Pleasant Run Walk and Sketch

Rebecca AllanIn this engaging nature walk, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Tom Swinford, Assistant Division Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, will lead participants in creating nature drawings and poetry while learning about the ecology of Pleasant Run. Encouraging us to connect to and reflect on this important Indianapolis waterway, this event will culminate in the on-site creation of an electronic book of artwork, photos, and poetry.

We will meet at the Barth Avenue Bridge along the Pleasant Run Trail at 10:00 am. Street parking is available along Barth Avenue. A map is available here.

This event is free and all materials will be provided to participants.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, Big Car, Reconnecting to Our Waterways, Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, the Butler University Center for Urban Ecology, Earth Charter Indiana, and the da Vinci Pursuit.

Register here:

Co-sponsors:

Look/See showcases M.F.A. Exhibition and more during Herron’s biggest events of the year

Look/See 2015 Logo Courtesy of Herron StaffThis year at Herron School of Art and Design, there’s even more to May, with two Visual Communication Design events kicking off our celebration of the academic year end leading up to Look/See on Thursday, May 7, which includes a full slate of events at both Herron buildings.

Design Day at Herron—May 4
2015 marks the first-ever Design Day at Herron: Design Thinking for People Centered Innovation from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in room 143 of Eskenazi Hall. This introductory Design Thinking workshop will bring together visual communication design practitioners and community members to explore a particular challenge affecting Indianapolis. This workshop is open to anybody who is curious about Design Thinking. For more information, contact Youngbok Hong, coordinator, Design Thinking and Design Leadership Graduate Program, at youhong@iupui.edu. To register on a first-come, first-served basis,
RSVP to herron4u@iupui.edu. Use subject line “Herron Design Day” and include your name and phone number.

Momentum: Design in Action—May 6
Momentum is an exhibit of senior Visual Communication Design portfolios and capstone projects that will demonstrate the 37 students’ various interests, creative problem-solving processes and plans for the future, revealing the connections that they have made through the course of their time at Herron.

The May 6 opening is by invitation only for members of the local design community. The public opening will be on May 7 from 5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. in room 122 of Eskenazi Hall. Visit vcd.iupui.edu for more information.

Look/See—May 7

Honors and Awards
To start the party, join us for the Honors and Awards ceremony in the IUPUI Campus Center, room CE450, at 4:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and cheer the accomplishments of students and faculty alike.

M.F.A. Exhibition
Then it’s on to the 2015 M.F.A. Exhibition beginning at 5:00 p.m., which showcases pinnacle works by master’s degree candidates Brent Aldrich, Stephanie J. Beisel, Carly Connelly, Di Sun, Matthew Eickhoff, Jonathan Love, Andrés Marcial, Kristen Jane Morsches, Katie R. Smith, Stephen Smolinski, Shelley Spicuzza and Jac Tardie.

This culminating exhibition takes up all the available gallery space in both Eskenazi Hall and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Colin Nesbit, Herron’s gallery director, describes Look/See as “the crescendo of the academic year at Herron. For the students whose works comprise the 2015 MFA Exhibition, the last two years have build up to this single event. These students’ works represent the array of fine arts programs available at Herron performing at their highest level.”

Art Therapy
Nesbit continued, “and this year for the first time, Herron master’s degree candidates in Art Therapy Bonnie Burke, Chelsea Leeds, Elisa Pamelia, Meghan Sullivan, Mu-Chien Tsai, and Kaycee Wilson are going to have a display that explains their discipline and includes versions of their theses for people to look at.

Visual Communication Design
Master’s degree candidates in Visual Communication Design Kaelyn Donnelly, Jennifer Smerdel and Nicholas Walters also will have an interactive exhibition including panels describing their research processes, outcomes and contexts.”

Think It Make It Lab
The public will also get its first chance to see Herron’s new Think It Make It Lab in Eskenazi Hall, which is chock-full of the latest in 3-D and other digital technologies. Live demonstrations of 3-D printing and laser cutting will be included, with a memento for visitors to take home.

The festivities include tours, open studios and a print and ceramics sale, along with refreshments.

Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis will be available. Shuttle service between buildings will be available throughout the evening.

Herron offers hands-on experiences for prospective undergraduate students

Herron Discovery Day

Herron Discovery Day

What is it like to create art as an undergraduate student working alongside internationally recognized faculty in nationally acclaimed studios?

Herron School of Art and Design faculty and current students invite prospective students and their parents to discover first-hand what awaits them as the school opens its doors for tours, hands-on workshops and information sessions.

The art school, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, will host Discovery Day 2015 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22. Registration for the event has been extended through Jan. 15.

