2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation

Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate IU School of Education, IUPUI

Nate William

Please join us for the 2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation, hosted by the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME), and the School of Education. You will have the opportunity to experience a series of innovative research presentations by Ph.D. students, colleagues and community members. Join us for creative yet critical conversations on research that’s relevant to today’s society.  We thank all of those who attended our last sessions and look forward to seeing you at this one. Please mark this time on your calendar in support of our students and colleagues.

Invited Presenter: Mr. Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate, IU School of Education, IUPUI

Racial disparities in school discipline: A function of Systemic Racism?

The primary focus of my research centers on the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline, in particular, the exploration of how, if at all, the “school-to-prison pipeline” acts a function of systemic racism. Specifically, my research draws from critical scholarship to examine how teachers’ and administrators’ dispositions, their biases and beliefs, and philosophies of education and discipline, intersect with macro level social systems to contribute or interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline and/or act as means of protecting whiteness. Using an embedded multi-case study (Yin, 2013) of four middle schools differing on dimensions of disproportionality and school locale, I analyze isolated and intersections of subunits of inquiry using a conceptual framework comprised of color-blind racism, post-colonialism, and critical race theory . Subunits of this inquiry include classroom dynamics, the disposition of teachers, their philosophies of education and discipline, discipline techniques, the referral process, and the overall discipline policy. Working in combination with my conceptual framework I will examine the subunits of this inquiry from three data points 1) ethnographic observations, 2) interviews, and 3) school level referral rates.

Central Indiana Community Foundation helps Herron’s art therapy program produce a skilled and in-demand workforce

UntitledJob placement is 100 percent for the first cohort of eight graduate students who earned a master’s degree in Art Therapy from Herron School of Art and Design this May, said Juliet King, program director and professor of Art Therapy. Launched only two years ago, the program has developed vigorously, in large part due to philanthropic support from individuals and foundations.

The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, put its support into bringing together Herron students—who must complete 1,000 hours of supervised, clinical training as part of their degrees requirements—and community members who can benefit from art therapy services.

Herron’s Art Therapy program is one of only 34 two-year, full-time, residential programs in the country—offering graduate art therapy education in preparation for the dual credentials of Registered Art Therapist and Licensed Mental Health Counselor.

Herron currently is working with nearly 30 community organizations to pair its art therapy students with programs that serve youths, adults, the aged and other vulnerable populations. Qualified professionals must supervise Herron’s students in a clinical setting. That requires investment.

Andrew Black, a grants officer of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, said “The Art Therapy grant was in alignment with The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund because it promotes the making of art and provides important health and social services to improve the physical, mental and emotional well-being of people of all ages, many of whom are dealing with significant physical and/or mental health challenges.”

Frank began work at Eli Lilly and Company in 1937. He and his wife, Irving, became incredibly generous philanthropists. Both are now deceased, but their fund, established in 1998, will continue in perpetuity as they wished.

King said, “It’s exciting to see the full cycle of the impact of the program. We are helping children and adults cope with illness, injury and trauma while the graduate students gain the academic experience necessary to become a trained professional and contribute to the workforce of Indiana and beyond.” She added, “We are grateful to the Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund and CICF for the assistance in successfully developing the program.”

The program’s first eight graduates are Linda Adeniyi, Uriah Graham, Amy Granger, Katherine Hearn, Amanda Krieger, Heidi Moffat, Hillary Timmerman and Natalie Wallace. These alumni were hired by providers including Adult & Child Community Mental Health, MENTOR Network, Midtown Community Mental Health, Season’s Hospice, Legacy House, Meridian Health Services and Gallaudet University that provide school- and home-based counseling, health therapy and hospice care.

Nine students are projected to graduate in 2015 and 13 in 2016.

Black added, “Not only does this therapy provide counselors, therapists, or case workers with an additional and often times necessary alternative method for communication, it also provides some of our most vulnerable populations with a creative outlet that promotes self-expression, increases their ability to cope with their circumstances or challenges, and ultimately aids in their rehabilitative progress and contributes to their quality of life.”

To learn more about supporting Herron’s Art Therapy Program, contact Kim Hodges, Office of Development, by email or by phone at 317-278-9472.