Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School The Glick Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), has made a $17,850 gift to Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School Program. One of the Glick Fund’s target areas is the arts and creative expression. Herron was one of 49 local organizations in the Fund’s latest round of grants, announced in mid-November, which totaled more than $4 million.

Last spring, 43 students requested tuition aid to attend Herron’s Saturday School. Only two scholarships were available. “This gift will help us better serve students in grades six through 12 from IPS and Wayne and Warren township schools,” said Jodie Hardy, director of community learning programs at Herron. The Glick Fund gift will provide scholarships for up to 70 students. Registration is already underway for spring 2014 Saturday School, which runs January 25 through March 15. Each class session is three hours. Tuition is $255 per student per eight-week session.

“We hope our grants will help address the immediate needs of the community while also building the long-term capacity of the organizations delivering services,” said Marianne Glick, director at the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation and The Glick Fund.

About Saturday School
Saturday School student from 2012

Saturday School student from 2012.

Established in 1922, Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School program provides quality art instruction for youth and adults for eight Saturdays each fall and spring.

Classes offer a variety of media—painting, ceramics, drawing, photography and more. Students’ ages range from second graders to high school seniors. Classes are also open to adults, allowing families to enjoy creating together. The average student is a creative junior high or high school student interested in discovering more about art and design while learning within a fun, safe and professional environment. Classes are taught by Herron’s degree-seeking students and take place in excellent studio facilities, giving many younger students their first exposure to a university environment.

Each semester concludes with an open house exhibition, reception and awards ceremony.

About the Glick Fund:

The Glick Fund is a donor-advised fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation. It was established by Eugene and Marilyn Glick in 1998 to support a variety of causes. Grants are awarded by invitation only, with no unsolicited grant applications accepted.

The Glick Fund also strives to align with the Central Indiana Community Foundation’s three broader community leadership initiatives of: Family Success & Making Connections; Inspiring Places; and College Readiness & Success – initiatives aimed at making central Indiana one of the best places in the nation to live, work and raise a family. To date, The Glick Fund has awarded over $49 million in grants to not-for-profit organizations. For more information, please visit the Central Indiana Community Foundation website.

Five by Five Starts with Big Car’s Event Feb. 8 at Service Center

With its arts-idea-pitching event on Feb. 8 at Service Center for Culture and Community, the Indianapolis-based community arts organization Big Car kicks off a new initiative that will award $10,000 to one winner at each of four themed events in 2013.

Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), the Efroymson Family Fund and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation are funding the series, called Five by Five, as a platform for sharing innovative arts ideas in Indianapolis. The goals are to help projects get off the ground while launching a fun series of idea-generating events, hosted and shaped by some of the city’s most important creative leaders.

The other three events — hosted by local not-for-profits People for Urban Progress, IndyHub and Harrison Center for the Arts — take place in April, June and September. Host organizations design each unique event, selecting the finalists and handling the judging. The only rules: projects must involve the arts; and each event features five finalists, presenting five slides in a maximum of five minutes. The winner at each receives $10,000.

Big Car’s theme for the Feb. 8 event is Revolutionize Your City: Art + Technology = Innovation. The call is simple: People with Indianapolis-related project or program ideas that bring art and technology together — could be low-fi or cutting-edge technology — email a 300-to-500-word description with three jpeg images (sketches, concepts, past work) to Big Car executive director Jim Walker at jim@bigcar.org by January 23. The five selected presenters will be notified by Jan. 25. Their slides will then be due on Feb. 6. Presentations will take place at a free public event at Service Center on Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.

A team of collaborators will help Big Car on the event and with selection and judging of ideas. Teaming up on the Revolutionize Your City Five by Five are Central-Indiana-based tech, design and startup innovators Dreamapolis, Idea Architects, IndySpectator, KA+A, The Levinson Center, SmallBox, and Verge.

The broad themes for the three other Five by Five events are Make Your City (People for Urban Progress), Face Your City (IndyHub) and Connect Your City (Harrison Center for the Arts).