Huntington Library Research Fellowships 2014-15

Fellowships at The Huntington 2014-2015

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present and include seven million manuscripts, 413,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Within the general fields listed above there are many areas of special strength, including: Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

The Huntington will award to scholars over 150 fellowships for the academic year 2014-2015. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life.

Application deadline for all fellowships: Nov. 15, 2013.

Huntington Fellowships

Short-Term Awards
Long-Term Awards
Dibner History of Science Program

 

For full fellowship and grant program details and deadlines, including application procedure and submission guidelines, visit The Huntington’s website.

Short-Term Awards
Huntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

  • Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
  • Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
  • Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
  • Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
  • Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
  • Molina Fellowships in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.

The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Linacre College, Oxford

Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall

Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Travel Grants

Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2014, and no later than June 30, 2015.

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship

Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.

Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).

Amount of award: $5,500.

Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Dr. Gerald Cloud at gwcloud@humnet.ucla.edu.

Long-Term Awards
Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships

Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections and must have received their PhD between 2009 and 2011.

Mellon Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dibner Program in the History of Science

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library and to work in the other resources for the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

Short-Term Awards

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

Long-Term Awards

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants can be conducting research or already be at the writing stage and need reference materials only.

ACLS Fellowships including ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowships and ACLS/New York Public Library Fellowships

Fellowship Details

  • Maximum award:
    $65,000 for full Professor and equivalent
    $45,000 for Associate Professor and equivalent
    $35,000 for Assistant Professor and equivalent
  • Tenure: six to twelve consecutive months devoted to full-time research, to be initiated between July 1, 2014 and February 1, 2015
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (ofa.acls.org) no later than 9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, September 26, 2013.
  • Notifications will be sent by late February 2014.

The ACLS Fellowship program invites research applications in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

The ACLS Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. ACLS Fellowships are portable and are tenable at the fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for research. (1) An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate’s current academic year salary. Tenure of the fellowship may begin no earlier than July 1, 2014 and no later than February 1, 2015.

The fellowship stipend is set at three levels based on academic rank: up to $35,000 for Assistant Professor and career equivalent; up to $45,000 for Associate Professor and career equivalent; and up to $65,000 for full Professor and career equivalent. ACLS will determine the level based on the candidate’s rank or career status as of the application deadline date. Approximately 25 fellowships will be available at the Assistant Professor level, approximately 20 at the Associate Professor level, and approximately 20 at the full Professor level.

Institutions and individuals contribute to the ACLS Fellowship Program and its endowment, including The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Council’s college and university Associates, and former Fellows and individual friends of the ACLS. ACLS is fortunate to have special funds available to support research in particular areas:  the Oscar Handlin Fund supports archival research in U.S. history; the Frederic Wakeman Fund aids research in modern Chinese history; and the Donald Munro Fund is dedicated to work that exhibits high quality in sinology and in critical analysis of Chinese philosophical traditions and ethical systems.

Eligibility

  • U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status as of the application deadline date.
  • a Ph.D. degree conferred at least two years before the application deadline. (An established scholar who can demonstrate the equivalent of the Ph.D. in publications and professional experience may also qualify.)
  • a lapse of at least two years between the last “supported research leave” and September 1, 2014, including any such leave to be taken or initiated during the 2013-2014 academic year. Therefore, to be eligible, an individual’s most recent supported research leave must have concluded prior to September 1, 2012. (Supported research leave is defined as the equivalent of one semester or more of time free from teaching or other employment to pursue scholarly research or writing supported by sabbatical pay or other institutional funding, fellowships and grants, or a combination of these. This definition applies to independent scholars as well as those with institutional affiliations.)

Application

Applications must be submitted online and must include:

  • Completed application form
  • Proposal (no more than five pages, double spaced, in Times New Roman 11-point font)
  • Up to two additional pages of images, musical scores, or other similar supporting non-text materials [optional]
  • Bibliography (no more than two pages)
  • Publications list (no more than two pages)
  • Two reference letters

Criteria Used in Judging ACLS Fellowship Applications

Peer reviewers in this program are asked to evaluate all eligible proposals on the following four criteria:

  1. The potential of the project to advance the field of study in which it is proposed and make an original and significant contribution to knowledge.
  2. The quality of the proposal with regard to its methodology, scope, theoretical framework, and grounding in the relevant scholarly literature.
  3. The feasibility of the project and the likelihood that the applicant will execute the work within the proposed timeframe.
  4. The scholarly record and career trajectory of the applicant.

ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowships

In order to encourage humanistic research in area studies, special funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and ACLS has been set aside for ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowships to be designated among the successful applicants to the central ACLS Fellowship competition. Scholars pursuing research and writing on the societies and cultures of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union will be eligible for these special fellowships.

Application must be made to the ACLS Fellowship Program and all requirements and provisions of that program must be met, with the addition that an International and Area Studies Fellow must be either a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident who has lived in the United States continuously for at least three years by the application deadline. These fellows also must submit a final report to both NEH and ACLS. Designation of the ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellows will be made by ACLS.

ACLS/New York Public Library Fellowships

ACLS may give up to five residential fellowships per year in conjunction with the New York Public Library’s Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. The Center for Scholars and Writers provides opportunities for up to 15 Fellows to explore the rich, diverse collections in the NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (formerly the Humanities and Social Sciences Library). The Center also serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas among Fellows, invited guests, the wider academic and cultural communities, and the interested public. It provides individual office space and common areas in the Library building. Fellows are required to be in residence from September 2, 2014 through May 22, 2015 and to participate in Center activities. These may include lunches, panel discussions, public conversations, symposia, and interviews. More information about The New York Public Library and its collections is available at http://www.nypl.org/research-collections.

The stipend for the NYPL residential fellowships will be $65,000. Application for an ACLS/NYPL residential fellowship has the same eligibility requirements, application form, and schedule as the ACLS Fellowship Program, with the additional proviso that these residential fellowships will be granted to scholars whose projects will benefit from research in the NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building.

Please Note: Because this is a joint fellowship, applicants for the ACLS/NYPL residential fellowships must also apply to the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the NYPL. The application for the NYPL competition is available at http://www.nypl.org/csw. The deadline for application and letters of recommendation is September 27, 2013.

An application for an ACLS/NYPL residential fellowship may have any one of the following outcomes:

  1. a fellowship awarded solely by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the NYPL,
  2. an ACLS Fellowship awarded solely by ACLS,
  3. or an NYPL/ACLS residential fellowship awarded jointly by the two organizations.

For more information, see http://www.acls.org/grants/Default.aspx?id=380

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships

Fellowship Details

  • Amount (for stipends): up to $60,000
  • Amount (for project costs): up to $25,000
  • Tenure: one academic year, to be initiated between July 1, 2014 and September 1, 2015
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (ofa.acls.org) no later than 9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, September 26, 2013.
  • Notifications will be sent by early February 2014.

ACLS invites applications for the ninth annual competition for the ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships, thanks to the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating such works.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended to support an academic year dedicated to work on a major scholarly project that takes a digital form. Projects may:

  • Address a consequential scholarly question through new research methods, new ways of representing the knowledge produced by research, or both;
  • Create new digital research resources;
  • Increase the scholarly utility of existing digital resources by developing new means of aggregating, navigating, searching, or analyzing those resources;
  • Propose to analyze and reflect upon the new forms of knowledge creation and representation made possible by the digital transformation of scholarship.

ACLS will award up to six Digital Innovation Fellowships in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of up to $60,000 towards an academic year’s leave and provides for project costs of up to $25,000. ACLS does not support creative works (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translations, or purely pedagogical projects.

This year’s successful applicants may take up the fellowship in 2014-2015 or at any time up to September 1, 2015, with tenure completed by June 30, 2016. Fellowship tenure may be one continuous year, or two semesters taken over two years, but candidates must commit themselves firmly to their preferred timeframe on their completed applications.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended as salary replacement and may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay up to an amount equal to the candidate’s current academic year salary.

Given the nature of the program, proposals need to explicitly state the means and tools (software, applications, interfaces) to be used to accomplish the project’s goals. Furthermore, a project plan and budget are required. These fellowships also include provision for additional project costs, which may be used for project-related expenses such as software, equipment, travel, or consultant fees. (See sample budget.) Institutional indirect costs will not be covered.

