Notre Dame historian and professor to discuss ‘The Bible Then and Now’ in public talk

INDIANAPOLIS — Noted historian and National Endowment for the Humanities medal recipient Mark Noll will deliver a public talk Thursday, Aug. 7, as part of the IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture’s The Bible and American Life Conference.

Noll will present “The Bible Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. Registration is not required for this keynote talk, which is open to the entire Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus as well as the general public.

Noll is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. His numerous books include “The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith” (InterVarsity Press, 2009); “God and Race in American Politics: A Short History” (Princeton University Press, 2008); and “The Civil War as a Theological Crisis” (University of North Carolina Press, 2006). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; in 2006 he received the National Endowment for the Humanities medal at a White House ceremony.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture is part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The Bible and American Life Conference, taking place Wednesday through Friday at Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, is the second stage of a project that seeks to provide the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Earlier this year, the center released the first part of the project: a report based on a national survey of American Bible reading. Among its many findings, the study discovered:

•    There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture in the past year and those who did not.

•    Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.

•    Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.

•    The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

•    Bible readers consult scripture for personal prayer and devotion three times more to learn about culture war issues such as abortion, homosexuality, war or poverty.
A conference schedule and registration information are available online.

Fellowship Opportunities at the Huntington

huntington logoHuntington Fellowships

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

                                               Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

 The Huntington, an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine, maintains a collection of manuscripts that date from the eleventh century up to the present. This collection includes 7 million manuscripts, 420,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Special collections include those on the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence. Applicants can apply for only a short-term or long-term award during this fellowship cycle. Applicants may also submit an application for a travel grant or exchange fellowship, but they must provide a separate application with distinct cover sheet and project description, as these awards are reviewed by a separate committee.

Huntington Fellowship

The Huntington Fellowships provides doctoral level scholars or graduate students who have reached the dissertation phase $3,000 per month for one to five months between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. The majority of these awards will be given to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library, though there are specialized fellowships available including the Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England; the Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas; the Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering ; the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships; and the Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships
These fellowships provide $50,000 over a nine to twelve month fellowship between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 for U.S. scholars who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain
The Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships provide for a U.S. based scholar who holds a PhD or equivalent or is a doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage travel to England, Scotland, or Wales between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. In addition to research that will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain, the Huntington also offers exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Terms for the exchange fellowships and travel grants are as follows:

1. Linacre College, Oxford – A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2015; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

2. Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall – Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

3. Travel Grants – The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2015, and no later than June 30, 2016.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
This fellowship is for nine to twelve months with a stipend of $50,000 between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. This fellowship will support individuals who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014.

Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art at Yale University offers funding for book illustrations

thPublication Grants (Author)
Sponsored by Yale University, the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA), and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art – U.K., this grant provides up to £3,000GBP annually in order to cover costs which are the responsibility of the author and are personally expended by him/her. Eligible costs include specific photography and the production of images for their publication, acquisition of images, reproduction and copyright costs, or the production of graphics. Funds may not be used to cover publishers’ production costs or personal living expenses, travel, nor the support of research on the part of the applicant. Supported topics must have an historical perspective and pertain to topics in the realm of academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present.

The Paul Mellon Centre, an educational charity, supports scholarly publications, in both printed and online form, within the remit of British art and architectural history, as well as books and catalogs of exhibitions or permanent collections of British fine and decorative arts and architecture. It does not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. It has no discretionary funds outside its stated program. Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2015. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2014.

Authors and Editors of books which have been accepted for publication for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press are not eligible to apply for further support through the Publication Grant (Author) award scheme.

An application made by an author or editor will not disbar their publisher from applying for a Publication Grant (Publisher) for the production costs of the same project.

Click here for more information.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

neh_at_logoNEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations grants provide support for museums, libraries, historic places, and other organizations that produce public programs in the humanities.

Grants support the following formats:

  • exhibitions at museums, libraries, and other venues;
  • interpretations of historic places, sites, or regions; and
  • book/film discussion programs; living history presentations; and other face-to-face programs at libraries, community centers, and other public venues.

NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects might include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.

Planning grants support the early stages of project development, including consultation with scholars, refinement of humanities themes, preliminary design, testing, and audience evaluation.

Program Statistics

In the last five competitions the Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants program received an average of 64 applications. The program made an average of six awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 9 percent.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely from competition to competition, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from publicpgms@neh.gov.

 

Division of Public Programs

Receipt Deadline August 13, 2014 for Projects Beginning April 2015

Questions?

Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

IUPUI researcher to host international conference exploring China’s ancient links to Africa

Ian McIntoshINDIANAPOLIS — Ian McIntosh, associate director of the Confucius Institute in Indianapolis and director of international partnerships at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has been awarded a $17,800 grant from the Confucius Institute Headquarters Division of Sinology and China Studies to host a conference, “Exploring China’s Ancient Links to Africa.”

The conference will take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in October.

It will be attended by some of the world’s leading archaeologists in this field, including Sada Mire, director of antiquities in Somaliland, Felix Chami of Dar es Salaam University, Tanzania, and Qin Dashu of Peking University, China. IUPUI’s strategic partner in China, Sun Yat-sen University, will be represented by two leading archaeologists, professors Zhu Tiequan and Wensuo Liu.

“This conference will help to shed light on this early movement of peoples, especially Chinese navigators and traders, and their relationship with African merchants, especially from the Axumite Empire,” McIntosh said.

An Australian anthropologist, McIntosh is a co-founder of the Past Masters, an international team of heritage specialists, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists. The Past Masters received widespread media attention with their expedition to uncover the significance of medieval African coins from the long-abandoned Swahili settlement of Kilwa discovered in Tanzania on a remote island in northern Australia.

Participants at the conference will speak to connections between China and Africa, as far back as the Han Dynasty in the first century of the Common Era. Chinese coin and pottery finds from along the Red Sea and the Horn of Africa and also in East Africa, dating to the Tang, Song and Yuan Dynasties, will also be discussed.

For more information, contact McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu.

The Center for Digital Scholarship: Preserving the past and preparing for the future

UntitledThe online, digital environment is changing the way scholars communicate, access scholarly resources, and share the products of their research. In recent years, the University Library’s program of digital scholarship has grown so much that we were prompted to formalize our efforts by creating the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center for Digital Scholarship can help faculty, staff, and students navigate this fast-changing environment. The Center will enable faculty to share articles, data, images, learning objects, posters, presentations and working papers with students. In addition, it can be used as a means of engaging students in primary research and knowledge creation.

Much like the library itself, the Center will benefit community members as well as IUPUI faculty, staff and students. The Center functions as an important bridge through which we co-create collections with community organizations, providing access and preserving the stories of many of Central Indiana’s leading cultural institutions.

Engagement with the Indianapolis and Indiana community is one of the core principles of IUPUI, and a significant point in the current draft of the IUPUI Strategic Plan. While the library has been engaging with the community through digital collection creation for over 12 years (the majority of our historical digital collections are physically owned by other cultural heritage institutions, including libraries, historical societies, and community organizations), the Center offers an additional connection to our community partners.

We have the technology and expertise to digitize and provide access to historic collections that would otherwise be accessible only to those able to visit the cultural heritage institutions. We are making Indianapolis history visible to the world. We are also creating trusting relationships in the community that have proved fruitful for ventures outside of digitization.

The Center for Digital Scholarship represents the next chapter in the library’s enduring commitment to technology. We encourage you to take advantage of the Center and all of the resources it has to offer.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway and IUPUI bring racing history to life online

thCAJ85RU0INDIANAPOLIS — In partnership with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), IUPUI University Library brings 100 years of track history to life through a collection of free online audio stories. The short oral histories offer race insights and commentary and are accompanied by photographs of some of the most important moments in the life of the Indianapolis 500.

The oral race summaries expand on a one of a kind digital repository that captures the history of IMS through more than 14,000 images taken from 1879 to 2013. Thanks to grants from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library services and administered by the Indiana State Library, the photographs can be viewed on the IUPUI University Library’s website. Just Google: Digital Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

With the help of Donald Davidson, IMS historian since 1998, the oral histories were created by a 2013 IUPUI graduate, from the school of Informatics, Joe Skibinski. There are currently 66 audio histories and the collection continues to grow. Among the highlights are the 1960 race during which Jim Rathmann edged out Rodger Ward by 12.75 seconds and a flashback to the 2006 showdown when Sam Hornish Jr. pulled alongside Marco Andretti on the front stretch in a sprint to the finish to win by 0.0635 seconds. Some vignettes feature clips of the IMS Radio Network’s broadcast coverage with iconic announcers like Sid Collins and Paul Page.

This online collection allows users from across the world to explore the storied past of the landmark that has put Indianapolis at the epicenter of motorsports history for one hundred years. Visitors to the site can search for a favorite year of Indianapolis 500 racing, a favorite driver or car and more. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection is one of more than 60 online collections created by the IUPUI University Library and its community partners, including Conner Prairie Living History Museum, in nearby Fishers, and the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper. To browse the digital collections, visit the library on the web at www.ulib.iupui.edu.

