IUPUI music and arts technology lecturer does sound for film about World Cup stadium workers

thINDIANAPOLIS — Soccer is serious business in Brazil. Just ask IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology lecturer Ricardo Laranja, a native of that nation of 220 million people that is hosting the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament.

That passion for the sport most of the world knows as football spawned stadium construction to help handle the monthlong schedule of games, June 12 to July 13, which led to a documentary film, “Operarios da Bola,” loosely translated as “Blue Collar Players.” Laranja got involved as an audio engineer and composer when producer-director Virna Smith asked him to help complete the documentary.

Smith’s film highlights the desire of all Brazilians to be part of this year’s international festival. Construction workers created 60 male teams and four female teams to take part in a “blue-collar” tournament nicknamed the “Cup Before the Cup.” More than 800 workers participated in the event, out of 3,000 who constructed the Mané Garrincha stadium that will host the World Cup contests.

The movie is in Brazilian theaters nationwide and will show for 60 days. Several TV stations are negotiating to air the movie, including ESPN Brasil and Globo, the biggest network TV channel in Brazil. “Operarios da Bola” has been recently accepted to be shown at a film festival in Los Angeles in September.

For Laranja, it was a great opportunity to work on the documentary. He has refined Smith’s movie several times in recent weeks, tweaking the sound to fit his own standards of musical and sound perfection.

“I am so excited to be part of this historic project,” he said. “I believes it captures the passion and love for soccer for the Brazilian people. Brazil lives soccer, basically. It’s a religion.”

It also excites Laranja’s imagination.

“To us, the World Cup is a once-in-a-lifetime thing,” he said. Even he admits being caught up in the emotion of the games. “I’m actually going (to Brazil) on June 17, and I don’t even have a ticket!”

The music technology lecturer also was able to use the project to create learning opportunities for several Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis engineering and technology students, including juniors Raul Padro, Cale Forbes and Keith Ray.

Padro is a 59-year-old returning student who “performed all of the percussion on a song I composed and produced as part of the soundtrack for the movie,” Laranja said. “Many in Indianapolis consider Raul the best percussionist in town.”

Forbes and Ray provided sound design for the movie.

Laranja is well-acquainted with Smith, the filmmaker behind “Operarios da Bola.” He worked with her on a TV talk show called “Homem Total” (“Complete Man”), which aired in 42 countries in 2008, and was the chief audio engineer, sound designer and composer on Smith’s 2013 movie “O Encontro Marcado.”

The “Cup Before the Cup” caught the attention of the people of Brazil in part because of the opportunity of the tourney champion to compete against an all-star team led by former professional soccer star Ronaldo. The Brazilian legend was inspired by the project enough to take part.

Tournament organizers also hosted a canned food drive and a fundraiser during the stadium work, a service project that benefited local underprivileged communities, Laranja said.

“The Education of Auma Obama,” a film by Branwen Okpako: screening and discussion with filmmaker

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
University Library, Lily Auditorium
755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202

Admission free Reception with light refreshments to follow

Branwen Okpako is a highly talented and successful Nigerian-Welsh documentary filmmaker, who now lives and works in Berlin, Germany, where in 1999 she received a degree in Film Directing from the prestigious German Film and Television Academy in Berlin. Since 1995 she has produced several videos, mixed media installations, and films. Her work has been selected to be shown at film festivals in Europe, Great Britain, Africa, North America, and the Middle East. In addition to her work as a filmmaker, Okpako offers seminars, workshops, and projects in film studies and filmmaking and lectures at universities in the US, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world. Topics of her presentations include: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Otherness in Film; Black Identity in German Cinema; Migration and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Europe; The Art of Filmmaking; The Theory and Practice of Screenplay Writing, to name just a few.

For her 2000/2001 film, Dreckfresser (Dirt for Dinner), Okpako received, among others, the German Next-Generation-First-Steps Award for Best Documentary Film. For her 2002 film, Sehe ich was du nicht siehst? (Do I see what you do not see?), she received the D-motion special prize for the city of Halle, Germany. Her most acclaimed film, The Education of Auma Obama, (Die Geschichte der Auma Obama) has brought Okpako much attention. The film is a captivating and intimate portrait of the U.S. president’s older half-sister, who embodies a post-colonial, feminist identity. Dr. Auma Obama studied German at the University of Heidelberg from 1981 to 1987 before continuing with graduate studies at the University of Bayreuth, earning a PhD in 1996. Her dissertation was on the conception of labor in Germany and its literary reflections. For The Education of Auma Obama, Okpako received the 2012 African Movie Academy Award for Best Diaspora Documentary, the Festival Founders Award for Best Documentary at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles (both in 2012), and the Viewers Choice Award at the Africa International Film Festival (2011).

