Five new centers awarded Signature Centers Initiative grants

INDIANAPOLIS — One team of scientists is searching for an innovative repair strategy for human spinal cord and brain injuries. Another is looking for cures for the “wasting away,” imagesexperienced by patients with cancer, congestive heart failure, AIDS and other underlying diseases.

Both are the recipients of a grant from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to establish their research centers as viable units whose work will translate into better understanding of disease and the development of better cures and treatments.

The two groups are among five research center teams awarded development funding in Round 8 of the IUPUI Signature Centers initiative Program.

“This is the eighth year that we have been running this internal grant program, and I congratulate the new centers that have been selected for funding,” Kody Varahramyan, IUPUI vice chancellor for research, said.

“The Signature Centers Initiative has become a key cornerstone of the IUPUI research enterprise, playing an important role in enhancing research and scholarly activity, while fostering the development of research centers that are addressing important national and global needs, and contributing to economic and social well-being,” Varahramyan said.

Two of the five centers selected in the latest round have received Category A (three-year) funding:

Center for Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research, Xiao-Ming Xu, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To understand molecular mechanisms underlying traumatic spinal cord and brain injuries and to develop innovative repair strategies that can be translated to clinical treatments of these diseases in a timely and responsive fashion.

Indiana Center for AIDS Research, Samir Gupta, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To develop internal infrastructure to facilitate novel collaborations among researchers that will lead to improving access to care for all HIV/AIDS patients; and improving retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy especially for racial and sexual minorities.

The other three centers have received Category B (one-year) funding for planning purposes:

Center for Aerial Unmanned Systems Imaging, Dan Johnson, director, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Focus: non-military applications of unmanned aerial systems (drone) technology such as remote imaging for water quality, mosquito habitat mapping, disaster preparation and precision agriculture; and the utilization and analysis of data collected with unmanned aerial systems.

Institute for Product Lifecycle Innovation, Hazim El-Mounayri, director, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. Focus: the promotion and management of product lifecycle practice in advanced manufacturing and life science applications in order for American industries to remain competitive in the global market; to serve as a test bed and vehicle for the rapid implementation of advanced product liability tests, digital manufacturing and designing.

Center for Cachexia Research Innovation and Therapy, Teresa Zimmers, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: U.S. multi-investigator cachexia (involuntary weight loss) research center will support development of interdisciplinary, multi-investigator collaborations through meetings, a research retreat and the development of a regional consortium with Ohio State University; and center will invest in a thematic research program on cardiopulmonary effects in tobacco-associated cancer cachexias.

The IUPUI Signature Centers Initiative fosters the development of centers that are unique to IUPUI and that can lead the way in world-class research and creative activities, and make a difference in the lives of people. The initiative provides each selected center with initial funding for a period of one to three years. The centers are re-evaluated at the end of three years and if approved, receive a five-year designation as an IUPUI Signature Center.

Indiana University researchers awarded grant to study employment behavior of artists

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — With a newly announced grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, two Indiana University researchers will examine key economic issues facing IU Logoartists.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs faculty members Doug Noonan and Joanna Woronkowicz will use data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey and data from crowdfunding websites including Kickstarter and Indiegogo to study these questions:

What was the effect of the Great Recession on the employment of artists and how have they fared during the recovery?
How do crowdfunding campaigns for arts projects differ in their results from similar campaigns for technology and other non-arts projects?

The $15,000 research grant is one of only 19 research projects nationwide funded by the NEA through its Research: Art Works program.

“We want to better understand the role of artists in creating economic value,” Noonan said. “We want to develop data that shows the impact of artists on the economic fabric of society.”

Tracking employment and salary for artists is difficult because of the nature of their work. They have flexibility in schedules, often hold multiple jobs and can be footloose in regard to where they live and work.

“We know a good deal about artists from data taken at a particular moment in time, but this research goes in a new direction,” Woronkowicz said. “By studying how artists work and move across years and during a sustained and challenging economic period, we can get a much broader understanding of how they survive and how, as a society, we can help them thrive.”

Noonan and Woronkowicz will analyze data from the 2003-14 Current Population Surveys as well as data from Kickstarter and Indiegogo from 2009 to 2014.

“We hope to create data sets that other researchers can use to further define the economic contributions of artists,” Noonan said. “They enrich our lives in so many ways, but too little is known about the many ways artists earn a living.”

