RESEARCH NOTICE| NEA Art Works & Challenge America – Limited Submission

Internal Campus Deadline: 1/20/2016Indiana University-logo

Art Works – NEA Feb deadline
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3692
NEA Application Deadline: 2/18/2016


Art Works – NEA July deadline

http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3693
NEA Application Deadline: 7/14/2016

Challenge America Fast-Track
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3694
NEA Application Deadline: 4/14/2016

For Complete Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

ARTWORKS Brief Description:

The guiding principle of “Art Works” is at the center of everything we do at the NEA. “Art Works” refers to three things: the works of art themselves, the ways art works on audiences, and the fact that art is work for the artists and arts professionals who make up the field. Art works by enhancing the value of individuals and communities, by connecting us to each other and to something greater than ourselves, and by empowering creativity and innovation in our society and economy. The arts exist for beauty itself, but they also are an inexhaustible source of meaning and inspiration. The NEA welcomes projects that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  •  Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other advances in the field.

See the website to determine a specific discipline’s deadline (Feb or July).

ARTWORKS Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

CHALLENGE AMERICA Brief Description:

The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development. This category encourages and supports the following objective:

  • Engagement: Engaging the public with diverse and excellent art. CHALLENGE AMERICA Award Amount:
  • All Fast-Track grants are for $10,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Grants generally are smaller in scope and shorter in duration than other projects supported under these guidelines. It is anticipated that most projects – including planning and close-out time – will be substantially shorter.

Limitation: One per Campus

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2017 Art Works guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One each for a parent organization that comprises separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana, WFIU and WTIU.
  • One from each campus as the lead for a distinctly different project.

This shared limitation of one per campus applies to L0406 Challenge America Fast-Track (4/14/2016 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 2/18/2016 and 7/14/2016 deadlines).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: NEA Notice of Intent.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) listing the discipline of interest at the top.
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery, IU Art Museum partner to showcase Morton Bradley’s math-inspired art

NDIANAPOLIS — With their brilliant colors and their display of the Harvard University graduate’s understanding of science, Morton C. Bradley’s sculptures are full of life. When viewed, the mathematically inspired creations evoke words such as “crystal,” “kaleidoscope,” “prism” and “snowflake.”

The Cultural Arts Gallery at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in partnership with the Indiana University Art Museum in Bloomington, invites the IUPUI campus community and the public to view an upcoming exhibit of Bradley’s work.

“Color and Form: Selected Works by Morton C. Bradley Jr.” opens Monday, Jan. 7, and runs through Friday, Jan. 25, at the IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery in Suite 240 of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Nine of Bradley’s hanging sculptures and 11 sculptures mounted on pedestals will be on display.

Morton C. “Bob” Bradley, born in 1912, was the visionary behind the geometric sculptures that were created over decades by a workshop of talented artists and engineers. Bradley bequeathed the creations to Indiana University at his death in 2004.

“Bob Bradley’s works represent a complex combination of geometry and color theory,” said Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art at IU Bloomington. “He started simply but grew to love the more complex forms of the stellated dodecahedra and the icosahedra as he worked with his fabricators to create sculptures. Toward the end of his life, he began to experiment with minimal surface sculptures that are delightful to the eye and challenging to the viewer.”

Bradley’s first art pieces were paintings and drawings that were unrelated to the sculptures. His work evolved into an exploration of the Platonic solids and progressed to other polyhedrons, with his designs progressing over the years.

Much of Bradley’s inspiration came from traditional two-dimensional patterns from around the world, such as Italian cathedrals and Egyptian and Arabic architecture and textiles. His transformation of the two-dimensional patterns onto multiple intersecting planes resulted in the three-dimensional forms.

Bradley worked as a painting conservator at the Fogg Museum at Harvard and wrote “The Treatment of Pictures,” the 1950 book that remains a historic reference for painting conservators. He was also a researcher and theorist on subjects such as sentence structure, teaching methodology for foreign languages, anthropometry and music theory.

“Morton Bradley was a quiet genius whose accomplishments as an artist deal with great universal ideas,” said Heidi Gealt, director of the IU Art Museum. “It is a genuine pleasure to share Mr. Bradley’s beautiful legacy with Cultural Arts Galley patrons.”

Exhibit activities include a lecture and book signing featuring Lynn Gamwell, a leading author on the intersection of art, mathematics and science. Gamwell is the author of “Color and Form: The Geometric Sculptures of Morton C. Bradley, Jr.,” recently published by IU Press. Gamwell put Bradley’s unique fusion of color, form and mathematical ideas in its historical context in her earlier book, “Exploring the Invisible: Art, Science, and the Spiritual.”

Gamwell’s lecture will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22, in Room 450A of the IUPUI Campus Center. The book signing precedes the lecture, from 3 to 4 p.m., in the Barnes & Noble on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center.

“Color and Form,” a traveling exhibit previously on view at Indiana University Northwest, is made possible through IU’s Moveable Feast of the Arts Initiative, supported by the Lilly Endowment.

The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free.

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5888/IUPUI-Cultural-Arts-Gallery-IU-Art-Museum-partner-to-showcase-Morton-Bradleys-mathinspired-art