The need for conversations around race and sexual orientation remains timely, as recent uAzQoo77_400x400events demonstrate that while progress is being made, much more must be done to realize full inclusion, equality and justice. It begins with increasing our understanding so we may be effective advocates and allies.
These structured, 3½-day dialogues provide selected participants the opportunity to explore issues related to race or sexual orientation in a safe environment where all voices can be heard in a climate of civility and respect. They can help improve the campus culture, build an inclusive and welcoming community, and improve inter-office relations for faculty and staff alike.

Two dialogue opportunities are being offered for fall:
October: Dialogue on Race
Thurs., Oct. 22
Fri., Oct. 23
Mon., Oct. 26
Tues., Oct. 27 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
November: Dialogue on Sexual Orientation
Mon., Nov. 2
Wed., Nov. 4
Wed., Nov. 11
Fri., Nov. 13 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. (each day,except as noted)

Steps of the IGD Model:
Stage 1: Creating a Shared Meaning of Dialogue
Stage 2: Identity, Social Relations and Conflict
Stage 3: Issues of Equity, Fairness and Inclusion: “Hot Topics”
Stage 4: Alliances and Empowerment

Registration Process: Please express your interest in participating by responding to this Survey Monkey Link.  Respond by: Oct 16 (race dialogue) or Oct. 26 (sex. orient. dialogue)
*Note: These dialogues require general parity (i.e., 50/50) in representation among participants based on the selected social identity for the dialogue (people of color/white; LGBT/straight). Ultimate selection for the dialogues will be based on efforts to achieve this parity.

Enduring Questions Course Development Grants

NEH LogoThe National Endowment for the Humanities offers grants of up to $38,000 to support the development of a new course that will foster intellectual community through the study of an enduring question.

Deadline: September 11, 2014

For more information about Enduring Questions, please visit http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/enduring-questions.

Program Details

What is good government? What is friendship? Are there universals in human nature? What are the origins of the universe?

Enduring Questions grants support the development by up to four faculty members of a new course on a fundamental concern of human life that is addressed by the humanities. This question-driven course encourages undergraduates and teachers to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential ideas, works, and thinkers over the centuries and into the present day.

Enduring questions persist across historical eras, societies, and regions of the world; they inform intellectual, ethical, artistic, and religious traditions; they engage thoughtful people from all walks of life; they transcend time and place and yet are immediate and present in our lives. Enduring questions have more than one plausible or compelling answer, allow for dialogue across generations, and inspire genuine intellectual pluralism.

An Enduring Questions course may be taught by faculty from any department or discipline in the humanities or by faculty outside the humanities (for example, astronomy, biology, economics, law, mathematics, medicine, or psychology), as long as humanities sources are central to the course.

Recent Projects

  • Macomb Community College, Elliot Meyrowitz: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Just War”
  • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Padma Viswanathan: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Literature and Morality”
  • Middlebury College, Timothy Billings: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Translation”
  • University of North Georgia, Renee Bricker, Donna Gessell, Michael Proulx, and George Wrisley: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Peace”


Consult the grant guidelines and frequently asked questions online.

Contact us:
(202) 606-8380

Learn More
NEH Grant Programs and Deadlines

NEH Division of Education Programs

About NEH