Upcoming Grant Deadlines for New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities

IU Limestone SymbolThe IU Vice President for Research invites  proposals for the 2014-15 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grants program. The objective of the New Frontiers program is to help faculty members from all Indiana University campuses by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly or creative activity in the arts and humanities.

In 2014–2015 there will be four funding programs:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship grants of up to $50,000 to assist in the development of innovative works of scholarship or creative activity (deadline October 15, 2014).

New Frontiers Experimentation grants of up to $15,000 to fund the very preliminary stages of new trajectories in research or creative activity (deadline January 15, 2015 and June 15, 2015).

New Frontiers/New Currents grants of to $20,000 to fund workshops, symposia, or small conferences with major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest (deadlines February 2, 2015 and August 1, 2015).

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships of up to $3,000 to support national and international travel for faculty pursuing new and innovative research projects (deadlines October 15, December 15, February 15, April 15).

The full Request for Proposals, with further information about each of these programs, is available on-line at: http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml

All proposals must be submitted electronically, via the online application form at the address above.

If you have questions about the New Frontiers program, please review the RFP and the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml, or contact Faith Kirkham Hawkins, Chief of Staff to the Vice President for Research (fhawkins@iu.edu).

If you would like help preparing your proposal or if are looking for collaborators, please feel free to contact the Director of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, Jason M. Kelly, at iahi@iupui.edu

Funding Opportunities for Research Commercialization and Economic Success (FORCES)

imagesThe FORCES program is designed to support IUPUI researchers in the successful transformation of their research findings into commercially viable outcomes. The key goals of FORCES are to support: 1) realization of short-term projects that will enhance commercial value of IUPUI intellectual property assets, by facilitating commercialization of inventions, technologies, or other intellectual property derived from existing research projects, and 2) development of research initiatives that show great promise for commercialization of the research outcomes. The next RTR application deadline is September 15, 2014For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://research.iupui.edu/funding/.

Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER)

imagesThe Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER) has been developed to support IUPUI faculty who are historically underrepresented and/or excluded populations in their discipline or area of scholarship and historically denied admission to higher education or that discipline, 1) to become successful in sponsored research and scholarly activity, and 2) to achieve significant professional growth and advancement. The program sustains mentorship opportunities through the EMPOWER Grant Program, supporting achievement of excellence in research and scholarly activity, and optimal attainment of academic career goals and objectives. The next EMPOWER application deadline is September 5, 2014. For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://res! earch.iupui.edu/funding/.

NEH Challenge Grants

NEH LogoNEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.
Award Amount:
NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $75,000 to $500,000. Requests for more than $500,000 are unlikely to be funded at that level. Note that the program encourages requests for smaller grants for sharply defined purposes.
 
Fund-raising:
NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered. HBCUs, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and two-year colleges, however, are required to raise only two times the federal amount.
Eligibility:
With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.
 
Limitation:  One per campus  
Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by October 1, 2014 for internal competition.
·         1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.
·         A Letter from the Chair or Dean
·         2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI
NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

IU Internal Deadline: 10/1/2014

Preliminary Draft Deadline: 3/24/2015
Prospective applicants who wish to submit a preliminary draft proposal should do so four to six weeks before the application deadline.
NEH Proposal Deadline: 5/5/2015
Brief Description:
NOTE UPDATED INTERNAL DEADLINE: The NEH Program Officer indicated that selected applicants should begin raising required matches as early as December.
Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

