IUPUI is a three-peat winner: Campus receives award for exemplary diversity initiatives

Insight Into Diversity Magazine Honors IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — For the third year in a row, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis was selected to receive the 2014 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from Insight Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education.

As a recipient of this national award that honors U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, IUPUI will be prominently featured in the magazine’s November 2014 issue.

“We are pleased to be recognized for all of the energy that has been built into distinct cultures, which has created and instilled diversity into our institution’s consciousness through practices and programs designed for all members of the IUPUI community,” said Karen Dace, IUPUI’s vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion. “While we know there is still much work still ahead of us, we have opened more doors of opportunity for our students, faculty, staff and community partners.”

Insight Into Diversity also recognized IUPUI for its ability to embrace a broad definition of diversity on campus including gender, race, ethnicity, veterans, people with disabilities and members of the LGBT community. IUPUI was commended for making strides in the enrollment and graduation of minority students and for putting in place some distinctive diversity initiatives and inclusion programs. Highlights of the recognition include:

Diversity Enrichment and Achievement Program: Assists students of color in pursuing and obtaining their college degrees through an intensive retention program that addresses personal, academic and social experiences that have an impact on student success.

  • Office for Veterans and Military Personnel: Provides comprehensive resources to veterans and Veterans Affairs benefit recipients to aid in their overall success as IUPUI students.
  • Diversity Plans: Outlines goals for improving the climate for diversity in each school and administrative unit across campus.
  • Faculty and Staff Councils: Facilitates interaction, addresses issues and motivates, encourages and promotes the professional development of IUPUI faculty and staff. The Faculty and Staff Councils include Asian American and Pacific Islander; Black; Latino; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender; and Native American.
  • Faculty and Staff Diversity Awards: Recognizes faculty and staff who promote a campus climate where diversity is valued, energizes the appreciation of world cultures or champions for social justice.

“We hope the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity award serves as a way to honor those institutions of higher education that recognize the importance of diversity and inclusion as part of their everyday campus culture,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of Insight Into Diversity magazine.

Other awards

IUPUI was recently ranked as one of the nation’s top universities, as well as ranked No. 7 “Up and Coming” school and “Best College for Veterans” by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 edition of Best Colleges. The campus was also recognized for its learning communities and first-year experience for the 13th consecutive year by U.S. News, which highlighted IUPUI for offering programs that help ensure a positive collegiate experience for new freshmen and undergraduates.

For the second year in a row, Minority Access Inc. — a national nonprofit educational organization dedicated to improving diversity in education, employment and research — has recognized IUPUI for its commitment to diversity as a result of the programs and activities it has on campus that both enhance and promote an environment of inclusion.

Additionally, IUPUI was named among the 30 best non-Historically Black Colleges and Universities for minorities in the United States by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, a critical source of news, information and commentary on the full range of issues concerning diversity in American higher education.

“The Education of Auma Obama,” a film by Branwen Okpako: screening and discussion with filmmaker

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
University Library, Lily Auditorium
755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202

Admission free Reception with light refreshments to follow

Branwen Okpako is a highly talented and successful Nigerian-Welsh documentary filmmaker, who now lives and works in Berlin, Germany, where in 1999 she received a degree in Film Directing from the prestigious German Film and Television Academy in Berlin. Since 1995 she has produced several videos, mixed media installations, and films. Her work has been selected to be shown at film festivals in Europe, Great Britain, Africa, North America, and the Middle East. In addition to her work as a filmmaker, Okpako offers seminars, workshops, and projects in film studies and filmmaking and lectures at universities in the US, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world. Topics of her presentations include: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Otherness in Film; Black Identity in German Cinema; Migration and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Europe; The Art of Filmmaking; The Theory and Practice of Screenplay Writing, to name just a few.

For her 2000/2001 film, Dreckfresser (Dirt for Dinner), Okpako received, among others, the German Next-Generation-First-Steps Award for Best Documentary Film. For her 2002 film, Sehe ich was du nicht siehst? (Do I see what you do not see?), she received the D-motion special prize for the city of Halle, Germany. Her most acclaimed film, The Education of Auma Obama, (Die Geschichte der Auma Obama) has brought Okpako much attention. The film is a captivating and intimate portrait of the U.S. president’s older half-sister, who embodies a post-colonial, feminist identity. Dr. Auma Obama studied German at the University of Heidelberg from 1981 to 1987 before continuing with graduate studies at the University of Bayreuth, earning a PhD in 1996. Her dissertation was on the conception of labor in Germany and its literary reflections. For The Education of Auma Obama, Okpako received the 2012 African Movie Academy Award for Best Diaspora Documentary, the Festival Founders Award for Best Documentary at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles (both in 2012), and the Viewers Choice Award at the Africa International Film Festival (2011).

