Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

Eligibility:
The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3543

Indiana University launches search for new vice president for research

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A search committee has been formed to identify candidates for 225910_w296the position of Indiana University vice president for research, the university has announced.

Bernice Pescosolido, Distinguished Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, and David B. Burr, associate vice chancellor for research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will co-chair the 18-member committee. The group includes faculty, administrators and students representing IU’s Bloomington, Indianapolis and regional campuses.

The new vice president will succeed Jorge José, who will step down when his five-year appointment ends July 31, 2015. José will serve as Rudy Professor of Physics at IU Bloomington and a member of the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at the IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

To build on the success achieved by José, the committee will conduct an internal search within Indiana University. It will make its recommendations to McRobbie. The university hopes to have a new vice president identified by the time José steps down.

José oversaw an 18 percent increase in federally funded research by Indiana University faculty members in his first four years as vice president for research. The strategic plan for research at IU, the development of which was overseen by his office, helped shape IU’s bicentennial strategic priorities approved by the IU Board of Trustees in December 2014.

He also prioritized efforts to decrease the administrative burden on researchers through increased efficiency, including the implementation of new grants administration software and of an online research compliance review system that greatly reduced turnaround times for research protocols.

Pescosolido, in addition to her Department of Sociology appointment, is director of the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research. Burr is also a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering in the IUPUI School of Engineering and Technology.

The vice president for research works with various university offices, campus leaders and deans to increase and diversify research and creative works at IU, attract external funding and develop public-private partnerships, technology transfer, graduate education and intercampus research opportunities.

In addition to being responsible for research administration and research compliance, the vice president oversees and is responsible for the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at IUPUI.

More information about the search is available online.

Indiana University statement on changes to Religious Freedom Restoration Act

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University expresses its appreciation and support for this clarifying language, which ensures that nothing in the227604_w296will provide legal protection for, or in any way promote or permit, discrimination in any form on the basis of a person’s sexual orientation or their race, color, religion, ancestry, age, national origin, disability, sex, gender identity or military service. We are grateful for the hard work and good intentions of those who have earnestly labored in recent days to address this problem.

Indiana University asks all Hoosiers to remember that religious liberty and equal protection under the law are both cornerstones of our democracy and they should not be in conflict with each other. Our system of government works best when people of good will come together to reconcile their differences and find common ground.

We are pleased that this has happened in this situation, and it is our hope and expectation that this clarification will now allow all Hoosiers to put this matter behind us and work together to promote a better image and indeed a better future for the State of Indiana.

IU voices concerns over state’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, reaffirms commitment to equality

NOTE: Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie has issued the following Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbiestatement about the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was recently signed into law in Indiana.

“The recent passage of the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act has brought significant negative attention to the state of Indiana throughout the nation and indeed the world, because the law is widely viewed as signaling an unwelcoming and discriminatory atmosphere in our state.

“While Indiana University hopes that the controversy of the past few days will move the state government to reconsider this unnecessary legislation, the damage already done to Indiana’s reputation is such that all public officials and public institutions in our state need to reaffirm our absolute commitment to the Hoosier values of fair treatment and non-discrimination.

“For its part, Indiana University remains steadfast in our longstanding commitment to value and respect the benefits of a diverse society. It is a fundamental core value of our culture at Indiana University and one that we cherish. Indeed, in 2014 the trustees of Indiana University reaffirmed our commitment to the achievement of equal opportunity within the university.

“To that end, Indiana University will recruit, hire, promote, educate and provide services to persons without regard to their age, race, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, marital status, national origin, religion, sexual orientation or veteran status. Equally importantly, we will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of any of these same factors.

“These are not merely words written in a policy and soon forgotten. These are core values by which every member of the Indiana University community is expected to treat his or her fellow colleagues, students and visitors.

“I want to reassure the entire Indiana University community, including our students, faculty, staff and alumni, that each and every one of you is welcome and appreciated for the unique qualities that you bring to our community. We are all better as a result of our shared experiences, as different as those experiences in life may have been.”

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development)
Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences
Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadline: December 3rd, 2014 5 p.m. http://research.iu.edu/funding_collaborative.shtml.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

SNAAP at IU presenting unique conference on arts training and the creative workforce

Who are the 3 million arts graduates in America? What do we know about them? What is the state of arts training in higher education today?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project — a project of the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research in collaboration with the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University — is organizing a one-of-a-kind three-day national conference on arts training and the creative workforce.

The event, “3 Million Stories: Understanding the Lives and Careers of America’s Arts Graduates,” will take place March 7 to 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

The diverse group of speakers will include:

  • Lewis Black (MFA 1977, Yale School of Drama), Grammy Award-winning comedian, author, playwright, social critic and actor who will be interviewed by Academy Award-winning playwright and lyricist Willie Reale.
  • Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of “The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City” (Princeton University Press, 2007), which has received attention in publications such as the Economist, Time, Forbes, The New Yorker, the Village Voice, National Public Radio and The New York Times.
  • Douglas Dempster, dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin and advocate of accountability in higher education.
  • James Heartfield, British journalist and author of numerous acclaimed publications, including The Creativity Gap.
  • Samuel Hoi, president of Otis College of Art and Design and chair of the board of United States Artists.
  • Sunil Iyengar, director of the Office of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Ann Markusen, author of numerous publications on the arts and director of the Arts Economy Initiative and the Project on Regional and Industrial Economics at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
  • Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, authors of the path-breaking book “Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People.”
  • R. Keith Sawyer, author of 12 books, including “Group Genius” and “Explaining Creativity,” and over 80 scientific articles.

