Tag Archive for McKinney School of Law

Leibman Forum to tackle legal and cultural issues surrounding ‘The Art of the Steal’

photo laura holzman

Was the $25 billion art collection of Albert C. Barnes “stolen” decades after his death, as some say, or was it simply “moved in the public interest”?

Art and legal pundits and interested others can judge for themselves during a lively examination of the facts during the annual Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art on Friday, Nov. 1, at the IU McKinney School of Law.

This year’s forum, “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest,” examines the issues raised in the film “The Art of the Steal,” a documentary about the disposition of the Barnes collection. The program includes a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion featuring legal, art and philanthropic experts.

“Donor Intent vs. Public Interest” takes place from 4 to 8 p.m. in Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. The film screening takes place at 4 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 6 p.m., both in Wynne Courtroom. A reception will follow the discussion at 7:15 p.m. in the Atrium.

At his death in 1951, Barnes had amassed a matchless collection of modern and post-impressionist art. He also left a will with strict instructions for the collection to remain forever at an original location in a Philadelphia suburb. After a battle that included a lawsuit by one faction of Philadelphia residents and a countersuit by another, the collection was relocated to downtown Philadelphia in 2012.

The public debate over moving the collection was one of the most “significant, heated and widespread debates about art, culture and place in Philadelphia” around the turn of the 21st century, said Laura Holzman, a forum panelist.

Holzman, assistant professor of art history and museum studies at the Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is working on a book project about civil discourse and visual culture that includes a study of the discourse about moving the Barnes collection.

“The use of extreme language (like describing the relocated collection as ‘stolen’) is significant because it demonstrates the fervor behind people’s beliefs about what was best for the collection and its publics,” Holzman said. “It also suggests that debates about the ethics of relocation were steeped in concerns about cultural capital, or who has ownership of the art.”

Other forum speakers are:

  • Kenan Farrell, attorney and adjunct professor teaching art and museum law at IU McKinney School of Law.
  • Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for collections and exhibitions at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Robert A. Katz, professor of law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of philanthropic studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

An additional free screening of “The Art of the Steal” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Room 375, Inlow Hall. Online registration is suggested.

The Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum was established at IUPUI in 2004 to examine issues on the legal and business environment of the arts. It is co-sponsored by the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design and the IU Kelley School of Business Indianapolis.

The forum is free of change, but registration is required online. Indiana continuing legal education credit of 1.4 hour is available free of charge.

For questions, contact Beth Young at ejmoody@iupui.edu.

Film and Panel Discussion: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal


liebman forum poster
Annual Jordan and Joan Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal
Friday, November 1, 2013
Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Lawrence W. Inlow Hall IU McKinney School of Law
530 W New York St

4:00 p.m. Screening of The Art of the Steal, 6:00 p.m. panel discussion; 7:15 p.m. reception in the Atrium.

Described as a not-to-be-missed look at one of the art world’s most fascinating controversies and a celebrated selection of the Toronto, New York and AFI Film Festivals, Don Argott’s gripping documentary THE ART OF THE STEAL chronicles the long and dramatic struggle for control of the Barnes Foundation, a private collection of art valued at more than $25 billion.

In 1922, Dr. Albert C. Barnes formed a remarkable educational institution around his priceless collection of art, located just five miles outside of Philadelphia. Now, more than 50 years after Barnes’ death, a powerful group of moneyed interests have gone to court for control of the art, and intend to bring it to a new museum in Philadelphia. Standing in their way is a group of Barnes’ former students and his will, which contains strict instructions stating the Foundation should always be an educational institution, and that the paintings may never be removed. Will they succeed, or will a man’s will be broken and one of America’s greatest cultural monuments be destroyed?

Watch The Art of the Steal, the award-winning documentary, and then join in a lively examination of this turn of events with expert panelists from IUPUI and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Speakers:

Kenan L. Farrell, founder, KLF Legal and adjunct professor at IU McKinney School of Law. Farrell’s practice encompasses intellectual property, media, entertainment and business law. He teaches Art and Museum Law. He is also president of the Indianapolis Downtown Artists and Dealers Association (IDADA).

Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for Collections and Exhibitions,Indianapolis Museum of Art. Haigh manages all exhibitions and collections-related activities for the IMA. She developed the Museum Property Act in the State of Ohio and implemented the first collections management database at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Laura Holzman, assistant professor of Art History and Museum Studies, Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Holzman is a public scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art. She holds a Ph.D. in visual studies from the University of California, Irvine. Her current book in progress includes a study of the Barnes collection move.

Robert A. Katz, professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of Philanthropic Studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Katz is an expert in the law of nonprofit organizations and chairs the Association of American Law School’s Nonprofit and Philanthropy Law Section. His recent scholarship focuses on social enterprise and for-profit enterprises that seek to combine profitability with social mission.

Additional Free Screenings of The Art of the Steal:

  • Wednesday, October 16, 7:00 p.m., Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design
  • Tuesday, October 29, 6:00 p.m., Wynne Courtroom (room 100), IU McKinney School of Law

Parking for McKinney School of Law: Parking is available for a nominal fee at the campus Gateway Garage, located on the corner of Michigan and California streets (address is 525 Blackford Street). Parking is also available for a nominal fee at the Sports Complex Garage two blocks west of the law school.

Parking for Herron School of Art and Design: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up. Parking in the surface lot west of Herron requires a valid IUPUI parking permit.

This event is a joint project of The IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design, and the IU Kelley School of Business.

Gerard Magliocca presents new book: “American Founding Son”

book jacket Magliocca founding son
Faculty Book Talks at IU McKinney School of Law
September 10, 2013
5:00-7:00 pm
Wynne Courtroom and Atrium, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York Street, Indianapolis, IN.

American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of the Fourteenth Amendment, by Gerard Magliocca

Professor Gerard Magliocca, a Samuel R. Rosen Professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law presents his new book from New York University Press. John Bingham was the architect of the rebirth of the United States following the Civil War. A leading antislavery lawyer and congressman from Ohio, Bingham wrote the most important part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees fundamental rights and equality to all Americans. He was also at the center of two of the greatest trials in history, giving the closing argument in the military prosecution of John Wilkes Booth’s co-conspirators for the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and in the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. And more than any other man, Bingham played the key role in shaping the Union’s policy towards the occupied ex-Confederate States, with consequences that still haunt our politics.

American Founding Son provides the most complete portrait yet of this remarkable statesman. Drawing on his personal letters and speeches, the book traces Bingham’s life from his humble roots in Pennsylvania through his career as a leader of the Republican Party. Magliocca argues that Bingham and his congressional colleagues transformed the Constitution that the Founding Fathers created, and did so with the same ingenuity that their forbears used to create a more perfect union in the 1780s. In this book, Magliocca restores Bingham to his rightful place as one of our great leaders.

Lecture: 5:00 pm. Reception & book signing: 6:00 pm. CLE: 1.0 hour of Indiana CLE credit (pending approval). No fee, but registration required.

Contact: Shaun Dankoski at sldanko@iupui.edu