Herron School of Art and Design is in the thick of IUPUI’s entrepreneurial culture

Herron School of Art and Design

IUPUI provides many pathways for students who want to learn more about the art and science of entrepreneurship. Herron School of Art and Design is one of the places on campus where entrepreneurial spirit is encouraged and supported. Here are a few examples:

Herron’s Visual Communication Design graduate curriculum focuses on design thinking and leadership. It engages students with diverse community members and organizations through projects where students use design thinking processes to lead stakeholders to solutions that address a diverse range of real concerns. A recent meeting about “Developing an Entrepreneurship Culture at IUPUI” provided an opportunity to illustrate the application of these processes. According to Youngbok Hong, associate professor and coordinator of the Design Thinking and Leadership Graduate Program at Herron, “idea generation during this meeting was enhanced through the use of visual modeling, which captured both the breakout session and large group discussions in real time. Students and faculty from Herron served as the visual modelers.”

The latest modification to Herron’s physical space will be the new Think It Make It Lab in Eskenazi Hall. With an anticipated opening this spring, the Lab will give students access to even more digital technologies, building on Herron’s existing equipment and curriculum. Other faculty and students from across campus will also use the equipment, which will create synergy across disciplines. Students will explore the broad applications of design, production and fabrication that are in demand in a variety of fields. The Lab will expand Herron’s capability to educate its students about rapid prototyping and cross-disciplinary investigations with schools and departments including Engineering and Technology, Interior Design, Informatics and Computing, Motorsports and Medicine.

The Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life at Herron offers students professional practice experiences integrated into the academic curriculum. Students have opportunities to collaborate on projects with businesses, not-for-profit organizations, communities and government agencies that provide professional-level engagement and enhanced experiential learning. There are a wide range of projects—from designing an award in bronze to creating a painting for a magazine cover to developing large-scale installations. Students develop and present their concepts based on the needs of clients. Since the Basile Center was established in 2006, more than 900 students have participated in projects serving approximately 105 community partners.

Herron graduate students may also opt into experiences such as a new, interprofessional class that spans visual communication design, informatics and computing, nursing and more. With a working title of “Healthcare Revolution Challenge 2015,” the course is designed to offer one credit for each of three semesters. Students will go through the course as cohorts, collaborating on cases for actual healthcare clients and presenting their proposed solutions in a “Shark Tank” style setting. Eva Roberts, Visual Communication Design department chair, said “Herron faculty members are among the developers and presenters of this distinctively formatted course, the aim of which is a working endeavor to humanize healthcare and increase access by disrupting the current system.”

Herron announces the Think It Make It Lab, where art, design and technology converge

The new Think It Make It Lab at Herron will include equipment and projects like these and more (clockwise): Art work from Herron's 2013 Undergraduate Student exhibition, printed with a 3-D printer; A Stratasys Objet 30 3-D printer; detail from a bench created by then Herron graduate student Vincent Edwards using a CNC router; an EZ Router CNC router. (images: Herron staff, Michelle Pemberton, Stratasys and EZ router)

The new Think It Make It Lab at Herron will include equipment and projects like these and more (clockwise): Art work from Herron’s 2013 Undergraduate Student exhibition, printed with a 3-D printer; A Stratasys Objet 30 3-D printer; detail from a bench created by then Herron graduate student Vincent Edwards using a CNC router; an EZ Router CNC router. (images: Herron staff, Michelle Pemberton, Stratasys and EZ router)

With the aim of merging technology with traditional creative processes, Herron School of Art and Design announces The Think It Make It Lab, a new physical space that will help art and design students, and others on the IUPUI campus, become better informed about the broad applications of design, production and fabrication in a variety of fields.

“We are so excited at the prospect of providing a collaborative environment for research and experimentation at the intersection of art, design, technology and culture,” said Herron’s dean, Valerie Eickmeier. “Centers like this are common in Silicon Valley, but there are few housed in schools of art and design and they are scarce in the Midwest.”

“The Think It Make It Lab promotes the creative use of new technologies in a collaborative environment for research and experimentation. The Lab expands Herron’s capability to educate students to work on concept design and prototyping using a variety of digital fabrication methods. Students and faculty working in this lab engage in research, design, digital fabrication and production methodologies that will be invaluable to their own creative and professional development and to 21st century industry,” she said. “It will also be interesting to see how the center helps to foster collaborations between programs on the IUPUI campus.

“Herron already has formed solid partnerships on campus with the IU School of Medicine, the Fairbanks School of Public Health, the School of Informatics and Computing and departments such as motorsports engineering. We look forward to seeing how this lab accelerates exploration and furthers the appreciation of art and design expertise across many types of applications.

“The resources and practices of the Think It Make It Lab will enhance the fundamentals Herron already teaches in its studio concentrations. The Lab will also equip Herron students with the knowledge to design and make, guided by an informed literacy about technology and a skill set that is in very high demand in the job market.”

Eickmeier said that associate vice president for learning technologies at IUPUI, Anastasia (Stacy) Morrone, Ph.D., was instrumental in bringing Herron’s vision for the Think It Make It Lab to life. “She grasped how our vision meshed with her mission of transformative teaching through the innovative use of technology. She advocated for the commitment of important startup funding.”

Morrone said, “This lab will be a new kind of learning space for students, and the first of its kind at Indiana University. A huge part of IU’s mission, and the mission of University Information Technology Services (UITS), is to provide the technology that our faculty and students need to learn, innovate and discover—key tenets of the maker culture. We are pleased to have played a part in ensuring that IUPUI students and faculty will have access to these exciting technologies.”

Recent additions to Herron’s equipment—a 3-D scanner, 3-D printers and a CNC (computer numeric control) router—started the ball rolling, quickly making a significant impact on the curriculum and training of Herron students.

The Lab will add a new design studio with the newest computers, cameras, scanners and printers—adjacent to a digital fabrication lab containing equipment including large-format CNC routers and laser cutters, plasma cutters and milling machines.

This combination, housed in Herron’s Eskenazi Hall in close proximity to the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, will accelerate exploration of digital production techniques, rapid prototyping and people-centered design research for undergraduates and graduates alike. The faculty and students currently using digital design and fabrication processes understand that the possibilities and applications in industry are boundless.

The Purdue School of Engineering and Technology on the IUPUI campus already has identified several courses that will benefit from the Lab. The School’s dean, David Russomanno said, “It will give students the ability to design for manufacturability, test their prototypes and become familiar with this equipment much earlier in their college careers. The faculty are seeking closer collaboration between research in engineering design and art. Aesthetics play an important role in mechanical design.”

The Think It Make It Lab also is expected to serve as a catalyst for visiting artist workshops, regional symposia and community based lectures and demonstrations, all of which will help establish connections that may spark exciting new partnerships with industries. Visiting speakers will be chosen from a diverse range of fields including art, architecture, engineering and manufacturing. These industry experts and scholars will expand the dialogue surrounding contemporary issues at the intersection of aesthetic expression, culture and emerging technologies.

Herron’s Community Learning Programs, which offer educational experiences to the general public, will also use the Think It Make It Lab to provide opportunities for teens to have project-based learning experiences in art and technology—experiences that help make connections to post high school careers and education.

“The space is under construction now. Faculty are very excited and they are developing curricula for fall,” said Peggy Frey, Herron’s assistant dean for fiscal and administrative affairs. “Some of the courses will be cross-listed with other schools. Additional equipment will begin arriving in January. We anticipate completion of the Think It Make It Lab by the end of the spring semester.”

The initial costs of the Think It Make It Lab are estimated $1.3 million and the project is Herron’s highest fundraising priority in 2015.

First Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art an unqualified success

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(r to l) IUPUI alumnus Carlos Knox, player development with the Indiana Fever; Herron Dean’s Advisory Board member Conrad Piccirillo; his daughter, Caitlyn Piccirillo; and Indiana Fever star forward Tamika Catchings enjoying the Herron Open. Image John R. Gentry Jr.

The first Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art, which took place in early June, was an unqualified success. Nearly 200 attendees were on hand to play the nine-hole miniature golf course inside Eskenazi Hall, created by teams of Herron students and faculty. The Herron Alumni Association designed a hole, too. It won the People’s Choice Award. The Sculpture Department’s hole, which came complete with students dressed as moles, won the Chairs’ Choice Award.

The event netted more than $30,000 in new scholarship support for Herron students.

Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art was selected as a NUVO Top Pick of the Week and featured in the Indianapolis Star’s 10 Things To Do. It was also covered by the Indianapolis Recorder, WTHR’s sports reporter Rich Nye, and mentioned on WFYI’s The Art of the Matter.

One thing is for sure (although at press time we don’t know exactly when) the event will return!