Objectives

The aim of this program is to provide scholars the means to pursue intellectually significant projects that deploy digital technologies intensively and innovatively.

The fellowship therefore includes a stipend to allow an academic year’s leave from teaching, and funds that may be used for purposes such as:

  1. Access to tools and personnel for digital production. This could include acquiring hardware and software, engaging consultants, or purchasing access to digital collections. Preference will be given to project plans that make the most efficient use of existing cyberinfrastructure, either on the applicant’s campus, host institution, or beyond.
  2. Collaborative work. Applications are encouraged that include, where appropriate, plans for contact with centers for humanities computing or with disciplinary and interdisciplinary research centers (such as campus and national humanities centers).
  3. Dissemination and Preservation. Applicants must specify how their projects will be presented and preserved. Applicants should also outline strategies for raising the visibility of their projects at workshops, seminars, conferences, and meetings of their field or discipline.

While demonstration of scholarly excellence will be the primary criterion for selection, such excellence should be manifest in the digital context. Applicants should discuss both the intellectual ambitions of the project and its technological underpinnings. Proposals should specify how digital technologies add value to humanistic study.

Further, proposals will be evaluated relative to the technical requirements for completing a successful research project; evidence of significant preliminary work already completed; the comparative advantage of the proposed project as measured against other related or similar projects; and (as appropriate) those features of the proposal that would promote teamwork and collaboration in the course of the project. Successful applicants should also indicate how their projects articulate with the local infrastructure at their home institutions or the institution hosting the project.

Applicants must present a coherent plan for development of their project, including a description of tasks to be accomplished within the period of the fellowship, and the budget required for those tasks. The project budget is an essential element of the application and its evaluation will weigh in the overall selection process. The project plan should reflect a thoughtful approach to the project’s sustainability, scalability, dissemination, and preservation, and include a statement addressing intellectual property issues.

All applications must include the endorsement of a senior administrator of the applicant’s institution or the institution hosting the project. This endorsement should include discussion of how the institution’s existing cyberinfrastructure complements and supports the technologies to be developed for the specified project.

Eligibility

  1. This program is open to scholars in all fields of the humanities and the humanistic social sciences.
  2. Applicants must have a Ph.D. degree conferred prior to the application deadline. (An established scholar who can demonstrate the equivalent of the Ph.D. in publications and professional experience may also qualify.)
  3. U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status is required as of the application deadline.

Application Requirements

Applications must be submitted online and must include:

  • Completed application form
  • 10-page Proposal (double spaced, in Times New Roman 11-point font). The proposal should explain your research plan in relation to the objectives of the Digital Innovation Fellowship Program. The narrative statement should explain, briefly but specifically, what you plan to do and why, as well as describe progress already made, make clear the relevance of the project to your professional experience, and discuss the significance of this work within your specific and general fields. Please balance the description of specific work plans against an overview of your goals and the contribution this project will make to digital scholarship generally and to the particular scholarly field(s) it engages. Furthermore, proposals should explicitly state the means and tools (software, applications, interfaces) to be used to accomplish the project’s goals. Proposals should present plans for how the project will be sustained and preserved over time, and how the applicant will disseminate notice of its availability.  Please give your proposal a brief, descriptive title, and label sections of your narrative as appropriate to assist readers.   In addition, if your project is part of a collaborative undertaking, it is essential to explain that context and describe your relationship to the other participants. Please also list the names of your colleagues and indicate whether or not those individuals are also applying for ACLS fellowships in the current competition.
  • 3-page Bibliography providing an overview of the publications central to advancing the project; annotation may be provided to accompany certain items
  • Publications list (no more than two pages)
  • Project plan (no more than three pages) providing a coherent plan for development of the project, including a description of tasks to be accomplished within the period of the fellowship. This plan should reflect a thoughtful approach to the project’s sustainability, scalability, dissemination, and preservation, and include a statement addressing intellectual property issues.
  • Budget plan (no more than two pages) providing a detailed account of the proposed use of the research funds. (See sample budget.)
  • 3 reference letters
  • Institutional statement from a senior official of your home institution or the institution hosting the project (dean, provost, president, or other appropriate person). The provided form asks the institutional representative to confirm that the institution’s existing cyberinfrastructure complements and supports the technologies to be developed for the specified project.

