Fellowship Opportunity at Washington College and John Carter Brown Library

Brown University's John Carter Brown Library.  Image taken from www.brown.edu

Brown University’s John Carter Brown Library.

The C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the John Carter Brown Library invite applications for the Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Fellowship, a unique research and writing fellowship. The deadline for applications for the 2015-2016 Hodson-Brown Fellowship is March 15, 2015.

The Hodson Trust – John Carter Brown Fellowship supports academics, independent scholars, writers, filmmakers, novelists and artists working on significant projects relating to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830.

Fellowship award: $20,000 plus housing and university privileges

Duration: two months of research in Providence, RI (any time between September and May) and two months of writing in Chestertown, Md. (any time between May and August)

Residence: In Providence, a private room in the John Carter Brown Library’s Fellows’ Residence; in Chestertown, exclusive occupancy of a restored circa-1735 house.

Work space: In Providence, space in the John Carter Brown Library; in Chestertown, a private office in the circa-1745 waterfront Custom House, home of the Starr Center

Deadline for 2015-2016:March 15, 2015

Further information and criteria:http://hodsonbrown.washcoll.edu

Questions may be directed to:starr_center@washcoll.edu.

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities
Indiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. The objective of this opportunity is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

Exploratory Travel Fellowship funding up to $3,000 is available to support national and international travel for scholars and researchers pursuing new and innovative research or artistic projects in the arts and humanities. The grants will allow travel to museums, libraries, laboratories, art galleries, and cultural sites; travel and participation in conferences, workshops, symposia, and performances; and visits to collaborators. Exploratory travel fellowships prioritize travel that is a crucial element of new projects which are themselves potentially significant to the larger scholarly or creative community.

Travel to present or support work that is already well advanced is not eligible for support; travel to give short conference presentations of exploratory work, or to participate in conferences that have limited impact in the field have low priority for New Frontiers. Because overall New Frontiers funding is limited, multiple fellowships for the same project are not possible, and funding is not available for projects that have already been supported through other New Frontiers programs. For the same reason, faculty members are limited to one Exploratory Travel Fellowship award every 18 months (calculated from the submission deadline of the most recent award).

Deadline: February 15 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal Grant (IAHI) Applications Available Now

iahi-logo-2-mediumThe IAHI Grant Program exists to support campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity, and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The three funding programs are:

  • Category A (up to $15,000). This program is designed to enhance research projects conducted by arts and humanities faculty. It allows for things such as up to one month of salary, release time, research assistant support or conference or workshop participation. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match by the faculty member’s department, center or school.
  • Category B (up to $5,000). This is a travel and research support grant that covers travel, equipment, materials, etc. and does not require a match.
  • Category C (up to $30,000). This is a collaborative research grant to support projects conducted by a teams of two or three faculty from different units on campus. May be used for release time, summer salary, research assistant support, etc. This does not require a match.

Deadline: February 15, 2015 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application

National Endowment for the Humanities Grants Available Now

NEH LogoSustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC): Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting preventive conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections.

SCHC offers two kinds of awards: 1. PLANNING−To help an institution develop and assess preventive conservation strategies, grants will support planning projects, which may encompass such activities as site visits, risk assessments, planning sessions, monitoring, testing, modeling, project-specific research, and preliminary designs for implementation projects. Planning grants must focus on exploring sustainable preventive conservation strategies. 2. IMPLEMENTATION−Projects should be based on planning that has been specific to the needs of the institution and its collections within the context of its local environment. It is not necessary to receive an NEH planning grant to be eligible for an implementation grant. Planning could be supported by NEH, other federal agencies, private foundations, or an institution’s internal funds. Projects that seek to implement preventive conservation measures in sustainable ways are especially encouraged. ! Deadline: December 3, 2014. http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/sustaining-cultural-heritage-collections