Her most recent project, Fluch der Medea (The Curse of Medea), a docu-drama about the life of the late German writer Christa Wolf, was shown at the Berlin Film Festival in 2014.

Okpako is currently a visiting professor of German at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. This event is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center, with additional support from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the German Program. For additional information contact: Jason M. Kelly, Director, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, iahi@iupui.edu, (317) 274-1689 Claudia Grossmann, Interim Director, IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center,cgrossma@iupui.edu, (317) 274-3943

Summer 2014 internship in digital documentary with Kentucky Historical Society

Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition Summer 2014 Graduate Internship

The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) seeks two graduate interns to work closely with editors and other staff of the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition (CWG-K). Through this competitive internship opportunity, successful candidates will learn the basic principles of documentary editing; assist in the identification, data collection, scanning, processing, and transcription of manuscript documents; and gain expertise in the use of the CWG-K project document control-and-editorial-management application. As time allows, interns may have the opportunity to learn, acquire and exercise additional skills associated with documentary editing.

The overall goal of the internship is to provide a high-quality, supervised professional practicum that introduces second-year and advanced American history graduate students to the field of documentary editing in order to enhance their education and future employability. Participating graduate students will gain a broad understanding of the goals of, planning for, and skills necessary to undertake large documentary-editing projects, as well as what is involved in their daily operations.

The internship will consist of 250 hours over the course of 10 weeks.

This is a temporary position, with stipend, based in Frankfort, Ky. Employee benefits are not available. Housing is not provided. Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D.

To apply, e-mail internship application and resume to khs.hr@ky.gov. No phone calls please. Application deadline is March 1, 2014. Application is available at the Historical Society website.

The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) is a state agency and membership organization that is fully accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The KHS mission is to engage people in the exploration of the commonwealth’s diverse heritage by providing connections to the past, perspective on the present and inspiration for the future.

Documentary about IUPUI “Cardenio” production earns three Emmy nominations

INDIANAPOLIS — The local public television documentary highlighting the re-creation of a “lost” Shakespeare play and its world premiere performances at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is in the running for three 2013 Emmy Awards.

“C.S.I. Shakespeare,” which spotlights the IUPUI performances of “The History of Cardenio,” received Emmy nominations in three categories: “Best Historical/Cultural Program,” “Best Program Editor” and “Best Program Writer,” the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Lower Great Lakes Chapter announced recently.

In spring 2012, the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and Hoosier Bard Productions, under director Terri Bourus, presented the premiere of “The History of Cardenio,” a 400-year-old play by William Shakespeare and collaborator John Fletcher. Bourus is a School of Liberal Arts associate professor of English drama.

“C.S.I. Shakespeare,” a 30-minute documentary that first aired in November 2012 on WFYI 1 Public Television (20.1 DT), tells the story behind the play and its production as the first event for the IUPUI Campus Center Theater.
“These nominations should be a source of genuine pride and happiness for everyone who collaborated in the creation of this documentary,” said William Blomquist, dean of the School of Liberal Arts. “We very much appreciate our partnership with WFYI, and wish ‘CSI: Shakespeare’ all the best in the regional Emmys.”

The IUPUI performances of “Cardenio” were based on the Shakespeare/Fletcher script as re-imagined by Gary Taylor, an internationally recognized scholar and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University. The performances were held in conjunction with an academic colloquium at IUPUI, “The History of Cardenio: Spain and England, Then and Now,” which attracted major Shakespeare and Cervantes scholars from around the world.
“C.S.I. Shakespeare” retraces Taylor’s 20-year quest for authenticity in re-creating the play, which included filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to reconstruct the original.

In “C.S.I. Shakespeare,” producer and writer Jim Simmons, an Emmy Award-winning WFYI producer, and his team captured behind-the-scenes interviews with Taylor, Bourus, Hoosier Barbs actors and colloquium guests. The documentary also features on-stage scenes of “The History of Cardenio” live performances. Pete Saetre and Jerry Prince edited the program.
The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Lower Great Lakes Chapter announced the 2013 regional nominations on April 25. The nominations for “The History of Cardenio” were among 19 Emmy Award nominations WFYI received in recognition of outstanding local documentary and public affairs program productions.

The 44th Emmy Awards ceremony for the Lower Great Lakes Chapter will take place Saturday, June 1, at the Windows on the River in Cleveland, Ohio.

Production funding for “C.S.I. Shakespeare” was underwritten by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.