Reception and Lecture | “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab” by Marianne Boruch on Oct. 30

Cadaver SpeakMarianne Boruch, “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab”
October 30, 2014
Reception: 6:00, Performance: 7:00-8:30
IUPUI Emerson Hall, Auditorium, EH 304
545 Barnhill Dr.

Some books begin as a dare to the self. Marianne Boruch’s newest collection, Cadaver, Speak, is an unsettling double, a heart of two chambers. The first half is attuned to history — how time hits us, and grief — and to art and its making. The second half, the title sequence, is spoken by a ninety-nine-year-old who donated her body for dissection by medical students, a laboratory experience in which the poet, duly silenced, was privileged to take part. Born from lyric impulse, which is Boruch’s scalpel, her work examines love, death, beauty, and knowledge—the great subjects of poetry made new by a riveting reimagining.

Marianne Boruch was born in Chicago in 1950. She is the author of seven collections of poetry including The Book of Hours (Copper Canyon Press, 2011), two volumes of essays on poetry, and a memoir. After receiving her MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she founded the MFA program at Purdue University in 1987. In addition to teaching at Purdue University, she also teaches at the low-residency MFA program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. Her recent awards include the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award (2013), and a Fulbright/Visiting professorship at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Literature and Medicine Student Interest Group and the Department of Anatomy (IU School of Medicine), the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program, and the Department of English (IU School of Liberal Arts).

“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

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Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.

Award: Medical Humanities Student Essay Award

The Medical Humanities Student Essay Award, sponsored by the IUPUI Medical Humanities – Health Studies Program, is given to a student at IUPUI whose writing is judged to be the best on a topic in medical humanities and health studies. This book award recognizes the work of students in understanding health and medicine from the perspectives of the Humanities, Law, and Social Sciences.  This competition is open to both undergraduate and graduate/professional students on the IUPUI campus.

Selection Process: Papers are judged by members of the Medical Humanities Program Committee and affiliated experts.  The award is presented and winners recognized at the annual Liberal Arts Honors Convocation ceremonies.  Undergraduate papers are judged separately from graduate papers.

Criteria: The paper must be written by an undergraduate or graduate/professional student for a course taken at IUPUI, and written within the past two academic years on a subject that utilizes the perspectives of the humanities or health studies (i.e., ethical, legal, social, historical, etc.) to gain a broader understanding of medicine and healthcare. Graduate theses and dissertations are not eligible for this award.

Submissions: The typical paper should be between 10 to 25 pages in length.  Papers are to be submitted electronically as a Microsoft Word or pdf document with a separate title page document, both of which should be attached to an email and sent to jizukac@iupui.edu by the annual deadline. Confirmations of receipt of entries will be emailed to the applicants. Entries received after the deadline cannot be accepted or considered for the competition.

For questions or more information, please call (317) 274-4740 or email Judi Campbell at jizukac@iupui.edu.