RESEARCH NOTICE| NEA Art Works & Challenge America – Limited Submission

Internal Campus Deadline: 1/20/2016Indiana University-logo

Art Works – NEA Feb deadline
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3692
NEA Application Deadline: 2/18/2016


Art Works – NEA July deadline

http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3693
NEA Application Deadline: 7/14/2016

Challenge America Fast-Track
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3694
NEA Application Deadline: 4/14/2016

For Complete Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

ARTWORKS Brief Description:

The guiding principle of “Art Works” is at the center of everything we do at the NEA. “Art Works” refers to three things: the works of art themselves, the ways art works on audiences, and the fact that art is work for the artists and arts professionals who make up the field. Art works by enhancing the value of individuals and communities, by connecting us to each other and to something greater than ourselves, and by empowering creativity and innovation in our society and economy. The arts exist for beauty itself, but they also are an inexhaustible source of meaning and inspiration. The NEA welcomes projects that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  •  Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other advances in the field.

See the website to determine a specific discipline’s deadline (Feb or July).

ARTWORKS Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

CHALLENGE AMERICA Brief Description:

The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development. This category encourages and supports the following objective:

  • Engagement: Engaging the public with diverse and excellent art. CHALLENGE AMERICA Award Amount:
  • All Fast-Track grants are for $10,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Grants generally are smaller in scope and shorter in duration than other projects supported under these guidelines. It is anticipated that most projects – including planning and close-out time – will be substantially shorter.

Limitation: One per Campus

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2017 Art Works guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One each for a parent organization that comprises separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana, WFIU and WTIU.
  • One from each campus as the lead for a distinctly different project.

This shared limitation of one per campus applies to L0406 Challenge America Fast-Track (4/14/2016 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 2/18/2016 and 7/14/2016 deadlines).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: NEA Notice of Intent.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) listing the discipline of interest at the top.
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Research Notice| NEA Art Works: Creativity Connects – Limited Submission

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3695Indiana University-logo

IU Campus Internal Deadline: 1/20/2016
NEA Application Deadline: 3/3/2016

URL For Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

Brief Description:
Creativity Connects is an initiative that will show how the arts are central to the country’s creativity ecosystem, investigate how support systems for the arts have changed, explore how the arts connect with other industries, and invest in innovative projects to spark new ideas for the arts field.

A key component to the Creativity Connects initiative is a pilot grant opportunity in the Art Works category to support partnerships between arts organizations and organizations from non-arts sectors that include, but are not limited to, business, education, environment, faith, finance, food, health, law, science, and technology.

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants will seek to benefit the arts and non-arts sectors by:

  • Demonstrating the value of working with the arts.
  • Supporting the infrastructure for the arts to work in new ways with new sectors.
  • Building bridges that create new relationships and constituencies.
  • Creating innovative partnership projects to advance common goals.

Award Amount:

  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $20,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $40,000 and the official applicant organization must provide at least $20,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants generally will range from $20,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $20,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact.
  • The National Endowment for the Arts’ support of a project can start no sooner than January 1, 2017. Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years.

Eligibility:

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants require a partnership between an arts organization and an organization from a non-arts sector. An arts organization must serve as the official applicant and have a non-arts partner confirmed at the time of application.

Limitation: One per campus

  • An organization may submit only one application for an Art Works: Creativity Connects grant.
  • An organization that submits an application to Art Works: Creativity Connects is still eligible to submit an application to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities including other areas of Art Works (L0468a & L0468b) and Challenge America (L0406). In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: L1015 Notice of Intent.

  •  1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
  •  A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Reiberg Reading Series: Dan Wakefield

Dan WakefieldThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Dan Wakefield

Date: November 4, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St.
Get your free tickets here

A native of Indianapolis, Dan Wakefield is a novelist, journalist and screenwriter whose books include Revolt in the South, Going All The Way, New York in the Fifties, The Hijacking of Jesus: How the Religious Right Distorts Christianity and Promotes Prejudice and Hate, and many more. His best-selling novels Going All The Way and Starting Over were produced as feature films. He has recently edited If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young, a selection of commencement speeches by Kurt Vonnegut, a longtime friend.

Wakefield has been the recipient of a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism, the Bernard DeVoto Fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Rockefeller Grant for Creative Writing, and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has taught in the writing programs at Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Emerson College, The Iowa Writers Workshop, and is presently Writer in Residence at Florida International University in Miami. He has been a staff writer for The Nation, a Contributing Editor of The Atlantic Monthly, a Contributing Writer for GQ, a Contributing Editor of The Yoga Journal, and is on the advisory board of Image: A Journal of The Arts and Religion.

In 2015, NUVO awarded Wakefield the Lifetime Achievement Cultural Vision Award.

Sponsored by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of English, IUPUI University Library, IUPUI University College, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, IU School of Informatics, IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Indiana University researchers awarded grant to study employment behavior of artists

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — With a newly announced grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, two Indiana University researchers will examine key economic issues facing IU Logoartists.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs faculty members Doug Noonan and Joanna Woronkowicz will use data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey and data from crowdfunding websites including Kickstarter and Indiegogo to study these questions:

What was the effect of the Great Recession on the employment of artists and how have they fared during the recovery?
How do crowdfunding campaigns for arts projects differ in their results from similar campaigns for technology and other non-arts projects?

The $15,000 research grant is one of only 19 research projects nationwide funded by the NEA through its Research: Art Works program.

“We want to better understand the role of artists in creating economic value,” Noonan said. “We want to develop data that shows the impact of artists on the economic fabric of society.”

Tracking employment and salary for artists is difficult because of the nature of their work. They have flexibility in schedules, often hold multiple jobs and can be footloose in regard to where they live and work.

“We know a good deal about artists from data taken at a particular moment in time, but this research goes in a new direction,” Woronkowicz said. “By studying how artists work and move across years and during a sustained and challenging economic period, we can get a much broader understanding of how they survive and how, as a society, we can help them thrive.”

Noonan and Woronkowicz will analyze data from the 2003-14 Current Population Surveys as well as data from Kickstarter and Indiegogo from 2009 to 2014.

“We hope to create data sets that other researchers can use to further define the economic contributions of artists,” Noonan said. “They enrich our lives in so many ways, but too little is known about the many ways artists earn a living.”

Noonan is a professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is also research director for the IU Public Policy Institute. Woronkowicz is an assistant professor at SPEA at IU Bloomington.

NEA Chair Jane Chu to Present at Arts Symposium at IUPUI

 Jane Chu Image courtesy NEA

Indiana University alumna Jane Chu, chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, will join arts leaders from around the country at a symposium in Indianapolis on Saturday, March 7.

The theme is “Community Engagement and Development Through the Arts” and it is led by arts administration faculty at the IU Bloomington School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

“This is a great way to honor the work of Dr. Chu and a chance to share the experiences and insights of arts leaders from across the U.S. whose work is directly tied to the quality of life and development of their cities and regions,” SPEA’s Michael Rushton said.

The event begins at 8:30 a.m. in the Basile Auditorium at the Herron School of Art and Design on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. It is open to the public, but organizers request attendees RSVP to soprsvp@iupui.edu.

Chu has been chair of the National Endowment for the Arts since June and formerly served as president and CEO of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City, Mo. She earned her doctorate in philanthropic studies from the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy in Indianapolis.

Chu will speak about the direction of the NEA as it relates to creative placemaking, including trends and plans for the future. Her address will follow a symposium with two panels. SPEA IU Bloomington professor Joanna Woronkowicz will moderate the first panel on the role of arts organizations in community engagement. Panelists include:

  • Laura Zabel, executive director of Springboard for the Arts in St. Paul, Minn.
  • Joan Squires, president of Omaha Performing Arts in Nebraska.

Rushton will moderate the second discussion on the role of arts funders with panelists:

  • Jennifer Cole, executive director of the Metro Nashville Arts Commission.
  • Karen Gahl-Mills, executive director of the Cuyahoga Arts and Culture in Cleveland.

At the conclusion of the IUPUI symposium, Chu will travel to Bloomington for a visit to the Jacobs School of Music and to attend an IU Opera Theater production of “South Pacific.”

Chu’s visit to Indiana will also include a meeting with all current NEA grantees in Indiana and a site visit to the Indianapolis Art Center with the Indiana Arts Commission, as well as meetings with SPEA IUPUI students and with the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s students, board of visitors, faculty and staff.

This is her second recent visit to the region; she delivered the IU Bloomington 2014 winter commencement address in December.

Support for the symposium has been made possible by grants from the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, USA Funds, Tom and Bonnie Reilly, and the Ball Brothers Foundation, as well as from IUPUI. The host organizations for the Chu visit include SPEA IU Bloomington, SPEA IUPUI, Herron School, Indiana Arts Commission, Jacobs School of Music at IU Bloomington, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI.

To attend the symposium, RSVP to Nancy Bell by March 1.

 

Community Engagement and Development Through the Arts Symposium to feature Dr. Jane Chu, Chairwoman, National Endowment for the Arts

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NEA Literature Fellowships: Prose, FY 2016 Applications Now Available

thThe Arts Endowment’s support of a project may begin any time between January 1, 2016, and January 1, 2017, and extend for up to two years. The NEA Literature Fellowships program offers $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Applications are reviewed through an anonymous process in which the only criteria for review are artistic excellence and artistic merit. To review the applications, the NEA assembles a different advisory panel every year, each diverse with regard to geography, race and ethnicity, and artistic points of view. The NEA Literature Fellowships program operates on a two-year cycle with fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years. For FY 2016, which is covered by these guidelines, fellowships in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) are available. Fellowships in poetry will be offered in FY 2017 and guidelines will be available in the fall of 2015. You may apply only once each year. Competition for fellowships is extremely rigorous. We typically receive more than 1,000 applications each year in this category and award fellowships to fewer than 5% of applicants. You should consider carefully whether your work will be competitive at the national level.

Deadline: Mar 11, 2015 You must submit your application electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your validated and accepted application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on March 11, 2015.