Located at 755 W. Michigan Avenue in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly one million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Call for nominations: Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award

Deadline: Monday, November 24, 2013 at 5:00 P.M.

The Africana Studies Program and Frederick Douglass Papers at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis invite nominations forthe inaugural Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award, the first of which will be presented at the upcoming Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series that will take place on December 6, 2013. This award is named in honor of the phenomenal Madame C.J. Walker, who is credited with being the first female self-made millionaire in the United States as a result of her creative genius, hard work and ingenuity in creating a hair-care business in Indianapolis, Indiana.

The above programs invite nominations for senior scholars who currently hold the rank of Associate or Full Professor. In particular,  nominations are sought for an individual who has served as a dedicated pioneer and innovative scholar in the fields of History, Black Business History, African or African American Entrepreneurship, Business and Marketing, Sociology, Women’s Studies, African Studies, African American Studies, Anthropology, or other related disciplines.

According the Call for Nominations: “We seek to honor a scholar who has served as an intellectual front-runner and scholar extraordinaire in uncovering the contributions, historical narratives, and real world experiences of African or African American entrepreneurs as they created various products and services to enhance the economic marketplace and promote economic development in their communities and nations. We seek to honor a scholar who has dedicated his/her lifetime to the relentless pursuit of knowledge and all that this embodies to create a large body of research and publications which has been considered by his/her peers to be of the highest quality. We seek scholars who have made indelible impacts on the academy both in terms of the sheer volume of their publications as well as the depth of their research. We seek to honor scholars who have performed original, innovative work to illuminate the historical and contemporary activities, accomplishments, and manifestations of entrepreneurial endeavors in order to demonstrate how it has impacted the survival mechanisms of African or African American entrepreneurs either on the continent of Africa or in the African Diaspora with regard to the promulgation of various principles of self-help and economic self-sufficiency.”

Please, email all letters of nomination along with a resume of the nominee to Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun, the Director of Africana Studies at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis at beshouse@iupui.edu.

 

Lecture: James F. Brooks, “Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest”

Dr. James F. Brooks, Research Fellow, School for Advanced Research
“Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest” 

October 17
IUPUI Campus Center Room 409
7-8pm
Support provided by the IUPUI Department of History

Tickets available for free here: https://jamesbrooks.eventbrite.com

James F. Brooks is an American historian whose work on slavery, captivity and kinship in the Southwest Borderlands has been honored with several major national awards, including he Bancroft Prize, the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize and the Frederick Douglass Prize.  He is former President of the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

An interdisciplinary scholar of the indigenous and colonial past, he has held professorial appointments at the University of Maryland, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Berkeley, as well as fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and in 2000–2001, at the SAR itself. The recipient of more than a dozen national awards for scholarly excellence, his 2002 book Captives & Cousins: Slavery, Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands focused on the traffic in women and children across the region as expressions of intercultural violence and accommodation. He extends these questions most recently through an essay on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Pampas borderlands of Argentina in his co-edited advanced seminar volume Small Worlds: Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory from SAR Press.

 

Lecture: Jon Coleman, “Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, a Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation”

August 29, 7-8pm
CE Yale Pratt Room
Jon Coleman, Professor of History, Notre Dame University
“Here Lies Hugh Glass: A Mountain Man, a Bear, and the Rise of the American Nation”
Support provided by the IUPUI Department of History 

In the summer of 1823, a grizzly bear mauled Hugh Glass. The animal ripped the trapper up, carving huge hunks from his body. Glass’s fellows rushed to his aid and slew the bear, but Glass’s injuries mocked their first aid. The expedition leader arranged for his funeral: two men would stay behind to bury the corpse when it finally stopped gurgling; the rest would move on. Alone in Indian country, the caretakers quickly lost their nerve. They fled, taking Glass’s gun, knife, and ammunition with them. But Glass wouldn’t die. He began crawling toward Fort Kiowa, hundreds of miles to the east, and as his speed picked up, so did his ire. The men who took his gear and left him to rot were going to pay.

Here Lies Hugh Glass springs from this legend. The acclaimed historian Jon T. Coleman delves into the accounts left by Glass’s contemporaries and the mythologizers who used his story to advance their literary and filmmaking careers. A spectacle of grit in the face of overwhelming odds, Glass sold copy and tickets. But he did much more. Through him, the grievances and frustrations of hired hunters in the early American West and the natural world they traversed and explored bled into the narrative of the nation. A marginal player who nonetheless sheds light on the terrifying drama of life on the frontier, Glass endures as a consummate survivor and a complex example of American manhood. Here Lies Hugh Glass, a vivid, often humorous portrait of a young nation and its growing pains, is a Western history like no other.

Reserve your free tickets here: