Tag Archive for humanities

Former ACLS President to discuss nature of philanthropy

stan katz
Thursday, April 17, 2014; 12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
Sigma Theta Tau Boardroom at Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, 550 W. North St., Indianapolis, IN

Free and open to the public.

Dr. Stanley Katz, President Emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, and National Humanities Medal Recipient (2010), will deliver a talk entitled “Philanthropy and Plutocracy: Is Bill Gates Different than Andrew Carnegie?”

Katz is President Emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, the national humanities organization in the United States. Mr. Katz graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1955 with a major in English History and Literature. He was trained in British and American history at Harvard (PhD, 1961), where he also attended Law School in 1969-70. His recent research focuses upon the relationship of civil society and constitutionalism to democracy, and upon the relationship of the United States to the international human rights regime. He is the Editor in Chief of the recently published Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History, and the Editor of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the United States Supreme Court. He also writes about higher education policy, and publishes a blog for the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Formerly Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University, Katz is a specialist on American legal and constitutional history, and on philanthropy and non-profit institutions. The author and editor of numerous books and articles, Mr. Katz has served as President of the Organization of American Historians and the American Society for Legal History and as Vice President of the Research Division of the American Historical Association. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Newberry Library and numerous other institutions. Katz is a member of the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the American Antiquarian Society, the American Philosophical Society; a Fellow of the American Society for Legal History, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Society of American Historians; and a Corresponding Member of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Please RSVP to nbell@iupui.edu

For further details, please visit the event page at the School of Philanthropy’s website.

Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching workshops

hilt logo

The Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute will be held August 4-8, 2014 on the campus of the University of Maryland. We’ve got an exciting slate of classes taught by incredible instructors. Courses for 2014 include:

  • Project Development led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
  • Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
  • Humanities Programming led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
  • Games in the Humanities Classroom led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
  • Large-Scale Text Analysis with R led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
  • Network Analysis and Visualization led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
  • Born-Digital Forensics led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
  • Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
  • Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland

The costs to attend HILT are: Non-student/Regular: $950 Student: $500 Group discounts are available by contacting dhinstitute@umd.edu

The Keynote Speaker for Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 will be Tara McPherson. Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. For more information on the Humanities Intensive  Learning and Teaching Institute, please visit the HILT website.

NEH summer stipends – limited submission

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IU Internal Deadline: 6/16/2014

NEH Proposal Deadline: 9/30/2014

Limited Submission website.

Brief Description:

From NEH website: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH’s Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans’ understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest. In connection with a focus on civic discourse, projects might explore the role of women in America’s civic life as well as the civic role of women in other cultures and regions of the world.

Award Amount:

Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:

· Only individual applicants are eligible to apply for Summer Stipends.

· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.

· Individuals who have held or been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. See Program details.

· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.

· See Program details for more specific information.

Limitation:

INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACULTY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS

Only two faculty members teaching full-time at colleges and universities may be nominated by their institutions (campus) to apply for a Summer Stipend.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:

· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;

· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure

· emeritus faculty; and

· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

IUPUI: For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by June 16, 2014 for internal competition.

1. Provide a 1-2 page summary that includes the following: (limitation does not include references)

· Project Title

· Project Director Name and Credentials

· Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.

· Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.

· Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:

· Current and Past Positions

· Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations

· Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.

· Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations

· Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop

IU Logo
Thursday March 13, 2014
1:00 – 1:30 p.m.
UL 2120

The IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, Faculty Appointments and Advancement, invites you to attend the Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop.

Academics must provide evidence to demonstrate the impact and outcomes of their scholarly work. This hands-on workshop, facilitated by reference librarians, will help faculty explore various forms of documentary evidence to support their case for excellence. In addition, strategies for finding appropriate evidence and examples of effective documentation will be provided. If you haven’t already done so, you can register for this workshop by visiting the Academic Affairs webiste. Attendance is limited.

Prior to the workshop, attendees must set up Google Scholar and Researcher ID profiles. Links to each of these sites follow: Google Scholar, Researcher ID, and instructions for Google Scholar are attached for your reference.

We look forward to your interest and participation.

2014-2015 Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowships in the Humanities

photo harry ransom center

The Harry Ransom Center, an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, annually awards over 50 fellowships to support projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The fellowships support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history.

The fellowships range from one to three months, with stipends of $3,000 per month. Also available are $1,200 to $1,700 travel stipends and dissertation fellowships with a $1,500 stipend.

The Ransom Center is currently accepting fellowship applications for the 2014-2015 academic year. Applications must be submitted through the Center’s website by January 31, 2014, 5 p.m. CST.

More details about the fellowships and the Ransom Center’s collections are available online at its website. Questions about the fellowships should be directed to ransomfellowships@utexas.edu.

IUPUI University Library joins with community partners to share perspectives on Muslim culture

photo edward curtis
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI University Library

Faculty, students and community members are invited to “Muslim Journeys, Human Journeys,” an exploration of the people, places, histories, beliefs and cultures of Muslims in the U.S. and beyond. IU School of Liberal Arts professor Edward Curtis will speak about key themes from a series of books highlighted by a current program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The NEH’s “Muslim Journeys” program engages the power of the humanities to promote understanding of and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures and perspectives within the United States and abroad. Through the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, NEH and the American Library Association are providing a collection of 25 books, three documentary films, a one-year subscription to Oxford Islamic Studies Online, and a DVD of short films titled “Islamic Art Spots” to a variety of libraries across the country, including University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Curtis is Millennium Chair of the School of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at IUPUI. He is the author or editor of several books, including Muslims in America: A short history, which was named one of the best 100 books of 2009 by Publishers Weekly. A former NEH Fellow at the National Humanities Center, Curtis has been awarded Carnegie, Fulbright and Mellon fellowships. He is also a founding co-editor of the Journal of Africana Religions.