Digital Projects for the Public: NEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring humanities ideas alive for people of all ages and all walks of life. The Digital Projects for the Public program supports projects such as websites, mobile applications, games, and virtual environments that significantly contribute to the public’s engagement with humanities ideas. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. Digital Projects for the Public grants support projects that are largely created for digital platforms. While these projects can take many forms, shapes, and size! s, you should apply to this program primarily to create digital projects or the digital components of a larger project. NEH is a national funding agency, so these projects should demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. Projects can have specific targeted audiences (including K-12 students), but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience. Deadline: June 11, 2015. http://www.neh.gov/grants/public/digital-projects-the-public

New Signature Center Initiative Category Announced

The Signature Centers Initiative (SCI) was begun in 2006 in an effort to create strong research units that are uniquely identifiable with IUPUI. The centers were created as an integral part of the Academic Plan for IUPUI, with the goal that they will lead the way in world-class research and creative activities that will substantially enhance IUPUI’s reputation. With these aims in mind, a call for proposals in the Fall of 2006 resulted in a total of 19 center proposals selected for support.  As there was a great deal of interest and enthusiasm for the Signature Centers Initiative, and as the quality of the proposals submitted was very high, in 2007 it was decided to continue the development of Signature Centers across the IUPUI campus. This has resulted in subsequent rounds of calls for proposals.

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research will introduce a new Signature Centers Initiative (SCI) funding category in 2015. This new category is for SCI planning grants that will allow collaborative research groups to build capacity and strengthen a future application for a center grant. The funding level for each approved proposal in this category is expected not to exceed $50,000 for one year.

Note: Proposals for this category require that the applicant has attended the annual SCI workshop, which will take place on January 16, 2015, from 1-3 pm in University Library Room 1126.

For more detailed information on SCI planning grants, please download the SCI guidelines.

IU consortium awards faculty grants for work on ‘Wonder and the Natural World’

The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society has awarded $51,248 to 11 faculty members from three IU campuses to further their research on the topic of “Wonder and the Natural World.”

This grant funding is the first phase of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by the consortium on the theme of “Wonder and the Natural World.” The first phase will culminate in a daylong public symposium in May, at which funding recipients, along with invited guests, will present their works in progress.

“We received a truly impressive array of proposals, linking wonder to many facets of human and nonhuman life,” said IU Bloomington religious studies professor and consortium director Lisa Sideris. “The successful proposals reflect on the light and dark dimensions of wonder, as well as wonder’s ethical, emotional, cognitive, pedagogical, aesthetic and religious forms. It will be exciting to see the conversations that emerge from these diverse studies of wonder.”

The goal of the funding is to encourage faculty to engage with the idea of “wonder” in all its forms and in a variety of disciplines. The awardees cut across academic fields, including faculty in religious studies, English, bioethics and anthropology.

Heather Blair, assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at IU Bloomington, was awarded funding for her project “Super-Natural: Configuring Childhood Virtue in Contemporary Japanese Picture Books.”

“This project examines representations of the natural world in post-war Japanese children’s literature,” she said, “with a particular emphasis on contemporary picture books designed for children ages 3 to 6. Broadly speaking, it aims to introduce the study of Japanese children’s literature into ongoing conversations about childhood, character education, religion and ethics.”

Richard Gunderman, professor and vice chairman of radiology at the IU School of Medicine, will conduct research titled “Medicine: Wonder-less or Wonderful?” He seeks to explore the disconnect between what is taught at medical school, the dispassionate science of treating injury and disease, and the power of wonder for both the patient and the physician.

“Every time a physician sees a patient,” he said, “there is something awesome in bringing hidden things to light and assisting natural healing processes. Birth, death, illness, regeneration — these are the physician’s daily stock and trade, and they are pregnant with mystery.”