Morning sessions include tours of the Herron buildings — Eskenazi Hall,  735 W. New York St., and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave.  — and presentations by students and faculty.

Afternoon workshop projects include building simple wooden boxes in the Herron Furniture Design Lab;  creating a small sculpture in an intro to welding session; creating a print using the basic techniques of monotype;  and constructing a miniature book from beginning to finish, to name a few.

As an alternative to attending workshops, Discovery Day attendees may choose to attend actual classes and shadow current students throughout the day.

Herron art professor is in the healing business, bringing hope to veterans and others

Juliet King

Juliet King

Juliet King has never spent a day in military service during war or peace times.

But the Herron School of Art and Design assistant professor and licensed art therapist has taken up the fight to improve the lives of veterans facing emotional adjustments after their time on the battlefield.

Most recently, King, director of Herron’s art therapy program, signed on as the point person for the “Veterans Coming Home” campaign at the art school on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. The school has joined forces with WFYI Public Media and the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library for the yearlong multimedia, arts-focused awareness campaign to support Indiana’s veterans and their families.

Veterans Coming Home,” was funded with a $25,000 Corporation for Public Broadcasting grant and includes WFYI broadcasts of the stories of veterans such as Andrew Schneiders, Kris Bertrand and others.

In a Richard L. Roudebush Indianapolis VA Medical Center pilot group art therapy project spearheaded by King and Dr. Brandi Luedtke of the Veterans Affairs, Schneiders has found healing power in “illustrating his troubled Iraq experiences with art” and then talking with fellow vets, according to a WFYI report.

And as part of an arts intervention program, Bertrand, who was sexually assaulted while serving in the Navy 25 years ago, found an emotional salve in throwing clay on a potter’s wheel.

“That’s because art is inherently therapeutic,” King said in a “Veterans Coming Home” broadcast, now available online.

“Engaging in the creative process is something that typically is going to be a life-enhancing experience for you,” King said. “It gets your blood moving; it gets your brain working in different ways. It helps you relax, it helps you get distance from what it is that you might be living with in your life at the time.”

King’s hope is that the success stories of Schneiders, Bertrand and others will raise the awareness of the value of art therapy in helping soldiers and others deal with trauma.

The ultimate goal is to draw the support of lawmakers and service providers who can both advance the licensing of art therapists across the state and promote the employment of such professionals as clinical counselors. Female veterans would in particular benefit from an expansion of art therapy services since they have traditionally voiced a reluctance to attend co-ed therapy groups and cited the lack of art therapy services for women.

Art therapists hold master’s degrees in art therapy and are eligible for licensure as clinical mental health counselors who are trained to use art to help clients find ways to express things they might not be able to say with words, King said. Art therapy is an effective treatment intervention for helping anyone facing issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, which can affect not only war veterans but also victims of rape, torture, child abuse, car accidents and natural disasters, she said.

“We need more licensed art therapists,” King said. “(‘Veterans Coming Home’) is one way we are going about raising awareness. Hopefully people at the state level will pay attention and see the need.”

King is available for media interviews discussing her art therapy work with veterans. For interviews with King, contact Diane Brown 317-274-2195 or habrown@iu.edu.

From here to Helsinki, Herron’s Visual Communication Design faculty operate in the vanguard

Presenters including Youngbok Hong (front row, second from right) and Aaron Ganci (back row, left) at NordDesign 2014, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland Image courtesy Maria Solovjew

Presenters including Youngbok Hong (front row, second from right) and Aaron Ganci (back row, left) at NordDesign 2014, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland
Image courtesy Maria Solovjew

Assistant Professor Aaron Ganci and Associate Professor Youngbok Hong recently traveled to Finland to presented findings about the senior capstone course in Visual Communication Design they team-teach at Herron. They made their remarks during the NordDesign 2014 conference at Aalto University in Helsinki. Their scholarly trip was made possible by Herron Travel grants.

The central theme of the conference was innovation, said Hong. “In the area of innovation, design and product development, we quite often seem to know that something works in practice, but might lack understanding of the theoretical foundations of why. NordDesign 2014 organizers were looking for evidence-based academic work on topical issues of design, development and innovation to strengthen both our theoretical understanding and the connection between theory and practice.”

Hong focuses on Service Design and Ganci’s specialty is a subset called Interaction Design. They have identified these two fields as important to moving the design of new products forward and are using their experiences in these fields to design the coursework at Herron.

“Twenty years ago, products were physical objects that were mostly created by engineers, not designers,” Ganci said. “Today, we have a more diverse understanding of a product. It can be software or even a service experience. So this conference was a great place for us to share our ideas on how to prepare design students for 21st century careers in product design.

