IUPUI launches international recruitment initiative leveraging China relationships with Indiana

From left: Josh Zhang, General Manager of the International Exchange Center, Zhejiang Foreign Services Corporation; Sara Allaei, executive director, IUPUI Office of International Affairs; Thomas Upton, associate dean for Faculty Affairs and interim director, Program for Intensive English, IU School of Liberal Arts; Amy Conrad Warner, vice chancellor for External Affairs; Jie Chen, chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology

From left: Josh Zhang, General Manager of the International Exchange Center, Zhejiang Foreign Services Corporation; Sara Allaei, executive director, IUPUI Office of International Affairs; Thomas Upton, associate dean for Faculty Affairs and interim director, Program for Intensive English, IU School of Liberal Arts; Amy Conrad Warner, vice chancellor for External Affairs; Jie Chen, chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology

The Office of International Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is leveraging Indiana’s strong connections with a region just south of Shanghai, China, to increase the number of Chinese students enrolling at IUPUI.

 Zhejiang Province is a sister state to Indiana, a relationship held for more than 25 years, and Indianapolis is a sister city to Hangzhou, Zhejiang’s capital. Hangzhou is the fourth largest metropolitan area in China with over 21 million people.

The University Preparatory Program for high school students in Zhejiang will prepare a cohort of students to enroll at IUPUI, through collaboration with the International Exchange Center, Zhejiang Foreign Services Corp., an entity funded and run by the Zhejiang provincial government to promote exchange and programs in foreign affairs, education and culture.

Under the umbrella of the Zhejiang-Indiana sister-state exchange, the program aims to enroll an annual class of 35 recent high school graduates from Zhejiang Province as freshmen at IUPUI. Student may apply for fall 2015, and the first full class would be enrolled at IUPUI in fall 2016.

An IUPUI delegation joined up with representatives of the Zhejiang Foreign Affairs Ministry and members of the Indianapolis-Hangzhou Sister City Committee attending the Oct. 15 to 18 Hangzhou International Sister City Mayor’s Conference to celebrate the formal program launch.

“This program will continue to strengthen IUPUI’s strong relationships to Zhejiang and increase enrollment from the region,” said vice chancellor for external affairs Amy Warner, who led the IUPUI delegation. “It’s another example of our growing global engagement that enriches our city, our state and beyond.”

Josh Zhang, general manager for the International Exchange Center, Zhejiang Foreign Services Corp., said, “The IEC will provide the students with necessary assistance on intensive English and cultural training to help them fully prepare for academic and social success at IUPUI. We are confident that this meaningful program will be a highlight of the Indiana-Zhejiang sister-state exchange.”

The University Preparatory Program will target Grades 9 through 12 to form four freshman classes aiming for enrollment from fall 2015 through 2018. IUPUI representatives will annually travel to Zhejiang to present lectures and share information with each class of incoming students.

More than 400 students from China enrolled at IUPUI in fall 2014, the second largest sending country after India. Thirty of those students are from Zhejiang at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Increasing the number of students from China is a part of IUPUI’s overall enrollment growth strategy of increasing international student enrollment to 8 percent of the total student population by 2020.

 For further program information, contact Jan Aycock, director of international admissions at IUPUI, at tjaycock@iupui.edu.

China’s evolving philanthropy sector is focus of two-day summit in Indianapolis

Gene Tempel

Gene Tempel

Scott Kennedy

Scott Kennedy

Philanthropists, scholars and business people from around the world are gathering Friday and Saturday in Indianapolis for a summit on the present and future role of philanthropy in one of the world’s most rapidly growing economies, China.

The academic conference, at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Hine Hall, attracted so much interest that registration had to be closed. Organizers are hoping to eventually present some of the sessions online.

Scott Kennedy, director of the Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business at IU Bloomington, said he was surprised by public interest in the topic. More often, he sees Americans’ interest in China driven by concerns over its growing military and economic influence.

“I thought there would be less interest in social activism in China and what could be done to make the country a better place, but obviously I was wrong,” said Kennedy, whose center is based within the School of Global and International Studies. “There are people who are concerned about the environment, health care and a lot of other issues that the Chinese government can’t solve on its own.

“It just so turns out that America is the home of the global philanthropic movement,” he added. “Americans, both individually and through organizations, contribute a lot to our country and have been quite involved in China as well.”

Conference organizers had planned for about 75 people, but nearly twice as many — about 140 — are registered for the China Philanthropy Summit.

The conference highlights a three-year Initiative on Philanthropy in China funded by the Henry Luce Foundation and the Ford Foundation, jointly carried out by the IU Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business and the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“We are pleased to welcome our distinguished colleagues from China and U.S. institutions, both those presenting and those learning along with us as attendees,” said Gene Tempel, founding dean of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“This is an exciting time in China and in the world of philanthropy. The summit is a continuation of our work to learn from and learn with our Chinese colleagues as we work together to strengthen and inform philanthropy in both countries,” Tempel said.

Researchers from several leading U.S. and Chinese universities and institutions, including the University of Wisconsin, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Maryland, Tsinghua University and Sun Yat-Sen University, will present the findings from 11 research projects associated with the initiative.

In addition, panels of both young and seasoned practitioners from China’s philanthropic community will participate in a variety of panels. Among them will be Yang Peng, former president of the Shenzhen-based One Foundation, and Holly Chang, founder and president of the Beijing-based Golden Bridges Foundation. The co-founders of the Hong Kong-based organization Philanthropy in Motion also are participating.

