Herron art professor earns unprecedented $300,000 in prizes at sixth annual ArtPrize competition

Anila Quayyum Agha

Anila Quayyum Agha

Herron School of Art and Design professor Anila Quayyum Agha has won the two top prizes at ArtPrize 2014, earning a record $300,000 in the international art competition held in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Her entry, titled “Intersections,” earned the ArtPrize 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize of $200,000 and split the Juried Grand Prize of $200,000 in a tie with “The Haircraft Project,” by artist Sonya Clark of Richmond, Va.

Agha’s wins mark the first time one entry has won both the ArtPrize grand prize awarded by popular vote and the grand prize awarded by a jury of international art experts. Her total prize is also the highest amount given to one individual in the competition, which awards the world’s largest art prize.

The professor’s unprecedented success was no surprise to Susan Scarafia, a 1983 IU Kelley School of Business graduate who traveled to Grand Rapids to join the thousands of visitors — including Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder — who viewed the entries on display at venues within the three-mile square art district in downtown Grand Rapids.

“I thought Anila would win from my first look at ‘Intersections,’” Scarafia, who has attended the past four ArtPrize competitions, said Sunday in an email interview. “There was buzz about it online. … once I got to the city, ‘Intersections’ was the piece others recommended most when I asked what I should see.

“But the way I knew, really knew, that ‘Intersections’ would win was that I could see that everyone who saw it was so involved with it. They weren’t just passing by or taking a quick picture. They walked into the room, stopped talking, looked up, looked around and kept looking from different angles. It seemed to me that this art really hooked into people.”

The “hooked” included one man who, while viewing “Intersections,” dropped to his knees and surprised his girlfriend with a marriage proposal, according to a news report.

Agha is associate professor of drawing and foundation studies at Herron, the art school on the IUPUI campus.

The professor’s “Intersections,” completed under a 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University, is composed of a 6.5-foot laser-cut wooden cube created using Herron’s new computer numeric control router.

When illuminated by the single bulb installed inside, the wooden frieze casts patterns of light and shadows inspired by the geometric patterning of Islamic sacred places as found in the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. During the 19-day ArtPrize exhibit, which ended Sunday, the entry was on display at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

“This is a wonderful and well-deserved award for Herron professor Anila Agha,” Herron Dean Valerie A. Eickmeier said. “Her prize-winning installation presents a perfect example of how our new digital technology equipment has assisted the creative work of our faculty. Anila teaches drawing, and her artwork is usually made on paper or fabric. This is the first work that she has created with Herron’s new computer numeric control router. Anila’s achievement provides an excellent example for Herron students as well.”

A smaller version of Agha’s winning entry was on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery at Herron last fall.

ArtPrize 2014, an independent competition open to anyone 18 or older, included 1,536 entries representing 51 countries and 42 U.S. states and territories. Entries were submitted in 2-D, 3-D, time-based and installation categories.

The contest, which drew 400,000 visitors last year, awarded two grand prizes totaling $400,000 and eight awards in the four categories worth a total of $160,000. ArtPrize has a parallel awards structure, with half of the awards decided by public vote cast by mobile devices or online and half by a jury of international art experts.

“Intersections” was chosen for the popular grand prize by the 41,109 registered voters who cast 398,714 votes.

After three days of deliberation over the 20 finalists selected by category jurors, the grand prize jury of Susan Sollins, Leonardo Drew and Katharina Grosse decided to split the $200,000 prize between “Intersections” and “The Haircraft Project.”

“By the end of our adventure here and after much, much discussion, we came to the conclusion that there were two artists of equal caliber and talent who had risen to the top of our list,” Sollins said. “We felt strongly that both artists had to be recognized equally. In short, there was nothing for it but to declare a tie.”

The winners were announced in Hollywood fashion during an ArtPrize Awards ceremony Oct. 10 at the Grand Rapids Civic Theatre. A town hall recap of this year’s competition takes place Wednesday, Oct.15.

Agha’s acceptance speech is included in awards ceremony television coverage posted online.

An after-show interview on Grand Rapids television is also available online.

Grant Opportunity: NSF Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity

NationalScienceFoundation

The National Science Foundation

This grant supports academe-industry partnerships, which are led by an interdisciplinary academic research team with a least one industry partner to build technological, human, and service system innovation capacity. These partnerships focus on the integration of technologies into a specified human-centered smart service system with the potential to achieve transformational change in an existing service system or to spur an entirely new service system. These technologies have been inspired by existing breakthrough discoveries.

PFI:BIC funds research partnerships working on projects that operate in the post-fundamental discovery space but precede being on a clear path to commercialization. These projects require additional effort to integrate the technology into a real service system with human factors considerations, which in turn might spawn additional discoveries inspired by this interaction of humans with the technology.

Award Amount:

Awards may be up to $1,00,000 with an award duration of three (3) years. In other words, the total budget request to NSF for the lead institution and all others participating in the project cannot exceed $1,000,000. Ten awards of $1,000,000 each are anticipated. Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

Eligibility:

·         Pay close attention needs to be paid to the Additional Eligibility Information.

·         The PI cannot concurrently be a PI on more than one active PFI:BIC award.

·         A PI who is named in a proposal in response to this program solicitation may not be named in a proposal for funding consideration in the same fiscal year to the Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research (PFI:AIR) program.

Limitation: Two per Indiana University    

Academic institutions are limited to participation on two (2) proposals as a lead institution preferably involving distinct application areas. A lead academic institution that has submitted a proposal has the option to participate as a subawardee on any other proposal submitted under this solicitation. Lead academic institutions that have submitted a proposal may also provide consultants to other proposals submitted under this solicitation.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

The selection process will include two phases.

 PHASE 1 – Letter of intent – Required

To be considered, submit a letter of intent which can be used to convey important aspects of the project, such as information about the required components: engineering, computer science, and social, behavioral and/or cognitive science and other scientific components and a preliminary list of participants to limsub@iu.edu by October 1, 2014. It can include:

  • Synopsis (Limit: 2500 characters, including spaces) convey important aspects of the project, such as information about not only the discipline(s) related to the technology, but also the disciplines to be included in this project: 1) systems engineering or engineering design, 2) computer science/information technology, and 3) human factors/behavioral science/cognitive engineering.
  • Other Comments (Limit: 2500 characters, including spaces)
  • Service System: Describe briefly the technology-based “smart” service system that is the focus of the project and how the technology will contribute to the creation or transformation of it. (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)
  • For the Primary Industrial Partner(s): Provide for each: Name, Founding Date, Number of Employees, Location (City & State), Commercial Revenues for the preceding calendar year, and Project Role (s). Reasonable abbreviations can be used. If you cannot accommodate the information, include the rest of the information under Other Comments (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)
  • Human Factors Tasks to be carried out which are essential to the operation of the Smart Service System: List a few major research activities which illustrate inclusion of human-centered considerations. (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)

 If more than two internal LOIs are received, those submitting will be asked to participate in Phase 2.

PHASE 2 – Internal Application (only those submitting internal LOIs will be considered)

Submit the following documents electronically to limsub@iu.edu, by October 13, 2014 for internal coordination.

  • Project Summary consisting of an overview, a statement on the intellectual merit of the proposed activity, and a statement on the broader impacts of the proposed activity. (Limit: 1 page)
  • List of participating senior investigators (faculty level and equivalent) by full name, institutional affiliation, and departmental affiliation. (Limit: 1 page)
  • Brief project description that includes at least the following elements: the importance of the research discovery; how the partnership came about; the exciting potential of the discovery to expand what the technology can enable, including market needs that might be addressed; how the partnership might evolve if the project is successful; and how the outcomes of the collaboration across organizations and disciplines will be greater than the sum of the outcomes of the primary individual partners alone. (Limit: 2 pages)
  • Letter of support from Chair or Dean of submitting PI.
  • Abbreviated CV for the PI(s) (Limit: 2 pages each)

Limited Submission URL:  http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2336

IU Internal Letter of Intent Deadline (required): 10/1/2014

IU Internal Application Deadline: (if needed) 10/13/2014

 Required NSF Letter of Intent Deadline: 12/3/2014

NSF Full Proposal Deadline: 1/28/2015

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IUPUI center helping K-12 students master economics

389636_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Teacher training, classroom materials and student competitions sponsored by an IUPUI academic center are giving local students a grasp of how the American economy works.

The Center for Economic Education, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and a member of the Indiana Council for Economic Education, works with K-12 educators to improve their understanding of economics and personal finance. It provides teaching strategies that can be easily integrated into classroom instruction.

A coach with a long history with the center recently had two teams of Carmel High School students place among the top four at a national competition testing their knowledge of economics.

“I have been involved with the IUPUI Center for Economic Education (and the Council for Economic Education) for almost 20 years,” said Michelle Foutz, coach of the winning Carmel teams. “I consider myself fortunate to be teaching economics in a state that places great value in economics education.”

One Carmel team placed second in the Adam Smith Division of the National Economics Challenge in May, while the second placed third in the David Ricardo Division. Advanced placement, international baccalaureate and honors students compete in the Adam Smith Division. The David Ricardo Division is open to students who have only taken a single-semester economics course.

The Carmel High School teams earned their way to the national event by winning the state championship competition hosted and coordinated by the IUPUI center in partnership with the Indiana Council for Economic Education.

“Economics Challenge, Commodity Challenge, Stock Market Simulation, Key Teacher Program and Econ Camp are fantastic center and council programs that have increased my enthusiasm for teaching and have also generated a lot of student enthusiasm for learning economics,” Foutz said.

“I would love to introduce Economics Challenge to all of my students. After participating in this competition, my students have a much greater appreciation for learning economics, and they have more confidence in themselves and in what they can accomplish. I can’t say enough about the benefits of this competition, and the positive impact on my kids.”

The Indiana Economics Challenge is one of two high school competitions the IUPUI Center for Economic Education, directed by Mohammad Kaviani, coordinates. The Center, in partnership with the Indiana Council for Economic Education, also coordinates the Indiana Personal Finance Challenge, an online competition that focuses on topics related to personal finance.  These competitions help ensure that Indiana students have a basic understanding of economics and the tools for making sound financial decisions.

More than 10,500 high school students from across the country competed in the national level of the Economics Challenge. Eight teams, including the Carmel students, completed exams and a critical-thinking round in the semifinals. Bellaire High School from Houston, Texas, and Hunter College High School from New York City were named first-place winners respectively in the Adam Smith and David Ricardo divisions following quiz bowl rounds for each final four teams.

CNBC has archived news coverage of the competition available online.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Fellowships

Woodrow-Wilson-International-Center-for-ScholarsThrough an international competition, the Center offers residential fellowships. Fellows conduct research and write in their areas of interest, while interacting with policymakers in Washington and Wilson Center staff. The center accepts non-advocacy, policy-relevant, fellowship proposals that address key challenges of past, present, and future issues confronting the United States and the world.  The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars aims to unite the world of ideas to the world of policy by supporting preeminent scholarship and linking that scholarship to issues of concern to officials in Washington. The Wilson Center invites scholars, practitioners, journalists, and public intellectuals to take part in its flagship fellowship program and to take advantage of the opportunity to engage actively in the center’s national mission. Fellows will be affiliated with one of the Wilson Center programs/projects and are encouraged to interact with policy makers in Washington, D.C. as well as with Wilson Center staff who are working on similar research and topics.

The center awards approximately 20-22 residential fellowships annually. The center tries to ensure that the stipend provided under the fellowship, together with the fellow’s other sources of funding (e.g., grants secured by the applicant and sabbatical allowances), approximate a fellow’s regular salary. Stipends provided in recent years have ranged from $26,000 to $85,000 (the maximum possible). Stipends include round trip travel for fellows. If spouses and/or dependent children will reside with the fellow for the entire fellowship period, money for their travel will also be included in the stipend. In addition to stipends, the center provides 75 percent of health insurance premiums for fellows who elect center coverage and for their accompanying family members. Fellows are expected to be in residence for the entire U.S. academic year (early September through May, i.e., nine months), although a few fellowships are occasionally awarded for shorter periods with a minimum of four months.

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/fellowship-application-guidelines

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International Violin Competition Exhibition

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June 20- July 24, 2014

   Frank & Katrina Basile Gallery
    Marsh Gallery

 

 

Herron is partnering on two gallery exhibitions for the 9th Quadrennial International Violin Competition of Indianapolis, one of the most respected music competitions in the world (taking place in September 2014).

A Juried Exhibition of Student Art, 30 prize-winning entries from first through 12th graders around Indiana will fill the Basile Gallery.

An exhibition of 19 works from a commission competition for Herron junior painting students, through a project of the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, will be exhibited in the Marsh Gallery.

About the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life:

The Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life enables Herron faculty and students to apply their talent and skill to real-world situations and needs. The Basile Center brings together Herron artists, designers, and art educators to serve the needs of the broader Indianapolis community. The projects that the Basile Center manages range from permanent public art installations to visual communication design projects, to arts administration and fine art exhibitions, and they yield incredible opportunities for professional practice for our students, including both our undergraduates and students in our graduate programs.