Frederick Douglass scholars, IUPUI to celebrate publication of Douglass’ ‘The Heroic Slave’

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Frederick Douglass

INDIANAPOLIS — University scholars from the U.S. and Europe will gather at an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis event next month celebrating a new publication of an “underappreciated gem” – a novel authored by famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

The Frederick Douglass Papers Edition, a documentary editing project of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will host the conference, “Frederick Douglass’s ‘The Heroic Slave’ and the American Revolutionary Tradition” on Oct. 9 and 10. The conference takes place in conjunction with the Second Annual Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Public Lecture.

The two-day event will observe and assess the significance of the Frederick Douglass Papers’ publication of the first scholarly edition of “The Heroic Slave” by Douglass (1818-95), a runaway slave who became an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist and diplomat.

“I am very excited that the forthcoming symposium will generate public attention for this underappreciated gem in early African American literature,” said John R. Kaufman-McKivigan, editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers. “Douglass’ achievements as an orator, autobiographer and political leader are well-remembered but not his important accomplishment as a fiction writer.”

“The Heroic Slave” was inspired by the actions of Madison Washington, a cook on a ship sailing to New Orleans. Washington led an 1841 slave rebellion on a ship that then sailed instead to the Bahamas, allowing 128 slaves to find freedom.

The Douglass Papers’ publication of the book received funding as part of a $52,060 grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Conference presenters will provide special insights and tools to educators to help them better explain Douglass’ life and times to their modern-day students, Kaufman-McKivigan said.

The Oct. 9 conference sessions will take place at The Tower, 850 W. Michigan St., on the IUPUI campus. The Oct. 10 sessions, along with the Second Annual Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Public Lecture and Workshop, will meet at the Jewel Center, 3333 N. Illinois St.

Robert S. Levine, professor of English at the University of Maryland, will deliver the Oct. 9 keynote address, “Heroic Slaves: Madison Washington and ‘My Bondage and My Freedom,’” from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at The Tower.

V.P. Franklin, chair and professor of history and education at University of California Riverside, and editor of the Journal of African American History, will deliver the second conference keynote address, “The Power to Define: History, Scholarship, and Social Change,” from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Oct. 10 at Jewel Center.

Symposium sponsors include the IU School of Liberal Arts, the IUPUI departments of English and history, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Indiana Humanities and the Africana Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Additional conference details, including a complete syllabus, bios of speakers and online registration, are available on the conference website. For additional information, email douglass@iupui.edu.

Culp, Snell earn Fulbright awards

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Amanda Snell of the School of Liberal Arts | PHOTO COURTESY OF IU COMMUNICATIONS

Brian Culp will spend time in Montreal and Amanda Snell in Laatzen, Germany this school year. And despite the fact that Culp is a faculty member and Snell a student, both are helping build IUPUI’s growing role as an international campus.

Culp is a kinesiology expert from the School of Physical Education and Tourism Management. Snell is an English major from the School of Liberal Arts, and both are prime examples of the impact of the internationally focused Fulbright Scholar Program of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

Culp will work with Fulbright Canada partners to examine programs and policies in hopes of improving health and physical activity among youth and other under-represented populations in Montreal, Quebec.

Snell, meanwhile, will be part of an English Teaching Assistant Program in Germany and will teach English and Spanish classes at a high school in Laatzen.

Culp, who earned an American Fulbright Scholar Award, be a visiting research chair in The Person and Society at Concordia University in Montreal, studying social justice promotion in health and physical activity in Montreal, a “City of Design” as designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Recipients of Fulbright grants are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership potential.

“Amanda Snell’s recognition as a Fulbright awardee demonstrates the impact of IUPUI’s commitment to global engagement,” said Nasser Paydar, IUPUI executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “Our students increasingly participate in international experiences during their time at IUPUI and are empowered to transform our community and the world after graduating.”

Culp believes he was chosen for his background in several national and international initiatives in addition to assisting with the design of needed programs and policies, and hopes to provide a Hoosier flavor to the international effort.

“Cities in America are becoming more diverse by the day,” Culp added. That creates both opportunities and challenges. “And cities like Montreal already resemble what Indianapolis could look like in 20 years. We would be remiss if we didn’t prepare to meet the needs of our communities from a health, social and economic standpoint.”