Other awardees and their projects include:

  • James Capshew, IU Bloomington Department of History and Philosophy of Science, “Bristlecone Pine: The Construction and Fate of a Scientific Wonder “
  • Edward E. Curtis IV, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Department of Religious Studies, “Elijah Muhammad’s World of Wonders: Astrophysical Disaster, Genetic Engineering, UFOs, White Apocalypse and Black Resurrection in the Nation of Islam”
  • David Haberman, IU Bloomington Department of Religious Studies, “Anthropomorphism without Anthropocentrism: Ritualized Ways of Enhancing the Experience of Wonder With Natural Phenomena in Devotional Hinduism”
  • Kelly E. Hayes, IUPUI Department of Religious Studies, “Intergalactic Space-Time Travelers: The Enchanted World of Brazil’s Valley of the Dawn”
  • Kelcey Parker, IU South Bend Department of English, “Living Nature: Surrealist Landscapes and Dreamscapes”
  • Phaedra C. Pezzullo, IU Bloomington Department of Communication and Culture, “‘Unprecedented, Unthinkable and Horrific’: Filipino Climate Justice Advocacy and The Sea Around Us”
  • Peter Thuesen, IUPUI Department of Religious Studies, “Wonder in the Whirlwind: Tornadoes as an American Sublime”
  • Michael Muehlenbein, IU Bloomington Department of Anthropology, and Vicky Meretsky, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, “Conservation Values, Personality and Motivations for Conserving Primate Populations”

The symposium, May 22, 2015, will provide a space for grantees to present their in-progress work to colleagues and the public. It will be followed in 2016 by an international conference to explore more deeply discussions of wonder and nature begun at the symposium.

About the Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. The consortium’s mandate is to aid in the development of research to better understand religion, ethics, values and spirituality in society. The consortium receives support from the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington, which is dedicated to supporting ongoing faculty research and creative activity, developing new multidisciplinary initiatives and maximizing the potential of faculty to accomplish path-breaking work.

Related Links

IUPUI to host Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase

The IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Indiana University Research and Technology Corp. will host the 2014 IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase: Funding Innovation on Thursday, Nov. 20.

The event will take place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus Center Theater, on the lower level of the center, 420 University Blvd.

The forum will bring together researchers, entrepreneurs, investors and executives from IUPUI and the Indianapolis business community to explore the challenges and opportunities of translating the fruits of academic research into products.

Joseph Trebley, the head of startup support and promotion at the IURTC, will moderate a panel discussion on “Alternatives for Funding New Ventures.” More funding options are available for startup businesses now than ever before. New services have emerged to fill the gap created as banks and conventional venture capital firms have pulled away from riskier early-stage investments.

Panelists are Nick Carter, Kevin Hitchen, Polina Osherov and Jacob Schpok.

Nick Carter, founder of Husk Foods – Carter is a serial entrepreneur – founder of over half a dozen businesses – and is the acting CEO of two startups and an active partner or board member in four other established companies. Born a farm boy, he has a firm understanding of hard work, starting his first business at 16. Carter is the author of “Twelve Seconds,” which teaches entrepreneurs to get their small business off the ground.

Kevin Hitchen, founder of Localstake – Hitchen and his two partners co-founded Localstake to provide growing businesses a new solution for raising capital. Since its launch in 2013, the online investment marketplace for investing in private businesses has been featured in national publications such as TechCrunch, Yahoo Finance and Investopedia. Entrepreneur highlighted Localstake in its Reinvention 2013 article on “Indy’s Innovators.”

Polina Osherov, co-founder of Pattern – Osherov is co-founder of the nonprofit fashion industry networking and advocacy group Pattern and the editor-in-chief of Pattern Magazine, an award-winning, internationally distributed publication about fashion, design and creativity in Central Indiana. She is also a commercial photographer, working with corporate clients, advertising agencies and marketing companies.

Jacob Schpok, executive director for the lieutenant governor’s Office of Small Business and Enterprise – The newly created office was established to ensure Indiana works for entrepreneurs. Under his new role as executive director, Schpok continues to serve as state director of the Indiana Small Business Development Center, which last year helped Indiana businesses raise $70 million in capital and create over 1,600 full-time jobs.

The forum and showcase event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

NEH seminar offers K-12 teachers an opportunity for academic study of Muslim American identities

Edward E. Curtis IV

Edward E. Curtis IV

The academic study of Muslim American history and life is the focus of a summer seminar open to K-12 teachers.

Applications are now being accepted for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present,” to be held July 12 to Aug. 1, 2015, in Indianapolis.