Criteria Used in Judging ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowship Applications

Peer reviewers in this program are asked to evaluate all eligible proposals on the following five criteria:

  1. Scholarly excellence, in terms of the project’s intellectual ambitions and technological underpinnings.
  2. The project’s feasibility.
  3. The project’s intellectual, technological, and institutional sustainability.
  4. The project’s portability, accessibility, and scalability. Will it be widely used by the scholarly field it concerns?
  5. The project’s articulation with local infrastructure at the applicant’s home institution or at the institution hosting the project.

For more details, visit http://www.acls.org/grants/Default.aspx?id=508

International Collaborative Research Grant (Deadline June 1)

This grant supports international research collaborations between two or more qualified scholars, where the principal investigators bring different and complementary perspectives, knowledge, or skills to the project. Supplemental funds are also available to provide essential training for academic research participants in ICRG-funded projects (co-applicants, students, as well as other professional colleagues). By encouraging international collaborations, the grant contributes to the development of an international anthropology that values and incorporates different national perspectives and resources. By providing training funds, the grant helps to build capacity in countries where anthropology may be under-resourced. Priority is given to those projects involving at least one principal investigator who is a citizen of, and is working and residing in, a country where anthropology is underrepresented and where there are limited resources to develop the discipline. Other international collaborations will, however, be given serious consideration where they are consistent with at least two of the following aims of the foundation: – Bring together researchers with different national perspectives that complement each other and enrich the research – Strengthen anthropology in countries where there are limited resources to support its development – Combine different areas of expertise and knowledge that will benefit both researchers

Proposals must involve collaboration between two or more researchers of different nationalities who are working in different countries. Each researcher must hold a doctorate or equivalent qualification in anthropology or a related discipline. Scholars are eligible without regard to institutional or departmental affiliation. If any of the applicants is a current or past grantee of the Foundation s/he must have completed all the requirements of their existing grant, including submission of the final report, before a new application can be accepted. ICRG applications that were unsuccessful in a prior funding cycle may be resubmitted only if they are accompanied by a resubmission statement, explaining how the application is different from the prior application and how the referees’ comments have been addressed. 

The grants are for a maximum of $30,000 for the research project. Proposals which include the optional training element can have an increased funding request up to a maximum of $35,000, of which no more than $10,000 can be for essential training purposes.

NEH Fellowships (deadline May 1, 2013)

Fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources in the humanities. Projects may be at any stage of development. CFDA 45.160

The Fellowships program accepts applications from researchers, teachers, and writers, whether they have an institutional affiliation or not. All U.S. citizens, whether they reside inside or outside the United States, are eligible to apply. Foreign nationals who have been living in the United States or its jurisdictions for at least the three years prior to the application deadline are also eligible. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply. Applicants who have satisfied all the requirements for a degree and are awaiting its conferral are eligible for NEH Fellowships; but such applicants need a letter from the dean of the conferring school or their department chair attesting to the applicant’s status as of May 1, 2013. NEH encourages submission of Fellowships applications from faculty at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Fellowships cover periods lasting from six to twelve months at a stipend of $4,200 per month. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a 12-month period. The fellowships do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs. Recipients may begin their awards as early as January 1, 2014, and as late as September 1, 2015. The award period must be full-time and continuous. Teaching and administrative assignments or other major activities may not be undertaken during the fellowship period.

http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships

Gilder Lehrman Center Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery Fellowship

A residential fellowship with The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

http://www.yale.edu/glc/info/trafficking.htm

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition (GLC), part of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University, invites applications for a residential fellowship from scholars and public intellectuals to study the fundamental origins and circumstances surrounding debt bondage, forced labor, human trafficking, and other forms of modern day slavery. Traditional academics as well as writers/researchers without academic institutional affiliation are encouraged to apply. The Center is offering one fellowship in 2013-14.