NSF Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

NationalScienceFoundationIU Internal Deadline: 11/12/2014
NSF Proposal Deadline: 2/17/2015
Brief Description:
Accepts proposals for innovative research projects to foster ethical STEM research in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.
Proposed research should seek to provide answers to the following: What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?’ Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or membership in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility or humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a culture of academic integrity? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, or integrated into other research and learning settings?
Successful proposals will include a comparative dimension, either 1) between or within institutional settings that differ along the factors suggested or other factors, or 2) Institutional Transformation (IT) awards, where the comparison is over time– before and after an intervention. For IT, investigators are expected to gather and report baseline data in the first annual report. (See the reporting section of this solicitation for additional reporting requirements for both types of awards).
Award Amount:
·         The anticipated funding amount each year is $3,050,000 for an estimated 6-8 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 5 years.
·         Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.
·         Cost Sharing Requirements: Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
Eligibility:
NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy.
Limitation: One per University
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 12, 2014 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.
·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean
·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)
IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Learning Environments Grant

ctlThrough the awarding of small grants, the Learning Environments Grant (LEG) supports the creation of innovative, engaging formal and informal learning environments that meet the needs of both faculty and students.

Proposals will be ranked on the following criterion:

1. The project must have a demonstrable positive impact on learning
2. The number of students who will benefit
3. The project must enable new/critical academic experiences for faculty and/or students
4. The creativity of projects
5. The project provides opportunities for faculty-student/student-student interaction
6. Availability of any additional needed funds
7. Plans/funds should be in place for repairs and maintenance of all items purchased

*Areas renovated within the past 10 years are not eligible to receive this grant.

Submission:

Should you have any questions about the online submission process please call the Center for Teaching and Learning at (317) 274-1300 or email thectl@iupui.edu. Proposals are due Friday, October 17

Past Projects

2013–2014

  • Classroom Furniture – ES 2104 ($12,416)
  • Classroom Furniture – BS 2006 ($12,416)
  • Building the Flipped Classroom: Designing a Collaborative Workspace for Active Learning - ET 329 ($25,000)
  • School of Education Multipurpose Learning Spaces – ES First Floor ($25,000)
  • I-Learn (Informatics – Learn, Engage, Apply, Reflect, Network): A Collaborative Space for Informatics – IT 592 ($25,000)
  • Creating a small class/meeting/study room for the Economics graduate programs – CA 536A ($8,700)

2012–2013

  • Leadership Learning Lab: Enhancing Technology for Collaborative Teaching and Learning / ET 327OLS ($22,389)
  • Geography Learning Lab and Seminar Room / CA 209 Renovation ($24,939)
  • Renovation for Laboratory Classes / SL 008 ($25,109)
  • Engaging the World Through the Global Crossroads Classroom / ES 2132 ($25,000)
  • Designing Spaces for Project and Problem Based Learning for Art Education and Community Arts Programs / Herron 147 and 151 ($23,240)
  • Cavanaugh Hall Classroom Furniture / CA 215 ($24,696)

2011–2012

  • Classroom Furniture – LD 002 ($12,519.12)
  • Classroom Furniture – LD 004 ($12,190.72)
  • Scale Up Classroom in Psychology ($25,000)
  • Literacy Studies (Cavanaugh 347/349) ($25,000)
  • “PhyLS” – A Physics Learning Space ($13,939.83)
  • Taking 2110 into the 21st Century ($25,000)
  • Creating a technology-enhanced collaborative learning space for IUPUC Students ($25,000)
  • Musculoskeletal Learning Lab (PE0005) $15,895.08)

2010–2011

  • Classroom Furniture – ET 302, 304 ($25,000)
  • Classroom Furniture – ET 308 ($10,470.68)
  • SHRS Student Learning and Research Facilitation Lab ($24,991.50)
  • ES 2101 Classroom redesign and technology upgrade ($25,000)
  • CSL & OSE Enhanced Learning Space – BS 2010A ($25,000)
  • Cavanaugh 435 – An environment for global and civically engaged learning ($25,000)

2009–2010 Projects

  • PETM Multipurpose Learning Lab ($21,700)
  • Biology Resource Center ($25,000)
  • University Library International Newsroom ($25,000)
  • E&T Student Council ($16,212.45)
  • Spanish Resource Center ($19,000)
  • Informatics MARLA Lab ($25,000)

2008–2009 Projects

  • Psychology Resource Center ($20,875)
  • University Library International Newsroom/University Library Reference Area ($20,000)
  • School of Liberal Arts and Science Multipurpose/Performance Auditorium ($25,000)
  • Community Learning Network/Union Building Learning Spaces ($22,000)
  • New furnishings for room BS 3006 ($23,315)
  • New furnishings for room LD020 ($18,333)

Eligibility

Schools and departments at IUPUI and IUPUC are eligible for the LEG.  Registered student groups may also apply.

Full details can be found here

Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET)

IU LogoThe Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET) and the Mack Center for Inquiry on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning are pleased to announce a partnership that will offer travel grants to faculty presenting SoTL work at a conference.

Applications for funding of faculty travel to conferences, as presenters, will be evaluated and awards made twice a year. Grants are for allowable costs as delineated by IU Travel Management up to $750. Faculty are encouraged to combine this funding with other sources.

The fall application deadline is July 1st for travel that will be completed by the following January. The spring application deadline is December 1st for travel that will be completed before the start of the next academic school year.

Please visit the website for more information on the application process https://facet.indiana.edu/events-programs/travel-grants.shtml

New Frontiers grants in the Arts and Humanities awarded to IU faculty

Thirty-two faculty members from six IU campuses have been awarded grants for their projects in arts and humanities through Indiana University’s 2013-14 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.

In 2014, New Frontiers enters its 10th year of supporting IU faculty in the arts and humanities. Initially funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc. starting in 2004, funding for New Frontiers was continued by IU President Michael A. McRobbie in 2010. The program is overseen and administered by IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Over the past 10 years, the New Frontiers program has awarded funding to more than 680 IU faculty members. In the current round, funded projects include solo art installations, photography exhibitions, electronic music compositions, a book-length manuscript on painting in the 21st century and a symposium on the intersection between intellectual property and the arts.

“We’re very pleased to be able to continue to fund such a rich array of arts and humanities projects,” Vice President for Research Jorge José said. “The New Frontiers program is a unique opportunity for our faculty members, and we are very appreciative of President McRobbie’s commitment to supporting outstanding scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities.”

Currently, the New Frontiers program offers three types of grants: major awards of up to $50,000 (New Frontiers); smaller awards of up to $20,000 for workshops, symposia or small conferences (New Currents); and fellowships of up to $3,000 to support faculty travel (Exploratory Travel Fellowships).