Sixteen teachers from across the country will be selected for the three-week seminar during which they will discuss the racial, ethnic, religious and gender identities of U.S. Muslims.

Directed by Edward E. Curtis IV, an award-winning scholar of Islam in America and holder of the Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the seminar will focus on the academic study of Muslim American identities, not the religious or spiritual beliefs or habits of the participating teachers.

Participants will study 30 primary source documents written by Muslim Americans, listen to distinguished guest lecturers Kambiz Ghanea Bassiri and Juliane Hammer, and visit two local mosques. They will also work on individual research projects on topics such as Muslim American slave narratives, Islamic hip-hop, Muslim American food cultures and Muslim American political engagement.

“My primary aim is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which teachers try to answer a key question of our time: What does it mean to be both Muslim and American?” said Curtis, who is the author of “Muslims in America, among other books.

The seminar will meet almost daily in the Campus Center on the IUPUI campus. In addition to meeting rooms, the IUPUI Campus Center houses a bookstore, a credit union and a food court.

As one of seven campuses administered by Indiana University, IUPUI is known as Indiana’s premier urban research and health sciences campus. IUPUI has more than 30,000 students enrolled in 17 schools, which offer more than 250 degrees. IUPUI awards degrees from both Indiana and Purdue universities. The campus is near the heart of downtown Indianapolis. Several major cultural attractions and affordable restaurants are within walking distance or a brief bus ride.

All seminar participants receive a $2,700 stipend to help cover transportation, food, housing and other costs. Housing is available on campus. Teachers in public and private schools are encouraged to apply.

Funding for the summer seminar comes from the National Endowment for the Humanities, an independent federal agency that supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

Deadline for applications is March 2.

For additional information about the seminar, teachers should address their questions to Edward E. Curtis IV by phone at (317) 278-1683 or email: ecurtis4@iupui.edu

New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowship Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. The objective of this opportunity is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowship provides funding of up to $15,000 is available to support the very initial stages of projects that represent a significant new trajectory for an individual or group of faculty members. Proposed projects may be truly exploratory — leading either to a larger, long-term project or to recognition that the time is not right for such a project. Proposals might include:

  • An artist experimenting with different media or materials
  • A group of faculty from different departments, disciplines, schools or campuses planning a charette: a short, intensive design workshop meant to jumpstart a larger collaborative project
  • A scholar exploring a project in a field that is related to, but outside his or her usual expertise
  • An author experimenting with a different genre
  • A scholar attempting to determine if a particular research project is sustainable

NF Experimentation proposals must make the case that the project being explored is significant both to the field and to the applicant’s development as an artist or scholar, is appropriate for the applicant and represents a reasonable and exciting new direction, and that the project has the potential to be the beginning of a longer-term, large scale project that is likely to secure external support (grant funding, exhibition or performance opportunities, etc.).

Deadline: January 15 (SLA Internal Deadline January 8), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application

Eligibility for all funding programs: All Indiana University tenured and tenure-eligible faculty and those employed at IU but not on the tenure-track, whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity, are eligible to submit proposals. Visiting and adjunct faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

Those who have been awarded funding through the New Frontiers major grant program (now called the New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship program) in 2011-12, 2012-13, or 2013-14 are not eligible for New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship grants and (all other things being equal) will be a lower priority for funding through the New Frontiers Experimentation grant category

Overseas Conference Fund Grant Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University, through the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA), administers several internal grant awards each year and also advises IU faculty members on other selected external grants.

Overseas conference grants provide support for faculty to participate in an international conference. Open to all IU faculty, for travel expenses for participation in an international conference. The faculty member must be presenting a paper, participating in a poster session, be a panel member, or giving a keynote speech. Applicants must be full-time academic appointees at an IU campus. Applications must have matching commitment with IU institutional funds, e.g., from department, school, or campus. Conferences held in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and Mexico are excluded. The maximum award is $1,500.

Deadline: January 12 (SLA Internal Deadline January 5), 5 pm

Address inquiries to: iagrants@iu.edu

Guidelines and Application