‘We’re trying to create an experience that better resembles the professional work that Visual Communication Design students might be doing. We recognize that you can’t make objects in isolation anymore,” Ganci said. “We’re predicting that the integration of several tracks into one is where the future of the visual communication design teaching lies. What we shared at this conference was the approach we are taking to help explain our vision of the design profession to our students.”

Ganci said this approach works well at Herron because “we are rooted in design thinking and people-centered design.”

Herron’s Visual Communication Design senior capstone provides a base of knowledge that can be applied to many different types of things a designer might make,” Ganci said. “We ask students to solve problems with a broad, integrated set of solutions, sometimes called touchpoints. We want our students to know how to identify these touchpoints and then design them at a high level.”

“Designers are great at seeing things through the eyes of the user,” he said. “A skilled visual communicator is a an asset when it comes to understanding and documenting an experience in order to improve it.”

In addition to traditional forms of visual communication design, Hong and Ganci believe “experience design is primarily what our students will be doing in the next five to 10 years.”

Read more about Hong and Ganci’s work and see examples of student projects here.

Volunteers’ actions still reverberate more than a decade on

The John Herron Society's namesake File image

The John Herron Society’s namesake
File image

A handful of enthusiastic volunteers inspired Dean Valerie Eickmeier to create the John Herron Society. Because of their vision 13 years ago, more than 100 society members support the school’s mission with annual, unrestricted giving at a minimum of $1,000. Many give much more.

While the numbers demonstrate the commitment of individuals in our community who value the arts, it is what happens because of their support that matters most.

The John Herron Society provides for student success, academic programs, community outreach and new opportunities and initiatives. This kind of private support is critical for Herron to compete on a national level as a premier school of art and design.

“I’ve enjoyed engaging with our community as individuals step forward with support to the John Herron Society,” Dean Eickmeier said. “Each year, it’s exciting to welcome new members and thank current members for their ongoing support. I also make it a priority to keep members informed throughout the year regarding what their support is making possible.”

One of the school’s priorities for this academic year is to enhance the learning and social environment for Herron’s students. Eskenazi Hall is dotted with new furniture—providing a space to build community. A student emergency fund is being established and a new mentoring program is being developed. Each of these initiatives helps ensure student success by giving students the resources and experiences needed to reach their educational goals.

Two of the newest members of the John Herron Society, Dr. David Crabb and his wife, Ellen, “believe the support of art, and Herron in particular, is important for several reasons,” said Dr. Crabb. “We both are involved in creative activities in art and design. Our children have been deeply involved in and benefitted immensely from deep and broad exposure to the arts— a common culture we share with them. Perhaps most importantly, learning about art opens our eyes to worlds we might simply miss, were it not for the training of perception and insight that art gives us.”

Herron is pleased to announce a challenge gift from Drs. Jane Fortune and Robert R. Hesse, who will match up to $10,000 of new John Herron Society gifts during the 2014-2015 academic year. Their generous support is meant as an incentive to recruit new donors, who are so important to Herron for a strong future.

John Herron Society members enjoy private receptions and dinners, behind-the-scenes experiences and unique interactions with students and faculty. Most importantly, members can be confident that their investment in the lives of others is an important contribution toward fulfilling Herron’s educational and artistic mission.

To learn more about becoming a member of the John Herron Society, contact Kim Hodges, Office of Development, at 317-278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu. To give online, visit www.herron.iupui.edu.

Mural design by Sichuga and Hankins enables volunteers to create on Lilly Global Day of Service

A group of Eli Lilly and Company employees painting a section of mural on October 2. The 2,600 square foot design was created by Herron senior Andrey Sichuga and alumnus Chad Hankins. Image courtesy Andrey Sichuga

A group of Eli Lilly and Company employees painting a section of mural on October 2. The 2,600 square foot design was created by Herron senior Andrey Sichuga and alumnus Chad Hankins.
Image courtesy Andrey Sichuga

A mural designed by two Herron School of Art and Design buddies, alumnus Chad Hankins (B.F.A. in Sculpture, 2013) and Andrey Sichuga, a senior majoring in painting, sprang to life when Eli Lilly and Company Global Day of Service volunteers painted it on October 2.

Eli Lilly and Company’s Global Day of Service benefits people around the globe wherever the pharmaceutical manufacturer has facilities. Indianapolis was no exception in this, the seventh year of the massive effort. More than 8,400 local Lilly employees fanned out across Indianapolis this year to complete hundreds of tasks—from pulling weeds to conducting fitness assessments in more than 150 individual projects.