Noonan is a professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is also research director for the IU Public Policy Institute. Woronkowicz is an assistant professor at SPEA at IU Bloomington.

Competition for 2016-17 Core Fulbright Scholar Program

The competition for the 2016-17 Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is now open. The http://www.cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-programCore Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program sends approximately 800 American scholars and professionals annually to approximately 130 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields. Visit the CIES website for application details.

Below are a few facts to keep in mind:

Grant lengths vary: applicants can propose projects for a period of two to 12 months, as specified in the award description.
Grant benefits vary but generally include travel and living expenses for the awardee and accompanying dependents.
Open to all U.S. citizens (permanent residents are not eligible)
Application deadline: August 3, 2015

The Catalog of Awards is available at http://catalog.cies.org. You may also join the My Fulbright online community for updates and to access helpful resources for applicants.

For more information, visit the CIES website, and contact the Fulbright representative on your campus:

IU Bloomington: Professor Marissa Moorman moorman@indiana.edu
IU Kokomo: Professor Kathy Parkison kparkiso@iuk.edu
IUPUI: Professor Ian McIntosh imcintos@iupui.edu
IU South Bend: Professor Joseph Chaney jchaney@iusb.edu

Congressional Research Grants Applications Available Now

dclogo_300px_400x400The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress. Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $944,208 to support over 436 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is March 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in April.

The Center has allocated $50,000 in 2015 for grants (an increase of $15,000 over 2014) with individual awards capped at $3,500. Stay tuned for news on the application and selection process.

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

Complete information about what kind of research projects are eligible for consideration, what could a Congressional Research Award pay for, application procedures, and how recipients are selected may be found at The Center’s website.

To Apply: Download the Word document — Congressional Research Grant Application — and complete the required entries. You may send the application as a Word or pdf attachment to an e-mail directed to Frank Mackaman at fmackaman@dirksencenter.org. Please insert the following in the Subject Line: “CRG Application [insert your surname].”

Deadline: All proposals must be received no later than March 1, 2015.

Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) Fostering Civil, Political, and Labor Rights in Cuba Applications Now Available

imagesDRL invites organizations to submit SOIs for programs that promote internationally-recognized individual, civil, political, and labor rights – as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international agreements – in Cuba.

The Cuban government fails to respect freedom of speech and the press, restricts internet access, maintains a monopoly on political power and media outlets, circumscribes academic freedom, and maintains some restrictions on the ability of religious groups to meet and worship. The government refuses to recognize non-governmental human rights groups or permit them to function legally. The government continues to prevent workers from forming independent unions and otherwise exercising their labor rights. Common human rights abuses on the island include those involving the abridgement of the right of citizens to participate in their government, including through periodic and genuine elections, as well as the use of government threats, extrajudicial physical violence, intimidation, organized mobs, harassment, and detentions to prevent free expression and peaceful assembly. In addition, the government continues to engage in or permit the following abuses: short-term, arbitrary unlawful detentions and arrests, harsh prison conditions, selective prosecution, and denial of fair trial. Authorities also interfere with privacy, engaging in pervasive monitoring of private communications without legal authority and with impunity.

Award Amount:
Lower: $500,000 – Upper: $2,000,000
Eligibility:
Organizations may form consortia and submit a combined SOI. However, one organization should be designated as the lead applicant.
Limitation: Two per Indiana University
An organization may submit no more than two applications.
IU Internal Deadline: 1/14/2015
DRL Statement on Interest Deadline: 2/5/2015
To apply for IU Internal competition:  For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by January 14, 2015 for internal coordination. It is highly recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

  1. 1-2 page Statement of Interest (limitation does not include references) that includes:
    • A statement of work or synopsis of the program, including a brief statement on how the project will have a demonstrated impact;
    • A concise breakdown explicitly identifying the project’s objectives and the activities and expected results that contribute to each objective; and,
    • A brief description of the applicant(s) that demonstrates applicant(s) expertise and capacity to implement the program and manage a U.S. government award.
  2.  A letter of support from Chair or Dean
  3. Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)

Limited Submission 

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities
Indiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. The objective of this opportunity is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

Exploratory Travel Fellowship funding up to $3,000 is available to support national and international travel for scholars and researchers pursuing new and innovative research or artistic projects in the arts and humanities. The grants will allow travel to museums, libraries, laboratories, art galleries, and cultural sites; travel and participation in conferences, workshops, symposia, and performances; and visits to collaborators. Exploratory travel fellowships prioritize travel that is a crucial element of new projects which are themselves potentially significant to the larger scholarly or creative community.

