Tag Archive for music

Ethnomusicologist, conductor, and activist André de Quadros keynotes symposium on global health and music

photo andre de quadros
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium in University Library – UL0130

Professor André de Quadros, Boston University, will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 pre-conference symposium of the Society for Ethnomusicology. His presentation is titled “Music, the Arts, and Global Health–in Search of Sangam, its Theory, and Paradigms.”

Music and the other arts have the potential to mobilize poor communities and provide meaningful contexts for health education and empowerment. Artists have a social justice responsibility to work together with public health professions to explore the power of personal and community agency, self-knowledge, and social change in the face of widespread health concerns. André de Quadros will discuss music’s capacity, with other arts, to communicate in uniquely complex and subtle ways that offer significant potential for health.

Professor de Quadros has conducted research in over forty countries. His research and practitioner interests are in health literacy in sites of urban dispossession, incarceration, and conflict. He is a member of the Scientific Board of the International Network for Singing Hospitals, the International Advisory Board of the Asian Institute of Public Health, the Board of the International Federation for Choral Music, the Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed journal Arts and Health, and the steering committee of Conductors without Borders.

This lecture is open to the public. For more information about this talk, please see the flyer, or email medhum@iupui.edu.

IAHI Lecture: Jace Clayton, “Sounds Create Social Meaning”

Jace Clayton

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is teaming up with our friends at We Are City to support another round of artists-in-residence in Indianapolis as part of the We Are City [SUMMIT] Series.

This November, artists Jace Clayton (a.k.a. DJ/rupture) and Rocio Rodriguez Salceda will use fashion design and participatory performance to explore how group affiliation interacts with civic memory in Indianapolis.

While in residence, Clayton will give a public lecture hosted by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Herron School of Art and Design. Tickets are free but space is limited.

Eskenazi Hall Room: HR 111 A – Basile Center Classroom
735 W. New York St. – Indianapolis
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
11:45 am-12:45 pm

Free Tickets: http://jaceclayton.eventbrite.com

 

About the Artists

Jace Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on core concerns for how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South.

 

Rocio Rodriguez Salceda is an artist from Madrid who operates in the space between visual art, fashion design, and social practice.

An Evening with Whiskey Bent Valley

Whiskey Bent Valley Boys

November 14
7:00-8:30pm
Indianapolis Arts Garden

Tickets free to the public. Reserve your ticket below.

Hailing from the back woods of PeWee Valley, Kentucky, Whiskey Bent Valley pays homage to their southern musical roots.  The Whiskey Bent Valley Boys are JR on the barnyard fiddle; Mason Dixon on the clawhammer, banjo, mandolin, and guitar; Leroy Joneson the bass; and Chance Wagner on the banjo.

Incorporating time honored treasures from such icons as Roscoe Holcomb, The Stanley Brothers, and Tommy Jarrell, the band’s original compositions include ballads, breakdowns, sea shanties, and swamp stomps.

IUPUI Music Academy turns children into composers

Children composing

Don’t tell the youngsters sitting in front of large computer monitors with earphones clamped to their ears that they are engaged in something serious like problem solving. They are having too much fun composing music tracks in an IUPUI Music Academy summer class.

The children are creating six 33-bar tracks using the Garage Band software, which allows users to become composers, regardless of their knowledge of music.

“It’s really fun,” said 9-year-old Lilly. Cameron, 11, looked forward to showing his father his latest compositions. “I showed him what I had done (in a previous) class. He was kind of confused, but I helped him.”

The children are among 35 youths from an all-day sports camp at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis who were enrolled in the weeklong Music Academy class, which meets for 90 minutes a day.

The IUPUI Music Academy is an independent community music school, operating under the auspices of the Department of Music and Arts Technology in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI. It was established in 1996 as an outreach program for the communities surrounding the IUPUI campus.

In addition to engaging with the sports camp youngsters this summer, the Music Academy also worked with 74 TRIO Upward Bound first-generation college-bound students and 35 high school girls from across the country who participated in the School of Engineering and Technology’s Preparing Outstanding Women for Engineering Roles program, sponsored by Rolls-Royce. The classes for the high school students have concluded.

Participants in Preparing Outstanding Women for Engineering Roles are invited to the program after expressing an interest in that field. The weeklong experience includes activities like a trip to the Honda auto plant, where the girls met with female engineers. It also includes sessions devoted to GarageBand.

GarageBand strikes a natural chord with younger people, said E.J. Choe, an assistant professor of music and director of the IUPUI Music Academy. “The Christmas wish list of this generation begins with products whose names begin with the letter ‘I’: iPad, iPhone, iPod.

“This marries an old art form with technology, which lures them into music, whether they play an instrument or not,” she said. “Everyone wants to be a composer, and kids quickly learn how to use the software to do it.”

There is a strong connection between engineering and music, said Terri Talbert-Hatch, assistant dean of student services. “Introducing them to GarageBand is a way to show them that technology can be fun. The name of the GarageBand class may not have the word engineering in it, but it’s all about technology, solving problems and being creative.”