Even major works of art need dusting, including Chihuly’s masterpiece at IU School of Medicine

dna towerIt rises 19 feet from the atrium floor of one of the busiest laboratory and classroom buildings on the Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis campus. This unique sculpture created by renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly is, well, dusty; it needs cleaning.

The luminous structure composed of more than 1,000 glass spheres in shades of blue, green, mauve and yellow can’t simply be vacuumed or spritzed with window cleaner and buffed with paper towel. The process is more complex, and only one firm in the United States is authorized to handle the maintenance and cleaning of Chihuly’s artwork. These professionals from Denny Park Fine Arts travel the globe delicately and skillfully disassembling, cleaning and reassembling Chihuly’s masterpieces.

Denny Park Fine Arts has been commissioned to clean the IU School of Medicine DNA Tower, modeled after the so-called blueprint for life. They will be working on the project June 1 and 2 in the Morris Mills Atrium of the VanNuys Medical Science Building on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The sculpture was installed in 2003 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the IU School of Medicine and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA molecule by IU alumnus James D. Watson and colleague Francis Crick. The DNA Tower was unveiled Sept. 30, 2003, and this will be its first thorough cleaning.

 

Distinguished IU Professor of Medicine to present talk on origins of echocardiography

Wednesday, October 30, 12:00 – 1:00PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, 304

Harvey Feigenbaum, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine, will present a talk titled, “History of Echocardiography: How to introduce something new in medicine.”

Echocardiography as we know it today began at Indiana University School of Medicine in the fall of 1963, exactly 50 years ago. This talk will document how this technology became the world’s leading cardiovascular imaging tool.

Dr Feigenbaum joined the faculty of the Indiana School of Medicine in 1962, working in electrophysiology and then cardiac catheterization and hemodynamics, but he is best recognized as the “Father of Echocardiography” for pioneering the use of cardiac ultrasound in the early 1960s. He trained most of the early researchers, held numerous echocardiographic courses and workshops, and wrote the first textbook which is now in its 7th edition. A founder of the American Society of Echocardiography, Dr. Feigenbaum served as its first president and was the first editor of its journal for 20 years.

For more information, see the flyer here.

Presented by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IU Student History of Medicine Organization, adn the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program.

Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu