Exploring Confucian Depth in Spatial Narrative

0003110On July 23, IUPUI welcomes Dr. Wu Zongjie for a presentation at the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 309 at 2:00 p.m. In his lecture, Dr. Wu uses spatial narratives and deep maps to explore the Confucian approach to narrating space and place by presenting his recent research projects in Quzhou and Zoucheng, both cities noted for their connection to Confucius and his family lineage. A deep map is a detailed, multimedia depiction of a place and all that exists within it. It is a creative space that is visual, open, insightful, multi-layered, and ever changing. Dr. Wu will describe his innovative research about the way
traditional Chinese outlook of space can be represented and interpreted in the modern world.

As part of his visit, Dr. Wu will explore the potential for educational and scholarly exchanges between Zhejiang University and IUPUI. Zhejiang University, located in Hangzhou, is a leading institution of higher learning in the People’s Republic of China, with more than 8,400 faculty and 39,000 students. Wu Zongjie, Professor and PhD (Lancaster), is the director of the Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies and principle researcher at the Centre of Intangible Cultural Heritage Studies, Zhejiang University. His research and publications cut across multiple disciplines with a focus on cross-cultural discourses in cultural heritage, history and education. He is currently working as a consultant to the World Bank for Confucius and Mencius Cultural Heritage Conservation and Protection Project in Shangdong. in the Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies at Zhejiang University, China.

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IUPUI researcher to host international conference exploring China’s ancient links to Africa

Ian McIntoshINDIANAPOLIS — Ian McIntosh, associate director of the Confucius Institute in Indianapolis and director of international partnerships at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has been awarded a $17,800 grant from the Confucius Institute Headquarters Division of Sinology and China Studies to host a conference, “Exploring China’s Ancient Links to Africa.”

The conference will take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in October.

It will be attended by some of the world’s leading archaeologists in this field, including Sada Mire, director of antiquities in Somaliland, Felix Chami of Dar es Salaam University, Tanzania, and Qin Dashu of Peking University, China. IUPUI’s strategic partner in China, Sun Yat-sen University, will be represented by two leading archaeologists, professors Zhu Tiequan and Wensuo Liu.

“This conference will help to shed light on this early movement of peoples, especially Chinese navigators and traders, and their relationship with African merchants, especially from the Axumite Empire,” McIntosh said.

An Australian anthropologist, McIntosh is a co-founder of the Past Masters, an international team of heritage specialists, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists. The Past Masters received widespread media attention with their expedition to uncover the significance of medieval African coins from the long-abandoned Swahili settlement of Kilwa discovered in Tanzania on a remote island in northern Australia.

Participants at the conference will speak to connections between China and Africa, as far back as the Han Dynasty in the first century of the Common Era. Chinese coin and pottery finds from along the Red Sea and the Horn of Africa and also in East Africa, dating to the Tang, Song and Yuan Dynasties, will also be discussed.

For more information, contact McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu.

Confucius Institute in Indianapolis celebrates fifth anniversary

The Confucius Institute in Indianapolis will celebrate its fifth anniversary by doing what it has done since 2007: offering programs for Hoosiers that provide a window into China.

Beginning April 22, the weeklong celebration includes three Chinese films, a reception, followed by student performances and a symposium, “China in Africa: A New Model of International Development?” co-sponsored by the institute and the Sagamore Institute.

The films will be shown at 5:45 p.m. in IUPUI’s Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St. The films, which are free and open to the public, are “Painted Skin: The Resurrection,” April 22; “Red Sorghum,” April 23; and “The Treatment,” April 25.

A nonpolitical and nonprofit organization, the institute was established at IUPUI through an agreement between the Office of Chinese Language Council International and IUPUI, in partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University in China. The Confucius Institute at IUPUI is one of about 90 institutes in the U.S. and 400 around the world.

The Confucius Institute at IUPUI facilitates mutual understanding between the people of China and the people of central Indiana by promoting Chinese language and culture, and it creates educational, business and community relationships, said Dr. Joe Xu, a professor of anatomy and cell biology at the IU School of Medicine and the founding director of the Confucius Institute at IUPUI.

“It’s important for people in Indiana to see and understand China, if only through the window provided by the Confucius Institute,” Xu said. “Helping people know each other reduces misunderstanding.”

Since it opened its doors, the Confucius Institute has engaged Indianapolis and central Indiana residents through numerous activities, including promoting business exchanges; facilitating government exchanges; teaching Chinese using a variety of methods, including multimedia and the Internet; training teachers to teach Chinese in primary schools, high schools and colleges; teaching Chinese courses of various types in a variety of arenas; sponsoring academic activities, cultural exchange programs and Chinese language competitions; and showcasing Chinese movies and television programming.

“Whoever wants to understand Chinese culture and language, we are there for them,” Xu said.

The institute has established three Confucius classrooms for students in grades K-8 or K-12: two in Indianapolis and one in Brownsburg. It offers summer study abroad programs in China for high school students, college students and the general public as well as a K-8 Chinese language and culture summer camp at IUPUI. One-on-one Chinese language and cultural tutoring are  also available at the institute, as are translation and interpretation services.

The Confucius Institute has helped establish or participated in a range of cultural activities in Indianapolis, including a Chinese Language and Cultural Fair, the Indy 500 Parade, Indianapolis Chinese Festival and Chinese New Year celebration.

The partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University, a top-ten university in China with strong programs in the humanities, social sciences, business, law and life sciences, has produced a number of exchange programs at IUPUI, including programs at the Kelley School of Business and the Schools of Education, Informatics, Liberal Arts, Medicine and Public and Environmental Affairs.