This is an interdisciplinary fellowship program, based in history and the social sciences, which aims to promote innovative research on the origins and conditions that lead to contemporary slavery. In recent years many NGOs and other activists have worked very hard to provide data, to engage in intervention, and to raise public and governmental awareness on this international problem. At the GLC and at Yale, and at other cooperating institutions such as the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati we believe the issues of modern slavery would benefit from a more robust research base rooted in, but not necessarily limited to, historical analysis and interpretation.

The Fellow will be expected to be in full-time residence during the academic year beginning September 1, 2013. An earned doctorate in a relevant field or alternatively equivalent qualifications for research and teaching are expected for the successful candidate. In addition to working on his/her own research project, the Fellow is expected to teach one course related to his/her research and hold related office hours for students, participate in the fall conference and offer one public lecture or conduct a workshop either at Yale or at the Freedom Center in Cincinnati. The Fellow is also expected to interact with students and faculty, contribute to the intellectual life of the Center, and participate in its collective activities and development. Ideally, the fellow will also complete a significant publication during his/her residency.

Under the direction of Professor David W. Blight, the Center fosters an intellectual community at Yale through the interaction of students, faculty, and visiting scholars interested in the understanding of all aspects of the institution of slavery from the earliest times to the present. The Center organizes various activities, including lectures, speaker series, workshops, and conferences. For more information, visit www.yale.edu/glc.

Stipend and Resource Information
The successful fellow will receive an academic year stipend of $55,000 plus individual health insurance coverage. All Gilder Lehrman Center Fellows will have full access to the Yale University libraries and email. Normally, Fellows can expect shared office space, computer access and basic office supplies. Interested candidates, who have other sources of funding, may apply with a clear indication of their funding situation. All applicants should indicate clearly whether they are seeking full or partial funding. AA/EOE; applications from women and minorities are encouraged.

Application Process
Applicants should apply through Academic Jobs On-Line athttps://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/2477 and must include the following:

  1. Cover letter, including current e-mail address
  2. Current curriculum vitae, including publications
  3. A 1500-word description of the proposed research project. The description should include the background, nature, importance, specific objectives, and methodology of the proposed research project.
  4. Two letters of recommendation. Referees should discuss the candidate’s teaching ability as well as other points. Letters of reference can be uploaded directly by the referees through the online application site.
  5. An official university transcript (graduate level, if applicable).
  6. A summary of the proposed course (300-word max)

Deadline for submission: March 1, 2013

For additional information email gilder.lehrman.center@yale.edu.
Late or incomplete applications will NOT be accepted.

 

Gilder Lehrman Center 2013-14 Faculty and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University invites applications for its 2013-2014 Fellowship Program. The Center seeks to promote a better understanding of all aspects of the institution of slavery from the earliest times to the present. We especially welcome proposals that will utilize the special collections of the Yale University Libraries or other research collections of the New England area, and explicitly engage issues of slavery, resistance, abolition, and their legacies. Scholars from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. To support both established and younger scholars in researching projects that can be linked to the aims of the Center, the GLC offers two types of residential fellowships:

One-month Fellowships

The Gilder Lehrman Center will award several one-month fellowships between September 2013 and May 2014. Please specify your preference for residency in your application. The one-month fellowships are designed for scholars who are working on short-term projects including articles, book chapters, or other research endeavors. The one-month fellowship provides support of $3,208, plus library privileges and office space.

 Four-month Fellowships

The Gilder Lehrman Center will award two four-month fellowships, one in the fall semester (from September to December 2013), and one in the spring semester (from either January to April 2014 or February to May 2014). Please specify your preference for residency in your application. The four-month fellowships are designed for scholars who are working on short-term projects including articles, book chapters, or other research endeavors. The four-month fellowship provides support of $12,832, plus health insurance (if requested), library privileges, and office space.

Fellowship Requirements

Applicants MUST have received the Ph.D. prior to the beginning of their appointment. Both established and younger scholars are invited to apply. Fellows will be expected to participate in the intellectual life of the GLC and the larger Yale community, and to acknowledge the support of the GLC and the MacMillan Center in publications and lectures that stem from research conducted during the fellowship term. All fellows will be expected to offer one public lecture during their tenure at Yale.