Today in China, about 3,000 foundations and non-governmental organizations are rapidly expanding activities. Corporate social responsibility programs are proliferating and social enterprises are taking root. A substantial community of experts and activists with strong ties with the global philanthropic community has become increasingly active.

Although China’s economic development path has been very successful, a growing gap between the extent of problems facing society and the government’s ability to address them has developed, said Angela Bies, endowed associate professor of global philanthropy and nonprofit leadership at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Philanthropic activity could be a key way to fill that gap.

“China’s contemporary philanthropic sector is at a pivotal juncture where societal needs are complex and pressing,” Bies said. “And while philanthropic capacity is immense and social innovation and experimentation exciting, the institutional environment and organizational capacity for philanthropy remain emergent and in flux. In this regard, it is vital for scholars and practitioners to come together and jointly reflect on these issues.”

The Initiative on Philanthropy in China was announced last summer, and since then there have been nearly a dozen research projects and a workshop and conferences in China. Last spring, a new course on philanthropy in China was offered at IU Bloomington and IUPUI. Three students received internships in China, working with Cummins Inc., Mercy Corps and China Development Brief.

One highlight of the China Philanthropy Summit will be the conceptual presentation of “My Philanthropic Story,” a bilingual, user-driven website that will go live early next year. The site will be dedicated to promoting philanthropy in China through the personal stories of givers and recipients.

“It will be a way to promote philanthropy, not through academic research like the kinds we’re going to see this week, but through the voices of average people, which we think will be more powerful,” Kennedy said.

A mix of social media and connections from other key websites, combined with support from within the philanthropic sector in China, will draw attention to “My Philanthropic Story.”

Editors: As previously mentioned, registration for the conference is closed, but media are welcome. Contact George Vlahakis at IU Communications or Adriene Davis Kalugyer of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy to arrange for interviews.

IUPUI researcher to host international conference exploring China’s ancient links to Africa

Ian McIntoshINDIANAPOLIS — Ian McIntosh, associate director of the Confucius Institute in Indianapolis and director of international partnerships at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has been awarded a $17,800 grant from the Confucius Institute Headquarters Division of Sinology and China Studies to host a conference, “Exploring China’s Ancient Links to Africa.”

The conference will take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in October.

It will be attended by some of the world’s leading archaeologists in this field, including Sada Mire, director of antiquities in Somaliland, Felix Chami of Dar es Salaam University, Tanzania, and Qin Dashu of Peking University, China. IUPUI’s strategic partner in China, Sun Yat-sen University, will be represented by two leading archaeologists, professors Zhu Tiequan and Wensuo Liu.

“This conference will help to shed light on this early movement of peoples, especially Chinese navigators and traders, and their relationship with African merchants, especially from the Axumite Empire,” McIntosh said.

An Australian anthropologist, McIntosh is a co-founder of the Past Masters, an international team of heritage specialists, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists. The Past Masters received widespread media attention with their expedition to uncover the significance of medieval African coins from the long-abandoned Swahili settlement of Kilwa discovered in Tanzania on a remote island in northern Australia.

Participants at the conference will speak to connections between China and Africa, as far back as the Han Dynasty in the first century of the Common Era. Chinese coin and pottery finds from along the Red Sea and the Horn of Africa and also in East Africa, dating to the Tang, Song and Yuan Dynasties, will also be discussed.

For more information, contact McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu.

IUPUI lecturer to share insights gained on trip to China with students

When the subject turned to China and globalization in his introductory sociology classes at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, David Strong realized two things: His students wanted to learn more about China, and so did he.

When an opportunity to see China first-hand came along, Strong seized it. The sociology lecturer in the IU School of Liberal Arts applied for and was selected, along with other educators from Indiana colleges and universities, to visit China in May 2012. The trip was designed for faculty members who don’t specialize in issues surrounding China but want to incorporate material about China into their teaching.

The trip was sponsored and financed by the Indiana Consortium for International Programs, the Confucius Institute and IUPUI’s Office of International Affairs.

Strong said the experience, which also included a visit to India, underscored the reasons everyone should keep an eye on China and its future, including intellectual reasons and simple curiosity.

But even if none of those reasons apply, he said there is another consideration for Hoosiers: their jobs.
Strong said he was surprised by the speed of new construction in China and how quickly the country is modernizing itself. “You really can, in some respects, very palpably feel this ancient society sprinting into the 21st century.”

Going to China left him with a more nuanced view that he will share with his students.
Among the impressions he took away:

  • “Intellectually, you know China is a big country, but when you are there you realize how damn big it is. The capital city of Yunnan Province, Kunming, where we visited, is in southwest China. Kunming is considered a smaller, provincial capital in China. Yet the population of Kunming is greater than Los Angeles.”
  • “China is a land of contrasts — where farmers in rural areas still use no more technology than they did 500 years ago to grow rice in a country that has a space program.”
  • “In Beijing, we drove past sophisticated, modern skyscrapers on our way to the Great Wall of China.”
  • “Globalization has had its winners and losers in China. In rural areas, so much of the country seems unaffected.”
  • “As long as central power isn’t challenged, you don’t see or feel the power of the state as nearly as much as I thought you would.”

China has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, Strong said. “But what will be the future for the poorest Chinese?” Whether the well-to-do in China are able to live a peaceful, secure life depends upon the answer to that question, he said.

“I remember coming back after this three-week experience and Indiana seemed so small,” Strong said. “We know only a small percentage of the world’s population is American. But it is one thing to know that and another to see it in such a profound way.”

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5706/IUPUI-lecturer-to-share-insights-gained-on-trip-to-China-with-students