Like Culp, Snell’s work in Europe will connect back to her Indiana roots.

She’ll be part of a partnership in which German students learning English will email Indiana high school students studying German. Additionally, she’ll be doing community literacy projects, including working with immigrant adults trying to learn German.

She credited her IUPUI professors for her upcoming role as a Fulbright awardee.

“I am so grateful for my professors in the IUPUI English department, who mentored me inside and outside the classroom by challenging me academically and encouraging me to apply what I am learning in class to impact the community, in my case, through teaching immigrant and refugee language learners,” she said. “These professors have modeled what I strive to provide to my students: high expectations coupled with support and respect for learners.”

Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and 8th Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference

Nuetzel_Daniel_2010 June 6 and 7, 2014

 IUPUI Campus Center

 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis

INDIANAPOLIS — International scholars will headline an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis conference, discussing the role of cultural knowledge and intercultural communication as well as the intersection of language and culture in community settings. The conference aims to help university teachers, school teachers and other professionals adapt the latest thinking about the integration of cultural studies into professional and second language learning settings.

The Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference will take place June 6 and 7 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis.

The conference is organized by the International Center for Intercultural Communication, the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and the Max Kade German-American Center in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This year’s conference also celebrates the memory of professor Daniel C. Nützel, who died in April 2013 at the age of 50. Nützel was associate professor of German, the Hoyt-Reichmann Scholar of German-American Studies and director of the Max Kade German-American Center at IUPUI.

“Professor Nützel was a well-respected colleague, teacher and scholar,” said professor Claudia Grossmann, conference co-organizer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center. “He was a proponent of expanding cultural and intercultural competence in communication as an aspect of interest across a range of academic disciplines, and this conference is a fitting part of his legacy.”

The conference focuses on studies of how writers and speakers with various linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds negotiate communication. The conference seeks to bring together current discussions of intercultural competence in language education, rhetoric and discourse research, and application in English and other world language teaching settings.

“Presentations will feature theoretical and empirical investigations of topics along with discussion of practical applications, including classroom practices, writing in business and other professional settings,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures and a conference organizer. “The conference addresses a variety of topics, from the importance of teaching metaphoric meanings as an essential part of developing linguistic proficiency in a second language, to the development of intercultural competence during study abroad or the expressions of ethnicity among German Americans in early-20th-century Indianapolis, to name a few, and highlights cultural contact and language development.”

Plenary talks include:

  • “The Present and Future of Intercultural Rhetoric,” Ulla Connor, IUPUI, and Dwight Atkinson, Purdue University
  • “Metaphor: The Integration of Culture, Cognition, and Communication,” James Lantolf, Pennsylvania State University
  • “The Intercultural Complex and Its Assessment in Healthcare Communication,” Srikant Sarangi, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • “Impacting Teacher Use of Critical Sociocultural Practices in K-12 Classrooms,” Annela Teemant, IUPUI

“The conference was established to further research in intercultural competence, and intercultural rhetoric, and to create collaborations among leading research universities and organizations,” said professor Ulla Connor, conference co-organizer and director of the International Center for Intercultural Communication. “It also is intended to build connections at IUPUI and within Indianapolis and Indiana among those who teach in a broad array of disciplines.”

Researchers and teachers of second/foreign languages as well as scholars in second language acquisition, communication, composition and multicultural education, among others, are encouraged to participate.

For more information or to register, visit the conference website.

 

Fulbright Scholar Program in Europe: UK Grants

Dear Colleague,

I am writing to let you know that the competition for U.S. Fulbright Scholar awards to the United Kingdom is now open. We are soliciting applications for the 2014-15 academic year from all levels of faculty and professionals, including early career.

The largest Fulbright Scholar Program in Europe, the UK now offers 35 Core grants for U.S. faculty and professionals to conduct research, teaching or a combination of the two in a variety of fields. This includes: two grants open in all disciplines at any viable UK institution; two grants under Police Research or Criminal Justice Scholar award; two grants under Northern Ireland Governance and Public Policy award; three Distinguished Chair grants; four Fulbright-Scotland Visiting Professorships. In addition, unique to the program are 20 university-partnership awards at designated host universities.