The Ivy Tech Community College library and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation are co-sponsoring this event with the IUPUI University Library. Parking will be provided for community guests in the North Street garage at the corner of Michigan and Blake streets.

Newberry Library Long-Term Fellowships 2014-2015

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Deadline: December 1, 2013

The Newberry’s fellowships support humanities research in residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago. Its collection is wide-ranging, rich, and sometimes eccentric. Some of the resources offered at the Newberry are a lively interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and scholars; and an array of scholarly and public programs. All applicants are strongly encouraged to examine the Newberry’s online catalog before applying.

For more information, visit the Fellowship website.

These fellowships support research and writing by post-doctoral scholars. The purpose is to support fellows as they develop or complete larger-scale studies which draw on our collections, and also to nourish intellectual exchange among fellows and the Library community. Fellowship terms range from four to twelve months with stipends of up to $50,400.

Roundtable on the Civic Function of the Arts and Humanities

cahi logo
Monday, November 18, 2013
5:00 p.m.
University Club, Indiana Memorial Union

Featuring IUB Provost Lauren Robel, Professor Sara Guyer (Wisconsin), and Associate Professor Jason Kelley (IUPUI). What does research in the arts and humanities contribute to civic life in our society? The release of the AAAS Report of the Humanities and Social Sciences this past summer, IUB’s own ongoing reflection for its Strategic Plan, and the active national dialogue about the values and contributions of humanities scholarship and artistic practice—all make this a very timely event. The Roundtable will be structured to allow for generous conversation.

Co-sponsored by the IU College of Arts and Humanities Institute.

Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

CLIR logo photo
About the Program

The Council on Library and Information Resources is now accepting applications for the 2014 Mellon Fellowships. The application deadline is 5:00 p.m. Eastern time on Friday, November 15, 2013.

For further information, visit the CLIR Fellowship application website. (Link to the online application system, eligibility requirements, application contents, and FAQ).

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities or related social sciences in original sources. The purposes of this fellowship program are to:

  • help junior scholars in the humanities and related social science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources
  • enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available
  • encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad, and
  • provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future.

The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships a year. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for periods ranging from 9-12 months. Each fellow will receive an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting a report acceptable to CLIR on the research experience. Thus the maximum award will be $25,000.

Selection Policies

A special committee of scholars in the humanities, archivists, and special-collections librarians will select fellowship recipients.

The committee aims to select representatives from different fields of the humanities and related social sciences consistent with quality in the research proposals. The committee will assess quality with reference to the following criteria:

  • originality and creativity of the research proposal
  • importance of the proposed dissertation to the applicant’s field
  • appropriateness of the primary-source collection(s) and institutions in which the applicant proposes to do research
  • competence of the applicant for proposed research as indicated by references, transcripts, language skills, research experience, and other academic achievements
  • prospects for completing specified research within the time projected and funds awarded (not all dissertation work need necessarily be done within the fellowship period).

Traditional proposals for original source research in such fields as history will be welcome. But the committee will give preference to sound non-traditional projects in all eligible fields such as those that—

  • use newly available or little studied sources
  • make interdisciplinary use of sources
  • use sources in innovative, creative ways
  • use sources in repositories that cannot, themselves, provide financial assistance to researchers.

Fellows may propose to work in more than one repository during the fellowship period, including repositories abroad. Preference is given to applicants working away from their home institutions. The selection committee will assess the applicant’s need for working in multiple repositories, working abroad, or both.

For purposes of this program, eligible fields of the humanities and related elements of the social sciences include the following (this is not an exhaustive list; if you have questions about your eligibility, please contact us at mellon@clir.org).

  • anthropology
  • archaeology
  • area studies
  • art history
  • classics
  • comparative literature
  • critical theory
  • cultural studies
  • drama, dance or theater
  • economic history
  • ethnic studies
  • history
  • history and philosophy of mathematics
  • history and philosophy of science and medicine
  • language and cultural linguistics
  • literature in any language
  • music history
  • musicology
  • philosophy
  • political theory
  • religion (exclusive of theological training for the ministry)
  • rhetoric
  • sociology
  • women’s studies
  • interdisciplinary studies involving fields above

Lecture: Rachel Armstrong: “The Technology of Nature”

Rachel Armstrong

October 30
Indianapolis Museum of Art
DeBoest Lecture Hall
7-8pm
Co-sponsored by the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Tickets are free to the public. Please order using the form below. 

Rachel Armstrong is Co-Director of AVATAR (Advanced Virtual and Technological Architectural Research) in Architecture & Synthetic Biology at The School of Architecture & Construction, University of Greenwich, London. Senior TED Fellow, and Visiting Research Assistant at the Centre for Fundamental Living Technology, Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark. Rachel is a sustainability innovator who investigates a new approach to building materials called ‘living architecture,’ that suggests it is possible for our buildings to share some of the properties of living systems. She works collaboratively across disciplines to build and develop prototypes that embody her approach.

Dr. Armstrong designs sustainable solutions for the built and natural environment using advanced new technologies such as, Synthetic Biology – the engineering of living systems – and smart chemistry. Her research prompts a reevaluation of how we think about our homes and cities and raises questions about the urban environment of the future. She creates open innovation platforms for academia and industry to address environmental challenges such as carbon capture & recycling, smart ‘living’ materials and sustainable design.

Her award winning research underpins her bold approach to the way that she challenges perceptions, presumptions and established principles related to scientific concepts and the building blocks of life and society. She embodies and promotes new transferrable ways of thinking ‘outside of the box’ and enables others to also develop innovative environmental solutions.