Poet to direct ‘Cadaver, Speak’ reading in collaboration between schools of liberal arts, medicine

"Cadaver, Speak" cover

“Cadaver, Speak” cover

Poet Marianne Boruch will direct a readers’ theater performance of her latest poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive.

“Cadaver, Speak” is Boruch’s eighth collection of poetry. The collection is centered on a sequence of 30 poems — narrated by a 99-year-old woman who is dissected as part of an anatomy class — that explore issues of life and death, knowledge and bodies. Six students from the IU School of Medicine and five students from the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI will read segments of “Cadaver, Speak” with Boruch.

“Marianne Boruch gets us to confront the most intimate details of our lives in a language that is both talky and imagistically rich,” says Karen Kovacik, professor of English at IUPUI and former Indiana Poet Laureate. “Thanks to the wily narrator of this poem, the human body becomes a site of wonder.”

The reading, free and open to the public, is part of the 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI.

Boruch will also talk about the poem on WFYI’s “Sound Medicine” at 2 p.m. Oct. 26.

Boruch, who teaches creative writing at Purdue University, has published in The New Yorker magazine and was anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and she was a Fulbright/visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012. In 2013, she received the prestigious Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for her previous collection, “The Book of Hours.” She also completed a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center.

Emily Beckman, assistant clinical professor in the medical humanities and health studies program and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, said the reading will be especially beneficial to first-year medical students.

“Students need to realize that the body on which they are working used to belong to a living, breathing human being with a story,” she said. “Boruch’s poem aims to not only tell that story, but encourages us to consider the individual, unique stories of all who are seeking healing.”

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading Series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is also made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

The Oct. 30 reading is co-sponsored by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts IUPUI as well as the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. The event was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Riley Hospital outpatient parking garage, 575 Riley Hospital Drive; the University Hospital garage, 600 University Blvd.; and the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.

RSVPs are requested to medhum@iupui.edu or 317-278-1669.

 

Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art at Yale University offers funding for book illustrations

thPublication Grants (Author)
Sponsored by Yale University, the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA), and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art – U.K., this grant provides up to £3,000GBP annually in order to cover costs which are the responsibility of the author and are personally expended by him/her. Eligible costs include specific photography and the production of images for their publication, acquisition of images, reproduction and copyright costs, or the production of graphics. Funds may not be used to cover publishers’ production costs or personal living expenses, travel, nor the support of research on the part of the applicant. Supported topics must have an historical perspective and pertain to topics in the realm of academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present.

The Paul Mellon Centre, an educational charity, supports scholarly publications, in both printed and online form, within the remit of British art and architectural history, as well as books and catalogs of exhibitions or permanent collections of British fine and decorative arts and architecture. It does not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. It has no discretionary funds outside its stated program. Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2015. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2014.

Authors and Editors of books which have been accepted for publication for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press are not eligible to apply for further support through the Publication Grant (Author) award scheme.

An application made by an author or editor will not disbar their publisher from applying for a Publication Grant (Publisher) for the production costs of the same project.

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