Travel to present or support work that is already well advanced is not eligible for support; travel to give short conference presentations of exploratory work, or to participate in conferences that have limited impact in the field have low priority for New Frontiers. Because overall New Frontiers funding is limited, multiple fellowships for the same project are not possible, and funding is not available for projects that have already been supported through other New Frontiers programs. For the same reason, faculty members are limited to one Exploratory Travel Fellowship award every 18 months (calculated from the submission deadline of the most recent award).

Deadline: February 15 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal Grant (IAHI) Applications Available Now

iahi-logo-2-mediumThe IAHI Grant Program exists to support campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity, and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The three funding programs are:

  • Category A (up to $15,000). This program is designed to enhance research projects conducted by arts and humanities faculty. It allows for things such as up to one month of salary, release time, research assistant support or conference or workshop participation. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match by the faculty member’s department, center or school.
  • Category B (up to $5,000). This is a travel and research support grant that covers travel, equipment, materials, etc. and does not require a match.
  • Category C (up to $30,000). This is a collaborative research grant to support projects conducted by a teams of two or three faculty from different units on campus. May be used for release time, summer salary, research assistant support, etc. This does not require a match.

Deadline: February 15, 2015 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application

NEH Creates New “Public Scholar” Grant Program Supporting Popular Scholarly Books in the Humanities

thThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced a new grant opportunity that encourages the publication of nonfiction books that apply serious humanities scholarship to subjects of general interest and appeal.

The new NEH Public Scholar awards support well-researched books in the humanities conceived and written to reach a broad readership. Books supported through this program might present a narrative history, tell the stories of important individuals, analyze significant texts, provide a synthesis of ideas, revive interest in a neglected subject, or examine the latest thinking on a topic. Most importantly, they should open up important and appealing subjects for wider audiences by presenting significant humanities topics in a way that is accessible to general readers.

“At the Endowment we take very seriously the idea, expressed in our founding legislation, that the humanities belong to all the people of the United States,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams.  “In announcing the new Public Scholar program we hope to challenge humanities scholars to think creatively about how specialized research can benefit a wider public.”

The NEH Public Scholar program represents a long-term commitment at NEH to encourage scholarship in the humanities for general audiences. The grant program forms part of a new agency-wide initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The Public Scholar program is open to both independent scholars and individuals affiliated with scholarly institutions. It offers a stipend of $4,200 per month for a period of six to twelve months. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a twelve-month period. Applicants must have previously published a book or monograph with a university or commercial press, or articles and essays that reach a wide readership.

Application guidelines and a list of F.A.Q.’s for the Public Scholar program are available online at www.neh.gov. The application deadline for the first cycle of Public Scholar grants is March 3, 2015.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Media Contacts: Paula Wasley at (202) 606-8424 or pwasley@neh.gov

Indiana Humanities & Indiana Landmarks Grant Workshop Opportunities

indexindexa;dfjIndiana Humanities & Indiana Landmarks invite you to a Grant Workshop on Dec. 5, 2014, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The workshop will be held at Indiana Landmarks, 1201 Central Avenue, Indianapolis.

Focusing on opportunities for funding public programs in history, preservation, literature and related fields, the workshop will provide information on available grants, offer examples of innovative projects and give you a chance to meet grants officers and colleagues. Senior program officer Chrissy Cortina will talk about grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Advance registration is required. More information at: www.indianahumanities.org/Grants or contact Nancy Conner, 800.675.8897 or nconner@indianahumanities.org.

Overseas Conference Fund Grant Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University, through the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA), administers several internal grant awards each year and also advises IU faculty members on other selected external grants.

Overseas conference grants provide support for faculty to participate in an international conference. Open to all IU faculty, for travel expenses for participation in an international conference. The faculty member must be presenting a paper, participating in a poster session, be a panel member, or giving a keynote speech. Applicants must be full-time academic appointees at an IU campus. Applications must have matching commitment with IU institutional funds, e.g., from department, school, or campus. Conferences held in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and Mexico are excluded. The maximum award is $1,500.

Deadline: January 12 (SLA Internal Deadline January 5), 5 pm

Address inquiries to: iagrants@iu.edu

Guidelines and Application