Of special note could be the seven new awards that have been added to the program for AY 2014-15:

 

Fulbright-Global Shakespeare Center Distinguished Chair

Fulbright-University of Birmingham Distinguished Chair

Fulbright-University of Dundee Award (Art and Design)

Fulbright-Birkbeck College

Fulbright-Durham University

Fulbright-Loughborough University

Fulbright-Regent’s College

 

Below is a list of a sample of the 25 renewed grant opportunities:

 

Fulbright-Durham University at the Institute of Advanced Studies (All Disciplines) (Theme for 2014/15 – Emergence)

Fulbright-Lancaster University (STEM-Science and Technology)

Fulbright-Northern Ireland Governance and Public Policy

Fulbright-Queen’s University Belfast (Anglophone Irish Writing and Literature)

Fulbright-Scotland Visiting Professorship at the Glasgow School of Art (Health and Wellbeing)

Fulbright-Scotland Visiting Professorship, University of Edinburgh, College of Humanities and Social Science

Fulbright-University of the Arts London

 

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and hold a Ph.D. or appropriate professional/terminal degree at the time of application. The application deadline is August 1, 2013. 

For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow the link http://www.cies.org/us_scholars/us_awards/. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars at http://www.cies.org/Webinar/ (including one on the UK), or to join our online community, My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program.

I would greatly appreciate if you could share this opportunity with members of your listservs, newsletters or social media group. For further information about specific awards, please contact Krisztina Miner, Program Officer for the UK, at kminer@iie.org.

Best wishes,

Krisztina Miner, Ph.D.
Program Officer, Europe and Eurasia
Fulbright Scholar Program
Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES)
Institute of International Education (IIE)
1400 K Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20005
Ph: 202-686-8645 | Fax: 202-686-4029
kminer@iie.org | www.iie.org/cies

 

IUPUI lecturer to share insights gained on trip to China with students

When the subject turned to China and globalization in his introductory sociology classes at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, David Strong realized two things: His students wanted to learn more about China, and so did he.

When an opportunity to see China first-hand came along, Strong seized it. The sociology lecturer in the IU School of Liberal Arts applied for and was selected, along with other educators from Indiana colleges and universities, to visit China in May 2012. The trip was designed for faculty members who don’t specialize in issues surrounding China but want to incorporate material about China into their teaching.

The trip was sponsored and financed by the Indiana Consortium for International Programs, the Confucius Institute and IUPUI’s Office of International Affairs.

Strong said the experience, which also included a visit to India, underscored the reasons everyone should keep an eye on China and its future, including intellectual reasons and simple curiosity.

But even if none of those reasons apply, he said there is another consideration for Hoosiers: their jobs.
Strong said he was surprised by the speed of new construction in China and how quickly the country is modernizing itself. “You really can, in some respects, very palpably feel this ancient society sprinting into the 21st century.”

Going to China left him with a more nuanced view that he will share with his students.
Among the impressions he took away:

  • “Intellectually, you know China is a big country, but when you are there you realize how damn big it is. The capital city of Yunnan Province, Kunming, where we visited, is in southwest China. Kunming is considered a smaller, provincial capital in China. Yet the population of Kunming is greater than Los Angeles.”
  • “China is a land of contrasts — where farmers in rural areas still use no more technology than they did 500 years ago to grow rice in a country that has a space program.”
  • “In Beijing, we drove past sophisticated, modern skyscrapers on our way to the Great Wall of China.”
  • “Globalization has had its winners and losers in China. In rural areas, so much of the country seems unaffected.”
  • “As long as central power isn’t challenged, you don’t see or feel the power of the state as nearly as much as I thought you would.”

China has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, Strong said. “But what will be the future for the poorest Chinese?” Whether the well-to-do in China are able to live a peaceful, secure life depends upon the answer to that question, he said.

“I remember coming back after this three-week experience and Indiana seemed so small,” Strong said. “We know only a small percentage of the world’s population is American. But it is one thing to know that and another to see it in such a profound way.”

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5706/IUPUI-lecturer-to-share-insights-gained-on-trip-to-China-with-students