IUPUI announces new degrees focused on law in liberal arts and informatics

imagesThe Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a proposal for two new degrees at IUPUI: One prepares undergraduate students for careers as paralegals, and the other provides a path for students to transition rapidly into in-demand and well-paid information technology jobs.

IUPUI will ask the Indiana Commission for Higher Education for final approval to offer the degrees beginning in the fall.

“These programs are the latest examples of IUPUI’s tradition of developing distinctive programs that respond to student demand and meet employer needs,” said IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Nasser Paydar.

The proposed Bachelor of Arts in law in liberal arts degree expands the certificate in paralegal studies now offered by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, providing students with additional education and training and the baccalaureate degree increasingly required by employers. Students in the past could take the certificate in addition to a Bachelor of Arts degree in another discipline. But that required at least six courses beyond their degree, which burdened students with added expense and time.

The degree will provide students with the theoretical and conceptual components of the law and an introduction to the court system and legal procedures. Students will develop practical, real-world legal skills with courses in legal research, legal writing and litigation skills. In addition, students will be able to tailor the curriculum according to their own interests by selecting a number of elective courses from various legal specialties, including criminal law, family law, estate law and a variety of business law courses.

The second new program is a master’s degree offered by the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI. The proposed Master of Science in informatics offers specializations in data analytics, biomedical informatics, knowledge and information management, and user experience design.

The goal of the Master of Science in informatics is to enable students to apply informatics in their respective disciplines. To achieve that goal, the department proposes first to establish the new degree itself, providing specializations from within the school; and then to offer interdisciplinary five-year B.S./M.S. programs and dual degrees with other schools at IUPUI to meet the competitive requirements of Indiana’s job market.

Informatics has become not only an integral part of many disciplines and professions but also an essential skill for graduates.

The Master of Science in informatics will expand career opportunities of undergraduate students and degree holders in nontechnical disciplines by enabling them to apply information technology skills to their own field or to transition into information technology fields.

Ebola: “Over There”…Now “Over Here” An Urgent Conversation About Ethics, Law, Public Health, and Practice

Ebola Virus

Ebola Virus

The initial outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EBV) in West Africa presented many ethical, legal, logistical and clinical challenges for first responders, clinicians, politicians and researchers. These challenges have been magnified now that EBV has crossed the Atlantic transforming the public conversation from a worrisome public health challenge over there, to one we need to address over here. A group of experts in the ethical, legal, public health and clinical care implications will discuss several key issues facing patients, practitioners and the public. Following short presentations, an open dialogue will allow for exchange of perspectives.

Eric M. Meslin, PhD-
Director, Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Associate Dean and Professor of Bioethics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Professor of Law and Bioethics, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Chad Priest, JD, MSN, RN- Assistant Dean for Operations & Community Partnerships, Indiana University School of Nursing, Co-Director, Disaster Medicine Fellowship, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine
Ross D. Silverman, JD, MPH- Professor and Acting Chair, Department of Health Policy & Management Indiana University, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health Professor of Public Health & Law, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Nicolas P. Terry, LL.M.- Hall Render Professor of Law & Director, Hall Center for Law and Health, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Co-sponsored by the Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Fairbanks School of Public Health, School of Nursing, and Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Daniel Grant, 2014 Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Daniel Grant, whose frequent reporting on the visual arts appears in ARTnews Magazine, Huffington Post and The Wall Street Journal, will speak at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s Basile Auditorium on November 5 at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Grant will present What Collectors Want: The Business, Law and Art of Art Sales as
the 2014 speaker for the Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art. His talk will focus on how artists may communicate—in person, in writings and online—with collectors, dealers and curators in ways that will help lead to exhibitions and sales.

“The key is to for artists to be entrepreneurial,” said Grant, “looking for ways to advance their own careers rather than relying upon someone else. For many up-and-coming artists, the goal is to get into a gallery. That is not necessarily synonymous with selling one’s work or supporting oneself from those sales. It is easy to get lost in the idea that a gallery equals prestige, art world acceptance and a ready group of buyers.

Grant has quoted studies that have shown a high percentage of artists are able to support themselves through their art and related skills—often flying in the face of preconceived notions about an arts education. What’s more, these studies have revealed artists to be happier with their lives than many others in higher-paying professions, at least in part because of their autonomous decision-making.

“A growing number of artists are looking at galleries as just one part—or, perhaps, not even a part at all—of their plans to show and sell work,” he said. “These artists are aware that they can speak for their art better than any third party and that, in fact, many collectors are eager to speak with the artists directly rather than with a gallery owner.”

Grant is the author of books including The Business of Being an Artist, Selling Art Without Galleries, and The Fine Artist’s Career Guide. He will take questions from the audience on all facets of being an artist or acquiring art. His books will be available for sale and autograph during the reception following the lecture.

The Leibman Lecture is a joint project of IU’s Kelley School of Business, the Robert
H. McKinney School of Law and Herron School of Art and Design—all on the campus of IUPUI. Past Leibman Lecture topics have ranged from The Art of The Steal
and The Monuments Men to U.S. Department of Treasury engraving practices and
wearable intellectual property.

Parking: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up.

NSF Grant: Law & Social Sciences (LSS)

Law & Social Sciences (LSS)(nsf12507)

The Law & Social Sciences Program considers proposals that address
social scientific studies of law and law-like systems of rules. The
program is inherently interdisciplinary and multi-methodological.
Successful proposals describe research that advances scientific
theory and understanding of the connections between law or legal
processes and human behavior. Social scientific studies of law
often approach law as dynamic, made in multiple arenas, with the
participation of multiple actors. Fields of study include many
disciplines, and often address problems including though not
limited to:

1. Crime, Violence and Punishment
2. Economic Issues
3. Governance
4. Legal Decisionmaking
5. Legal Mobilization and Conceptions of Justice
6. Litigation and the Legal Profession


LSS provides the following modes of support

1. Standard Research Grants and Grants for Collaborative Research
2. Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants
3. Interdisciplinary Postdoctoral Fellowships
4. Workshop and Conference Proposals

For details: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf12507