Her most recent project, Fluch der Medea (The Curse of Medea), a docu-drama about the life of the late German writer Christa Wolf, was shown at the Berlin Film Festival in 2014.

Okpako is currently a visiting professor of German at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. This event is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center, with additional support from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the German Program. For additional information contact: Jason M. Kelly, Director, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, iahi@iupui.edu, (317) 274-1689 Claudia Grossmann, Interim Director, IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center,cgrossma@iupui.edu, (317) 274-3943

Research grant: Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, Duke University

The Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, part of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Bok & Manuscript Library at Duke University, announces the availability of Mary Lily Research Grants for research travel to our collections in Durham, North Carolina.

The Sallie Bingham Center documents the public and private lives of women through a wide variety of published and unpublished sources. Collections of personal papers, family papers, and organizational records complement print sources such as books and periodicals. Particular strengths of the Sallie Bingham Center are feminism in the U.S., women’s prescriptive literature from the 19th & 20th centuries, girls’ literature, zines, artist’s books by women, gender & sexuality, and the history & culture of women in the South.

Mary Lily Research grants are available to any faculty member, graduate or undergraduate student, artist, or independent scholar with a research project requiring the use of materials held by the Sallie Bingham Center. Travel and living expenses while pursuing research at the Rubenstein Library will be reimbursed up to the grant amount after completion of travel. Applicants must live outside of a 100-mile radius from Durham, NC. The maximum award per applicant is $1,000.

The deadline for application is January 31, 2014 by 5:00 PM EST. Recipients will be announced in March 2014.

For more information and to apply, please visit the Bingham Center’s website.

Cuba’s 2013 Venice Biennale representative to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

Artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons will appear at Herron School of Art and Design as the 2013 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecturer.

Her artist’s talk, titled “Global Journey,” is scheduled to take place on December 4 in the Basile Auditorium at 6:00 p.m., the same night the Undergraduate Student Exhibition opens in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries. Both events are free and open to the public.

Inclusion in the juried undergraduate show is an honor for the students whose work is chosen. In a typical year, the jury must select from more than 300 very strong submissions. The exhibition usually contains 60 works across a wide variety of media.

Also opening in the Basile and Marsh Galleries will be two exhibitions from the graduate Collaborative Practices course taught by Professor Andrew Winship and Basile Center Director Kathryn Armstrong.

The three exhibitions continue through December 19.

photo campos-pons

Photo of artist by Ricardo Gay Luger Courtesy of Maria Magdalena studio and Galleries.

Campos-Pons was born in Cuba in 1959. She is a faculty member at the School of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. According to its website, “Her work of the last 20 years covers an extended range of visual language investigations…from the early 1980s focus on painting and the discussion of sexuality in the crossroads of Cuban mixed cultural heritage to incisive questioning, critique and insertion of the black body in the contemporary narratives of the present.” She represented Cuba in the 2013 Venice Biennale.

“Campos-Pons’s work is largely autobiographical but speaks to a much-needed dialogue about history, place and identity. She does this through a contemporary language that also provides universal access to discussing our current socio-political landscape,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Campos-Pons to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” she said. This is the sixth Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum and Judith Shea to Herron.

Lecture: James F. Brooks, “Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest”

Dr. James F. Brooks, Research Fellow, School for Advanced Research
“Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest” 

October 17
IUPUI Campus Center Room 409
7-8pm
Support provided by the IUPUI Department of History

Tickets available for free here: https://jamesbrooks.eventbrite.com

James F. Brooks is an American historian whose work on slavery, captivity and kinship in the Southwest Borderlands has been honored with several major national awards, including he Bancroft Prize, the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize and the Frederick Douglass Prize.  He is former President of the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

An interdisciplinary scholar of the indigenous and colonial past, he has held professorial appointments at the University of Maryland, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Berkeley, as well as fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and in 2000–2001, at the SAR itself. The recipient of more than a dozen national awards for scholarly excellence, his 2002 book Captives & Cousins: Slavery, Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands focused on the traffic in women and children across the region as expressions of intercultural violence and accommodation. He extends these questions most recently through an essay on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Pampas borderlands of Argentina in his co-edited advanced seminar volume Small Worlds: Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory from SAR Press.