NEH Challenge Grants

NEH LogoNEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.
Award Amount:
NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $75,000 to $500,000. Requests for more than $500,000 are unlikely to be funded at that level. Note that the program encourages requests for smaller grants for sharply defined purposes.
 
Fund-raising:
NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered. HBCUs, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and two-year colleges, however, are required to raise only two times the federal amount.
Eligibility:
With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.
 
Limitation:  One per campus  
Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by October 1, 2014 for internal competition.
·         1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.
·         A Letter from the Chair or Dean
·         2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI
NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

IU Internal Deadline: 10/1/2014

Preliminary Draft Deadline: 3/24/2015
Prospective applicants who wish to submit a preliminary draft proposal should do so four to six weeks before the application deadline.
NEH Proposal Deadline: 5/5/2015
Brief Description:
NOTE UPDATED INTERNAL DEADLINE: The NEH Program Officer indicated that selected applicants should begin raising required matches as early as December.
Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Art legends inspire creative miniature golf course for Herron student scholarship fundraiser

unnamed     June 7, 2014

   Indianapolis, IN

 

Andy Warhol’s soup can paintings and Picasso’s bull series are among the inspirations for a nine-hole miniature golf course created for a fundraiser at Herron School of Art and Design on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“The Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art” takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, June 7 on the first floor of the art school building, Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.
Tickets for the evening of miniature golf, food and drinks, along with music and a silent auction, are $35 to $125. The event is open to the general public, and proceeds will help fund scholarships for Herron students.
Reagan Furqueron, director of foundation studies at Herron and faculty coordinator for the Herron Open, is spearheading the construction projects needed to transform Eskenazi Hall classrooms into one of the most creative miniature golf courses Hoosiers will ever play.
Nine student-faculty teams representing  the school’s academic programs — art history, sculpture, foundation studies, art education, print and painting, visual communication design, ceramics, and furniture design — and the school’s alumni association, have each built a hole, clocking in a total of at least 200 hours on the three-month project.
“None of us have ever built a mini golf course, so we have been making up the rules as we have gone along; but as artists, we are pretty well-prepared for that,” Furqueron said. “I gave them two rules to follow: One was that each hole had to be well-made. And the other was that (a hole) had to be playable. Then they could do whatever they wanted to from there.”
The builders played some mini golf around town to get a feel for what should happen along the course. While miniature golf enthusiasts will see some similarities with other courses, there are some creative twists to the Eskenazi course.
“It is a little more dimensional than what you are used to … the (course) at the mall is pretty flat. There are some challenges in this one that are pretty interesting, some tricks,” he said.
Although the event can be seen as a “really great cocktail party with mini-golf,” its value goes beyond entertainment.
“The fundraiser is for student scholarships, which is why many of our faculty wanted to get involved,” Furqueron said. “We know our students give a lot to come to school. All IUPUI students do. And this is a way for us to give back to them.”
The project has provided opportunities for freshmen to collaborate with faculty as peers outside a classroom setting, and it has provided graduate students the opportunity to practice their project management skills. The event also provides the community an opportunity to visit Herron’s first-class facility.
Tickets are available online.