The 2013-14 New Frontiers grant recipients are:
New Frontiers Grants
  • Blane De St. Croix, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “‘Dead Ice’ Production/Exhibition”
  • Jennifer Fleissner, English, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Maladies of the Will: Literature as a Symptomatology of Modernity”
  • Laura Foster, gender studies, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law, Benefit Sharing and Identity in Southern Africa”
  • John Gibson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “In Flight: a Composition for Chorus and Electronics”
  • Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Digital Scholarly Companion to ‘In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen’
  • Jeffrey Hass, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Contemporary Dance-Based Multimedia Work With Original Computer Music”
  • Susan Hyatt, anthropology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Between the National and the Local: The British Community Development Projects and the Creation of New Knowledge”
  • Herbert Timothy Lovelace, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “The World Is On Our Side: The Black Freedom Movement and the U.S. Origins of the U.N. Race Convention”
  • Robert Meyer-Lee, English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, IU South Bend: “Valuing Middle English Literature Across the Divide: Literary Value in Chaucer, Langland, Audelay and Lydgate”
  • Osamu Nakagawa, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “Memorial: Tracing the Past”
  • Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Rethinking Painting in the 21st Century”
  • Meredith Setser, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Agricultura Aesthetics”
  • Erich Holt Stem, music, School of Arts and Letters, IU Southeast: “America By: A Symphony Tour”
  • Eva White, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Who Is Irish? Roddy Doyle’s Hyphenated Identities”
  • Jeffrey Wolin, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, and Andrew Lumsdaine, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington: “The Art of Plenoptics: A Collaboration”
New Currents Grants
  • Konstantin Dierks, history, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Symposium: Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861”
  • Mark David Janis, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “Intellectual Property and the Performing Arts Symposium”
  • John Kaufman-McKivigan, history, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Frederick Douglass’s The Heroic Slave and the American Revolutionary Tradition: A Scholarly Symposium”
Exploratory Travel Fellowships
  • Julie Belz, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Re-conceptualizing Intercultural Communicative Competence”
  • Dennis Bingham, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Bob Fosse and the Revisionist Film Musical”
  • Matthew Bradley, political science, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Politics and Motivating the Next Generation of Public Servants”
  • Alisa Clapp-Intyre, English, IU East: “Reclaiming Children’s Voices: British Children’s Nineteenth-Century Diaries”
  • Melissa Dinverno, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Rewriting Lorca: Modernism, Publication, Folklore and (Trans)nationalisms in 1920-1930s Spain”
  • David Dzubay, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “New Work for Berlin Piano Percussion”
  • Amit Hagar, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Thou Shalt Not Commute: A Finitist Outlook on Probability in Statistical Physics”
  • Chu He, English, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “Narrating Trauma in Jennifer Johnston’s ‘O Ananias, Azarias, and Miseal’ and Mary Beckett’s ‘A Belfast Woman’”
  • Elizabeth Lloyd, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Regional Climate Models, ‘Value Added,’ and ‘Model Robustness’”
  • Micheline Nilsen, history, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920-1975”
  • Kathleen O’Connell, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Illustration Master Class 2014 at Amherst College”
  • Margaret Ryznar, McKinney School of Law, IUPUI: “The Ethics and Philosophy of Child Support as a Human Right”
  • Marietta Simpson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Mosaic Melodies of the Diaspora”
  • Estella Vieira, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Female Figures in Fernando Pessoa”

Kress Foundation invites applications for scholarly European art projects

History of Art Grants Program
  • Supports scholarly projects that will enhance the understanding and appreciation of European art and architecture.
  • Grants are awarded to non-profit institutions with 501(c) 3 status, based in the United States, including supporting foundations of European institutions.
  • These are competitive grants. Please see ‘Past Grants’ and ‘Annual Reports’ for past awards and typical levels of funding and review our Grants FAQs for answers to common application questions.
  • In addition to submitting printed materials, applicants must include a CD containing a complete set of the application materials. The materials on the CD must be presented as a single PDF document.
  • Application Deadlines*: January 15, April 1, and October 1

The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.

Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.

For full application guidelines, visit the Kress Foundation website.

Huntington Library Research Fellowships 2014-15

Fellowships at The Huntington 2014-2015

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present and include seven million manuscripts, 413,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Within the general fields listed above there are many areas of special strength, including: Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

The Huntington will award to scholars over 150 fellowships for the academic year 2014-2015. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life.

Application deadline for all fellowships: Nov. 15, 2013.

Huntington Fellowships

Short-Term Awards
Long-Term Awards
Dibner History of Science Program

 

For full fellowship and grant program details and deadlines, including application procedure and submission guidelines, visit The Huntington’s website.

Short-Term Awards
Huntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

  • Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
  • Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
  • Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
  • Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
  • Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
  • Molina Fellowships in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.

The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Linacre College, Oxford

Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall

Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Travel Grants

Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2014, and no later than June 30, 2015.

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship

Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.

Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).

Amount of award: $5,500.

Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Dr. Gerald Cloud at gwcloud@humnet.ucla.edu.

Long-Term Awards
Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships

Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections and must have received their PhD between 2009 and 2011.

Mellon Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dibner Program in the History of Science

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library and to work in the other resources for the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

Short-Term Awards

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

Long-Term Awards

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants can be conducting research or already be at the writing stage and need reference materials only.