Artist Talk: German artist Bastian Muhr to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

Date: December 2, 2015Bastian Muhr, untitled (detailed), 2014, Pencil/Paper
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Herron School of Art and Degin’s Basile Auditorium

German artist Bastian Muhr, who is know for his large-scale nonrepresentational works, will give a free public talk about his art in Herron School of Art and Design’s Basile Auditorium on Wednesday, December 2 at 6:00 p.m.
Muhr is also active member of an artist-run gallery in Leipzig.

During his two-day visit to Indianapolis, Muhr will do studio visits and have small-group meetings with students from Herron and the IUPUI Museum Studies program.

Muhr first encountered Herron through the school’s study abroad program in Central Europe this past summer. He is one of the artists who met with Herron students during that trip. Herron plans to repeat the Central Europe study in 2016.

Artist Bio:

Bastian Muhr (b.1981 in Braunschweig, Germany) loves to draw. He grew up in Berlin and moved to Leipzig in 2004 to study Painting and Graphic Arts at the Academy of Visual Arts (HGB) where he graduated in 2010. Since then, he has exhibited regularly in Germany and abroad. Upcoming and recent solo exhibitions include: Drawings, Museum Wiesbaden, 2016; and Folge der Linie bis zum Elefanten, Galerie b2 Leipzig, 2014. Muhr’s works are in the collections of Berlin State Museums / Kupferstichkabinett, Berlin; Museum of Fine Arts Leipzig; Dresden State Art Collections/Kunstfonds, Dresden; German Federal Bank, Frankfurt; and Museum Angerlehner, Talheim bei Weis, Austria.

Co-sponsered by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

IUPUI professor offers list of Top 10 favorite museums after visiting 54 in a year

eleew2-webWhether you are a motorcycle fan, a Civil War expert or a honeybee enthusiast, museums offer a place to explore ideas and objects that connect us with the rest of the world, said Elizabeth “Elee” Wood, associate professor of museum studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

“Museums allow us to look back in time and place to see what we’ve been as a society, but more importantly help us know where we might be going,” Wood said. “I love seeing and thinking about the objects that people left behind and what it can mean in our lives today.”

During the 2013-14 school year, Wood visited 54 U.S. museums while on sabbatical. She offers a list of her Top 10 museums as a guide for summer, as well as year-round fun, entertainment and education.

  1. Lower Eastside Tenement Museum, N.Y.-  A museum to help you think about the role of history in our contemporary culture. All tours are guided and promote dialogue and discussion about the life of the thousands of people who lived in the building over time.
  2. Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey, Calif.- Art with fish. This is one of the most breathtaking examples of how a museum can build an emotional connection between visitors and animals. Exhibits highlight the important aspects of animal life and conservation.
  3. Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe, N.M.- The Collective Visions exhibit combines unique examples of folk art traditions from around the world in unusual ways. Wood said she loves the way the displays juxtapose different cultural depictions of life.
  4. Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, Wis.- This is where Wood got her start in the world of museums, working as a youth volunteer in the museum she visited as a child. This museum has some of the best dioramas for both human and natural history.
  5. Kew Gardens, London- Lovers of botanical gardens should put this one at the top of their lists. The museum’s attention to the physical beauty of the plant world is integrated into how staff construct their labels and help you think about why plants matter.
  6. Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn.- Wood said she appreciates how the museum connects visitors with ideas and issues in science. She said she particularly likes the ScienceBuzz blog that features an object of the month.
  7. Cleveland Art Museum, Cleveland, Ohio- The museum’s new Gallery One is a stellar experience, offering new ways to experience artwork both physically and intellectually. For example, a visitor can use facial recognition software to match the expressions on different works of art and in another area, visitors cast their vote on the meaning of different works of art.
  8. National Music Museum, Vermillion, S.D.- Those who like musical instruments of any kind will probably find them here. This museum is crammed full of interesting, strange and unusual instruments from around the world.
  9. Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience and the Nordic Heritage Museum, Seattle, Wash.- Wood said she admires museums that draw on community expertise and experience as their primary focus. Both Wing Luke and the Nordic Heritage Museum have extensive involvement from members of the community.
  10. Indianapolis– “I’m going to cheat a little and say that a trip to Indianapolis will bring you to some of the absolute best museums in the country,” Wood said, referring to the city’s highly respected and award-winning museums. For example, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, the world’s largest, is offering a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity this summer to see the Terracotta Warriors from China; and the Indianapolis Zoo’s new International Orangutan Center will blow you away with outstanding face-to-face interactions with apes. But the city also has so much more to offer: the Indiana History Center, Indiana State Museum, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Conner Prairie Interactive History Park and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, to name a few.

About the Author:
Elizabeth “Elee” Wood is the director of the museum studies program and an associate professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, with joint appointments in the museum studies program, IU School of Liberal Arts and IU School of Education. In addition, she serves as the public scholar of museums, families and learning in a joint appointment at the internationally renowned Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Her book, “The Objects of Experience: Transforming Visitor-Object Encounters in Museums,” co-authored by Kiersten F. Latham and published in 2013 by LeftCoast Press, discusses museum practices that foster the emotional and intellectual connections people have with museum holdings.

To reach Wood for interviews, contact Diane Brown by email or by phone at 317-274-2195

IUPUI Museum Studies program offers “roadshow” on caring for family heirlooms

INDIANAPOLIS — Few people have treasures in the attic that could command top dollar at the “Antique Roadshow.”

But almost everyone has family heirlooms with personal value making them worthy of preservation for future generations.

Why not fold your great-great grandparents’ marriage certificate four times and stuff it into a shoe box? Or how bad is it to hang a 1910 christening gown in the closet inside a plastic dry cleaning bag?

The museum studies program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University, in partnership with the IUPUI Museum Studies Club, is sponsoring a roadshow-type event to offer guidance on such issues.

The IUPUI Museum Studies Collections Care Fair will take place from 1 to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 6 at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, 500 W. Washington St.

The public is invited to bring in beloved heirlooms and meet with a professional conservator for one-on-one conversations on how to better store, care for, and preserve family treasures.  Participants should be able to carry objects into the fair safely. Over-sized objects will be discussed by appointment only. No guns or weapons are permitted.

“This really is a unique opportunity to get one-on-one advice from highly trained museum conservators,” said Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies at IUPUI.

IUPUI museum studies students will work alongside the professionals, Cusack-McVeigh said. The fair will allow the students as emerging museum professionals to share the specialized knowledge they have learned in class.

“This project embodies the museum studies program’s core values by encouraging civic engagement, applied learning, integration, collaboration, inclusion, and leadership,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “Objects carry the experience of meaning for all people everywhere.  Through community-wide events such as this comes a new understanding of this shared legacy and the responsibility that we all have in seeing our history into the future.”

Admission to the fair is free to all. Free parking is also available in the White River State Parking Garage.  Museum admission, required for entrance to museum galleries, is free to IUPUI staff, students and faculty with a Jag Tag.

For appointments, or additional information, contact Holly Cusack-McVeigh at