Director of Art Therapy Juliet King appointed to professorship in Department of Neurology

Juliet King

Juliet King

Juliet King, assistant professor and director of Art Therapy, has been appointed to an adjunct assistant professorship in the School of Medicine Department of Neurology.

In announcing the groundbreaking joint appointment, Robert M. Pascuzzi, M.D., professor and chair of neurology, wrote “Ms. King’s professional background and current activities relate closely to those of the Department of Neurology and associated departments within the IU Neuroscience Center. As such, a secondary appointment for Ms. King in Neurology will foster collaborative research related to art and the brain with an emphasis on the development of therapeutic strategies for broad application.”

King is a licensed professional counselor and currently serves on the American Art Therapy Associations board of directors. Her current research focuses on helping veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder through Art Therapy.

Her participation in medical student education in a variety of clinical departments at the School of Medicine and IU Health and her work in Indianapolis and surrounding communities to build 30 clinical internship programs for Herron Art Therapy students has built bridges between art and medicine on the IUPUI campus and beyond since the Graduate Art Therapy Program’s inception in 2011.

“The scope of neurological and psychiatric disorders affecting the general population is staggering,” said Dr. Pascuzzi. “Traumatic brain injury represents a common daily challenge for the clinician, be it related to sports concussion, auto accidents, the effects of military combat, epilepsy, stroke, depression or other causes.

“Each of these disorders presents major challenges to patients, families and communities,” he continued. “Currently, each has limited therapeutic options. Thus, it is essential that any opportunity to improve our ability to prevent and manage these common disorders be identified and perfected. Juliet King’s focus on the neuro-scientific basis for art therapy provides our institution with the opportunity to clarify mechanisms for effective art therapy, optimize treatment strategies and clinical applications, establish an optimal educational program for such treatment and, ultimately, improve the outcomes of our patients.”

Popular Combat Paper workshops return to Herron School of Art and Design in November


Paper making at a combat paper workshop Image courtesy of Combat Paper project

This November, Drew Cameron will return to Herron School of Art and Design with his internationally successful Combat Paper workshops, where veterans or anyone touched by war may bring uniforms or other cloth to be turned into paper and then made into works of art.

Established in 2007, the Combat Paper Project has grown from its San Francisco base to an international phenomenon that has helped to heal war-torn people from Canada to Kosovo.

In his own post-combat search for meaning, Cameron, the project’s co-founder, discovered that papermaking could be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.” The workshops are returning to Indiana at the urging of Juliet King, director of Herron School of Art and Design’s Art Therapy Program.

With the support of faculty and students from bookbinding, other fine arts programs and art therapy, the workshops will take place on Thursday and Friday, November 6 and 7, at the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Avenue, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided from noon to 1:30 p.m.

Attendance is free, but reservations are required. Anyone interested in attending the workshops may reserve a seat by contacting Juliet King by email or by phone at 317-278-5466 by October 30.

Cameron also will be providing a lecture series to graduate art therapy students where they will engage in an interactive discussion on the similarities and differences between therapeutic art experiences such as Combat Paper and the clinical profession of art therapy.

Professor Juliet King receives first Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award

Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC and director of Herron School of Art and Design’s Art Therapy Program, is the first to receive the Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award. The newly-created award is the school’s most prestigious and largest faculty research prize.

King will conduct a meta-analysis of art therapy and neuroscience studies to search for patterns and gaps in art therapy research. She expects to present her findings at the American Art Therapy Association national conference in 2014 and for her work to be published. Her research will also benefit Herron art therapy graduate students as she weaves it into the curriculum.

The Springer Family, including Cathy Springer Brown and Rick Brown of Indianapolis and Mary Ann and Scott Hillstrom of the Chicago area, devised the award to inspire Herron faculty members to expand their artistic, creative and scholarly work in innovative directions to yield new insights into the human condition.

The award honors the spirit of Frank C. Springer Jr., a beloved Indianapolis philanthropist and art connoisseur who was a great friend to Herron and many other organizations.

Cathy Springer Brown said “Uncle Frank would be pleased knowing the award will help support important research in the field of art therapy.” She encourages others to think about what their passions might be and explore ways to support Herron. “It’s powerful when you think about the impact your support will have on countless students and faculty,” she said. “Making a gift in honor of someone special makes the experience even more rewarding.”

Herron faculty will competitively submit research proposals for the Springer Award each fall. Herron’s Faculty Affairs Committee, this year led by Professor Eric Nordgulen, will select one proposal for the award annually.