According to Steven J. Tepper, associate director of the Curb Center for Art, Public Policy and Enterprise at Vanderbilt and the conference organizer, “The conference should be required attendance for anyone who is involved in arts training and supporting artistic careers; it will also have much to offer artists, researchers and others who share a broad interest in the 21st-century creative workforce.”

Registration is now open at www.3millionstories.com. The deadline for discounted hotel accommodation is Feb. 1.

Support for this event comes from the Surdna Foundation through its leadership grant for SNAAP.

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project investigates the educational experiences and career paths of arts graduates nationally via an annual survey, and provides findings to educators, policymakers and the general public.

IU to offer free Information Visualization MOOC designed to illustrate data

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 10, 2013

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University’s Katy Börner, the Victor H. Yngve Professor of Information Science at the School of Library and Information Science and an international leader in information visualization, will offer a free massive open online course on the topic beginning Jan. 22.

Börner is curator of the internationally traveled Places & Space: Mapping Science exhibit and author of the Atlas of Science: Visualizing What We Know, published in 2010 by The MIT Press. She specializes in the study of the structure and evolution of scientific disciplines, the analysis and visualization of online activity, and the development of cyberinfrastructures for large-scale scientific collaboration and computation.

The course will run seven weeks from the start date, with a target audience of graduate students able to work three to six hours per week. Anyone interested in generating temporal, geospatial, topical or network analyses and visualizations from either personal or professional data would benefit from the course.

Personal data like bank statements, email activity and friendship networks, or business data like Twitter activity, funding statistics and return-on-investment data, can each provide the information needed to then identify trends, geospatial distributions, topical coverage and previously unrecognized informational links, Börner said.

“The visualization framework I teach and the tools that students will use in the course help answering ‘when,’ ‘where,’ ‘what’ and ‘with whom’ questions,” she said. “The resulting visualizations aim to improve daily decision-making; they are not just eye candy. One goal of the course is to empower a large audience to design insightful visualizations.”

The homepage for the Information Visualization MOOC offers an introductory video, a course schedule, biographies of Börner and the other instructors, and a registration link. Everybody who registers gains free access to the Scholarly Database (26 million paper, patent and grant records) and the Sci2 Tool (100-plus algorithms and tools).

It is one of the first MOOCs offered by IU and the first to offer an opportunity for students to work in teams with actual clients like researchers interested in understanding data patterns and trends, government agencies developing visual interfaces for data holdings, industry representatives looking to maximize return on investment, medical doctors seeking cures, and not-for-profit organizations hoping to communicate impacts and achievements.

“Data mining and visualization skills are best acquired by working on projects that make a difference,” Börner argues. “To be successful, students must care about and understand a client’s needs, become intimately familiar with the data available to address this need, and apply the best algorithms and tools to design effective workflows that render data into insight.”

Information visualization continues to broaden its reach from computer science and human-computer interaction into fields like drug discovery, financial analysis and scientific research. Later this month, Börner will attend the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, to give a talk titled “Visualizing What We Know” using a 26-foot-wide display wall. She will also speak on the topic “Dangerous Visualizations: Big Data Is Watching You” as part of a panel session on “Reinforcing Critical Infrastructure With Cyber Experts.”

For more information or to speak with Börner, please contact Steve Chaplin, IU Communications, at 812-856-1896 or stjchap@iu.edu.

$1,000 IU Alumni Association Scholarships Available for 33 Students

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Alumni Association will award 33 $1,000 scholarships this year through the IUAA Scholars program. Children of IUAA members are eligible for the awards.

The IU Alumni Association is proud to be able to offer support to the children of IUAA members,” said Debbie Lemon, deputy executive director of the IU Alumni Association.

Eligible students can obtain a 2013 scholarship application online. Applications will be accepted through March 29, and scholarship recipients will be notified by May 10.

To be eligible for one of the 33 scholarships, an applicant must be a son or daughter of an IU Alumni Association member and be a full-time, undergraduate student attending any IU campus.

In its 19 years, the IUAA Scholars program has provided $344,000 of support to IU students. “Through the loyalty of our alumni, this program will continue to grow,” Lemon said.

The scholarships will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement as determined by the Office of Student Enrollment Services. Preference will be given to students who have not received a scholarship in prior years.

Two scholarships are designated for qualifying students from each of IU’s eight campuses. The remaining scholarships will be awarded to students on an at-large basis. If there are no applicants from a particular campus, or the applicants do not meet the criteria, that campus’ scholarship will be added to the at-large scholarship pool.

Revenue from the IU Collegiate License Plate Program funds this scholarship program. In 2012, more than 48,000 plates were issued, making the IU plate the most popular specialty plate in Indiana.

To check on the status of your membership or to join the IU Alumni Association, contact Joan Hall, director of membership, at 800-824-3044.

The IU Alumni Association is dedicated to serving the university and its diverse alumni, students and friends. As one of the nation’s largest alumni organizations, serving more than 570,000 graduates worldwide, the IUAA provides many programs and services to its members, nonmember alumni and the university. For more information, call 800-824-3044.