Application Information

To apply to the Gilder Lehrman Center Fellowship Program, you are required to submit the following materials via Academic Jobs Online:

  • Cover Letter
  • Curriculum Vitae (CV),
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Three to five page statement regarding intended research project (research statement)

A complete application, including letters of recommendation, must be uploaded to the Academic Jobs Online website by Friday, March 1, 2013. No late applications will be accepted.

Click here to access Academic Jobs Online and to apply for the GLC fellowship.

 

2013 Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship Guidelines Released for Contemporary Visual Artists in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin

About the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship

Now in its 8th year, the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowships were established to increase public awareness of contemporary visual art in the Midwest. The intent of the fellowship is to reward creativity and encourage emerging and established individual artists by supporting their artistic development.

2013 Fellowship Overview
In 2013, five $25,000 fellowships will be awarded.

Eligibility Criteria
Applicants must meet the below eligibility criteria by the submission due date.

  • AGE 25 or older by February 28, 2013
  • RESIDENT of either Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota or Wisconsin as of February 2012
  • COMMITMENT to reside in Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota or Wisconsin the duration of the fellowship (May 2013-May 2014).

Past Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellows are not eligible to apply.

Fellowship Categories
Applicants must work in one of the following mediums. (Wearable or functional decorative art including quilts, jewelry, vessels or pottery will not be considered.)

  • Installation
  • Sculpture
  • New media (video, computer generated or 3-D)
  • Selection Criteria
  • All applicants will be reviewed in an anonymous process by a nationally selected jury.  The Juror will review digital images and/video and the accompanying narrative based on the following criteria.
  • Quality and skill
  • Creativity and uniqueness
  • Commitment to developing work
  • Impact the award will have on the artist’s career

Application Due Date: February 28, 2013 by 5:00pm EST

The Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowships are made possible by the Efroymson Family Fund, a donor-advised fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF).

Download the complete 2013 guidelines and submission instructions here:  http://bit.ly/VqSKeD

Funding: Kress Conservation Fellowships

L0074

Kress Conservation Fellowships

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=1956
URL for complete guidelines: http://www.kressfoundation.org/fellowships/default.aspx?id=38

IU Internal Deadline: 2/1/2013
Foundation Deadline: 3/8/2013

Brief Description:

The Kress Conservation Fellowships provide competitive grants to museums and other conservation facilities which sponsor supervised internships in the conservation of specific objects and onsite training. The purpose is to provide a wide range of post-graduate fellowship opportunities that will help develop the skills of emerging conservators. Overall, the program seeks to support a set of internships that offer:

  • A variety of specialty areas (paintings, paper, objects, etc.)
  • Opportunities for graduates of a variety of North American graduate programs
  • Opportunities to work in a variety of institutions, from large municipal museums to university museums and other conservation facilities, as well as sites outside the U.S.
  • A combination of proven Fellowship sites as well as opportunities at institutions that have not previously hosted Kress Fellows

Award Amount:

Nine $32,000 Fellowships are expected to be awarded each year for one-year post-graduate internships in advanced conservation at a museum or conservation facility. Typically, $27,000 is allocated as a fellowship stipend, and $5,000 toward host institution administrative costs, benefits for the Fellow, and other direct costs of hosting the Fellowship. Most Fellowships begin in late summer or early fall, and run for a term of 9 to 12 months.

Eligibility:

Application must be made by the museum or conservation facility at which the internship will be based. Fellows should have completed (or will complete prior to the Fellowship) a masters-level degree in conservation prior to beginning the Fellowship. The Fellowship candidate may be identified in advance of application by the host institution or recruited subsequently.

Priority is given to first-year requests, but worthy projects that clearly outline benefits to the Fellow for a second year of Fellowship can be and have been funded.

Limitation: One per museum

To apply for IU Internal competition:

February 1, 2013 is only a suggested internal deadline. Application must be made by the museum or conservation research facility at which the internship will be based. Contact the director of the museum if you are interested in this program.