
IU Internal Deadline
: 10/1/2014
Preliminary Draft Deadline: 3/24/2015
Prospective applicants who wish to submit a preliminary draft proposal should do so four to six weeks before the application deadline.
NEH Proposal Deadline: 5/5/2015

NOTE UPDATED INTERNAL DEADLINE: The NEH Program Officer indicated that selected applicants should begin raising required matches as early as December.

Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.