One group of about 30 people busied itself with painting more than 2,600 square feet of underpass and columns at Harding Street and I-70 where a giant mural depicts a fantastic scene of flora and fauna.

The design was the brainchild of two Herron School of Art and Design buddies who estimate that they spent about three months all told developing the design and preparing it so the volunteers could accomplish their goal. The two were on site to direct the painting.

Their design collaboration happened by accident when they ran into each other in August at a creative placemaking event put on by Reconnecting Our Waterways and hosted by the Eiteljorg Museum. They heard about the project there.

The duo submitted separate designs to Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, a local Day of Service project manager. Ultimately Sichuga’s design prevailed. “He’s loose, I’m tight, he’s natural, I’m industrial,” said Hankins. “My design was somewhat political, his went for beauty.” Hankins and Sichuga decided to partner early on because of the sheer size of the area they had to cover.

Hankins tried to research iconic images from the west side—such as a long-gone rocket slide that was a favorite piece of playground equipment for generations in Rhodius Park, but he found it difficult to get ideas from the community about what they’d like to see. He said he felt that as good as the Harding Street mural is, the project would have been even stronger with more input from the people who actually live in the neighborhood.

“At first I thought it would be really easy—most murals are three or four colors,” Hankins said. “But our design needed 51 colors. Sherwin Williams donated the paint. It was like being a kid in a candy store when we walked in there. Keep Indianapolis Beautiful wrote the checks.”

“A project like this is not a walk in the park,” Hankins continued, noting that it had its share of challenges, including a giant pile of mulch that he and some friends had to move in order to transfer the paint-by-number design onto an underpass surface. He also had to borrow a generator to power a projector and trace the outlines in waning daylight, which made the cars whizzing by more of a concern.

“It’s the kind of job you take to build a portfolio,” he continued. “Design and scale-wise, we’ve had quite a learning experience.” In the end, watching the volunteers bring the perspective-driven design to life “was worth it.”

Sichuga said the experience of watching the volunteers was akin to watching “a garden blossom.” As an artist, he’s spent considerable time thinking about how to act upon society’s problems and make a “positive influence” through his work. “This project,” he said, “provided a glimpse of one way to go about it.”

Herron art professor earns unprecedented $300,000 in prizes at sixth annual ArtPrize competition

Anila Quayyum Agha

Anila Quayyum Agha

Herron School of Art and Design professor Anila Quayyum Agha has won the two top prizes at ArtPrize 2014, earning a record $300,000 in the international art competition held in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Her entry, titled “Intersections,” earned the ArtPrize 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize of $200,000 and split the Juried Grand Prize of $200,000 in a tie with “The Haircraft Project,” by artist Sonya Clark of Richmond, Va.

Agha’s wins mark the first time one entry has won both the ArtPrize grand prize awarded by popular vote and the grand prize awarded by a jury of international art experts. Her total prize is also the highest amount given to one individual in the competition, which awards the world’s largest art prize.

The professor’s unprecedented success was no surprise to Susan Scarafia, a 1983 IU Kelley School of Business graduate who traveled to Grand Rapids to join the thousands of visitors — including Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder — who viewed the entries on display at venues within the three-mile square art district in downtown Grand Rapids.

“I thought Anila would win from my first look at ‘Intersections,'” Scarafia, who has attended the past four ArtPrize competitions, said Sunday in an email interview. “There was buzz about it online. … once I got to the city, ‘Intersections’ was the piece others recommended most when I asked what I should see.

“But the way I knew, really knew, that ‘Intersections’ would win was that I could see that everyone who saw it was so involved with it. They weren’t just passing by or taking a quick picture. They walked into the room, stopped talking, looked up, looked around and kept looking from different angles. It seemed to me that this art really hooked into people.”

The “hooked” included one man who, while viewing “Intersections,” dropped to his knees and surprised his girlfriend with a marriage proposal, according to a news report.

Agha is associate professor of drawing and foundation studies at Herron, the art school on the IUPUI campus.

The professor’s “Intersections,” completed under a 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University, is composed of a 6.5-foot laser-cut wooden cube created using Herron’s new computer numeric control router.

When illuminated by the single bulb installed inside, the wooden frieze casts patterns of light and shadows inspired by the geometric patterning of Islamic sacred places as found in the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. During the 19-day ArtPrize exhibit, which ended Sunday, the entry was on display at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

“This is a wonderful and well-deserved award for Herron professor Anila Agha,” Herron Dean Valerie A. Eickmeier said. “Her prize-winning installation presents a perfect example of how our new digital technology equipment has assisted the creative work of our faculty. Anila teaches drawing, and her artwork is usually made on paper or fabric. This is the first work that she has created with Herron’s new computer numeric control router. Anila’s achievement provides an excellent example for Herron students as well.”

