Enduring Questions Course Development Grants

NEH LogoThe National Endowment for the Humanities offers grants of up to $38,000 to support the development of a new course that will foster intellectual community through the study of an enduring question.

Deadline: September 11, 2014

For more information about Enduring Questions, please visit http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/enduring-questions.

Program Details

What is good government? What is friendship? Are there universals in human nature? What are the origins of the universe?

Enduring Questions grants support the development by up to four faculty members of a new course on a fundamental concern of human life that is addressed by the humanities. This question-driven course encourages undergraduates and teachers to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential ideas, works, and thinkers over the centuries and into the present day.

Enduring questions persist across historical eras, societies, and regions of the world; they inform intellectual, ethical, artistic, and religious traditions; they engage thoughtful people from all walks of life; they transcend time and place and yet are immediate and present in our lives. Enduring questions have more than one plausible or compelling answer, allow for dialogue across generations, and inspire genuine intellectual pluralism.

An Enduring Questions course may be taught by faculty from any department or discipline in the humanities or by faculty outside the humanities (for example, astronomy, biology, economics, law, mathematics, medicine, or psychology), as long as humanities sources are central to the course.

Recent Projects

  • Macomb Community College, Elliot Meyrowitz: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Just War”
  • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Padma Viswanathan: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Literature and Morality”
  • Middlebury College, Timothy Billings: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Translation”
  • University of North Georgia, Renee Bricker, Donna Gessell, Michael Proulx, and George Wrisley: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Peace”

Questions?

Consult the grant guidelines and frequently asked questions online.

Contact us:
enduringquestions@neh.gov
(202) 606-8380

Learn More
NEH Grant Programs and Deadlines

NEH Division of Education Programs

About NEH

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

neh_at_logoNEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations grants provide support for museums, libraries, historic places, and other organizations that produce public programs in the humanities.

Grants support the following formats:

  • exhibitions at museums, libraries, and other venues;
  • interpretations of historic places, sites, or regions; and
  • book/film discussion programs; living history presentations; and other face-to-face programs at libraries, community centers, and other public venues.

NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects might include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.

Planning grants support the early stages of project development, including consultation with scholars, refinement of humanities themes, preliminary design, testing, and audience evaluation.

Program Statistics

In the last five competitions the Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants program received an average of 64 applications. The program made an average of six awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 9 percent.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely from competition to competition, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from publicpgms@neh.gov.

 

Division of Public Programs

Receipt Deadline August 13, 2014 for Projects Beginning April 2015

Questions?

Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program

dfg_logo_schriftzug_blau_orgneh_at_logoThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the United States and the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft e.V., DFG) are working together to offer support for projects that contribute to developing and implementing digital infrastructures and services for humanities research.

In order to encourage new approaches and develop innovative methods in any field of the humanities, these grants provide funding for up to three years in any of the following areas:

  • developing innovative methods—as well as standards and best practices—for building and merging digital collections that are significant and of major current interest, for use in humanities research;
  • developing and implementing generic tools, methods, and techniques for accessing and processing digital resources relevant to humanities research;
  • creating new digital modes of scholarly communication and publishing that facilitate international cooperation and dissemination of humanities scholarship; and
  • developing models for effectively managing digital data generated in humanities research projects (for example, texts, audio files, photographs, 3D objects) and exemplifying those models in case studies.

Collaboration between U.S. and German partners is a key requirement for this grant category. Each application must be sponsored by at least one eligible German individual or institution, and at least one U.S. institution (see Section III, Eligibility, below), and there must be a project director from each country. The partners will collaborate to write a single application package. The U.S. partner will submit the package to NEH via Grants.gov, and the German partner will submit it to DFG via regular postal service and preferably also by e-mail.

Program Statistics

In the first four competitions the NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program received an average of nineteen applications per year. The program made an average of five awards per year, for a funding ratio of 27 percent.

The potential applicant pool for this program is limited, since applications require international cooperation between German and US institutions.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely year to year, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from odh@neh.gov.

Receipt Deadline September 25, 2014 for Projects Beginning May 2015

Questions?

If you have questions about the program, contact the Office of Digital Humanities staff at odh@neh.gov. Applicants wishing to speak to a staff member by telephone should provide in the e-mail message a telephone number and a preferred time to call.

How to Apply for Funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities

How to Apply for Funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities

Wednesday, September 18, 2013
2:00pm – 3:00pm
University Library, Room 1116

Please be sure to register for this webinar, which shows faculty and administrators how to apply for funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Register here: https://crm.iu.edu/CRMEvents/NEHWebinar/