Exploring Confucian Depth in Spatial Narrative

0003110On July 23, IUPUI welcomes Dr. Wu Zongjie for a presentation at the IUPUI Campus Center, Room 309 at 2:00 p.m. In his lecture, Dr. Wu uses spatial narratives and deep maps to explore the Confucian approach to narrating space and place by presenting his recent research projects in Quzhou and Zoucheng, both cities noted for their connection to Confucius and his family lineage. A deep map is a detailed, multimedia depiction of a place and all that exists within it. It is a creative space that is visual, open, insightful, multi-layered, and ever changing. Dr. Wu will describe his innovative research about the way
traditional Chinese outlook of space can be represented and interpreted in the modern world.

As part of his visit, Dr. Wu will explore the potential for educational and scholarly exchanges between Zhejiang University and IUPUI. Zhejiang University, located in Hangzhou, is a leading institution of higher learning in the People’s Republic of China, with more than 8,400 faculty and 39,000 students. Wu Zongjie, Professor and PhD (Lancaster), is the director of the Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies and principle researcher at the Centre of Intangible Cultural Heritage Studies, Zhejiang University. His research and publications cut across multiple disciplines with a focus on cross-cultural discourses in cultural heritage, history and education. He is currently working as a consultant to the World Bank for Confucius and Mencius Cultural Heritage Conservation and Protection Project in Shangdong. in the Institute of Cross-Cultural Studies at Zhejiang University, China.

Sponsored by:

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Professor Jane Stadler-“Spatio-Temporal Storytelling: Mapping the Travels of Red Dog”

The Polis Center and IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute present:

Professor Jane Stadler
University of Queensland, Australia
“Spatio-Temporal Storytelling: Mapping the Travels of Red Dog”
Monday, March 4, 2013
2:00 p.m.
CA 508
Faculty, staff, and students are invited to attend
Professor Jane Stadler will present her explorations of spatial history, mapping, and mobility in relation to the film Red DogRed Dog is based on three books that narrate the true story of a nomadic Red Cloud Kelpie cattle dog that was adopted by the mining community of Australia’s northwest Pilbara region in the1970s. Representations of Red Dog’s travels highlight the network of economic, geographical, and cultural factors that shape mobility in Australia’s largest, richest, and least densely populated state. In relation to work in progress on The Cultural Atlas of Australia, a cultural heritage project that maps the settings of films, novels, and plays, Professor Stadler considers the challenges of mapping movement through space and time using digital cartography. She argues that using geovisualization techniques to foreground spatial history and mobility in Red Dog reveals complex relationships between the mining industry, the Pilbara community, and myths of national and regional identity conveyed in cultural narratives.
Jane Stadler is Associate Professor of Film and Television Studies in the School of English, Media Studies, and Art History at the University of Queensland. She is co-editor of Pockets of Change (with Hopton, Atkinson, and Mitchell, 2011), author of Pulling Focus (2008), Screen Media (with McWilliam, 2009), Media and Society (with O’Shaughnessy, 2012), and articles on film and phenomenology, ethics, aesthetics, identity, and landscape.