A smaller version of Agha’s winning entry was on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery at Herron last fall.

ArtPrize 2014, an independent competition open to anyone 18 or older, included 1,536 entries representing 51 countries and 42 U.S. states and territories. Entries were submitted in 2-D, 3-D, time-based and installation categories.

The contest, which drew 400,000 visitors last year, awarded two grand prizes totaling $400,000 and eight awards in the four categories worth a total of $160,000. ArtPrize has a parallel awards structure, with half of the awards decided by public vote cast by mobile devices or online and half by a jury of international art experts.

“Intersections” was chosen for the popular grand prize by the 41,109 registered voters who cast 398,714 votes.

After three days of deliberation over the 20 finalists selected by category jurors, the grand prize jury of Susan Sollins, Leonardo Drew and Katharina Grosse decided to split the $200,000 prize between “Intersections” and “The Haircraft Project.”

“By the end of our adventure here and after much, much discussion, we came to the conclusion that there were two artists of equal caliber and talent who had risen to the top of our list,” Sollins said. “We felt strongly that both artists had to be recognized equally. In short, there was nothing for it but to declare a tie.”

The winners were announced in Hollywood fashion during an ArtPrize Awards ceremony Oct. 10 at the Grand Rapids Civic Theatre. A town hall recap of this year’s competition takes place Wednesday, Oct.15.

Agha’s acceptance speech is included in awards ceremony television coverage posted online.

An after-show interview on Grand Rapids television is also available online.

Daniel Grant, 2014 Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Daniel Grant, whose frequent reporting on the visual arts appears in ARTnews Magazine, Huffington Post and The Wall Street Journal, will speak at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s Basile Auditorium on November 5 at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Grant will present What Collectors Want: The Business, Law and Art of Art Sales as
the 2014 speaker for the Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art. His talk will focus on how artists may communicate—in person, in writings and online—with collectors, dealers and curators in ways that will help lead to exhibitions and sales.

“The key is to for artists to be entrepreneurial,” said Grant, “looking for ways to advance their own careers rather than relying upon someone else. For many up-and-coming artists, the goal is to get into a gallery. That is not necessarily synonymous with selling one’s work or supporting oneself from those sales. It is easy to get lost in the idea that a gallery equals prestige, art world acceptance and a ready group of buyers.

Grant has quoted studies that have shown a high percentage of artists are able to support themselves through their art and related skills—often flying in the face of preconceived notions about an arts education. What’s more, these studies have revealed artists to be happier with their lives than many others in higher-paying professions, at least in part because of their autonomous decision-making.

“A growing number of artists are looking at galleries as just one part—or, perhaps, not even a part at all—of their plans to show and sell work,” he said. “These artists are aware that they can speak for their art better than any third party and that, in fact, many collectors are eager to speak with the artists directly rather than with a gallery owner.”

Grant is the author of books including The Business of Being an Artist, Selling Art Without Galleries, and The Fine Artist’s Career Guide. He will take questions from the audience on all facets of being an artist or acquiring art. His books will be available for sale and autograph during the reception following the lecture.

The Leibman Lecture is a joint project of IU’s Kelley School of Business, the Robert
H. McKinney School of Law and Herron School of Art and Design—all on the campus of IUPUI. Past Leibman Lecture topics have ranged from The Art of The Steal
and The Monuments Men to U.S. Department of Treasury engraving practices and
wearable intellectual property.

Parking: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up.

Art 21 Season 7 Screenings

Leonardo Drew. Number 77, 2000. Found objects, paper, paint, and wood; 168 x 672 x 58 inches. Installation view: Directions: Leonardo Drew, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, 2000. Photo: Ansen Seale. Courtesy the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. © Leonardo Drew.

Leonardo Drew. Number 77, 2000. Found objects, paper, paint, and wood; 168 x 672 x 58 inches. Installation view: Directions: Leonardo Drew, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, 2000. Photo: Ansen Seale. Courtesy the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. © Leonardo Drew.

Herron School of Art and Design is proud to partner with PBS and Art 21 to once again provide screenings of some the upcoming episodes of the new season of Art in the 21st Century.

On Wednesday, October 22 we will screen Investigation and Secrets and on October 29 we will screen Legacy. Both screenings will start at 6:00 p.m.

The screenings are FREE and open to the public.

Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up.

Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.