More Hospitals Use the Healing Powers of Public Art

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Researchers are learning more about the precise ways paintings and other works of art help patients and families in the healing process. With studies showing a direct link between the content of images and the brain’s reaction to pain, stress, and anxiety, hospitals are considering and choosing artworks based on the evidence and giving it a higher priority than merely decoration for sterile rooms and corridors.

“These are not just accoutrements or aesthetics anymore,” says Lisa Harris, a nephrologist and chief executive of Eskenazi Health, affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

With a $1.5 million budget from donors, she says, the health system commissioned 19 artists to create original works to support “the sense of optimism, vitality and energy” for the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital, which opened last December. “This is right down the fairway of what we need to be doing to promote health,” Dr. Harris says.

“Paths Crossed,” by Maine artist Aaron T. Stephan, is a large, spiraling wooden sculpture composed of six intertwined ladders suspended from the ceiling in the hospital’s two-story main concourse.

To Dr. Harris, it is a visual representation of the hospital’s approach to care, with “lives intertwined as we go from health to sickness and back to health again,” she says. People have reacted differently, she notes. “Some see it as DNA, and some see it as a roller coaster.”

Anne Berry, 81, says, “It makes me think of flying.” She visits the hospital for procedures and tests such as a mammogram and always takes time to look at the artworks. She has “white coat syndrome,” which makes her nervous about going to a doctor, but she says, “I have found the art and the environment at Eskenazi makes it less stress-inducing for me.”

Close to half of hospitals have arts programs, which include art therapy classes and musical performances, according to a 2009 report from the Society for Arts in Healthcare, now known as the Arts & Health Alliance.

Permanent art displays are most prevalent, and the trend continues to grow, says Steven Libman, outgoing executive director and now a consultant for the nonprofit.

Though many hospitals are in a budget crunch, funds for art are often provided by philanthropy, or built into construction budgets of new facilities.

For help with choosing art works, consultants, hospital curators and art committees turn to studies such as those gathered in the nonprofit Center for Health Design’s “Guide to Evidence-Based Art.”

Research suggests patients are positively affected by nature themes and figurative art with unambiguous, positive faces that convey a sense of security and safety.

Some studies have found that patients are likely to respond negatively to art with negative images or icons. Abstract art also often rates low in patient preferences compared with representational art.

One 1993 study found that patients exposed to a nature image experienced less postoperative anxiety and were more likely to switch to weaker painkillers than those who viewed an abstract image or no image.

A 2011 study found that nature images helped calm restless behavior and noise levels in two Texas emergency department waiting rooms.

A 2012 review of neuroscience studies published in the Health Environments Research & Design Journal found that images of fearful or angry faces, ambiguous subject matter, high novelty and unfamiliarity, lack of realism and sharp contours elicit negative emotional responses in the brain and suggested they should be avoided.

Hospitals aren’t shying away from art whose content is open to interpretation or might make patients reflect. In the spring 2014 issue of the same journal, the Cleveland Clinic reported that patients surveyed on its contemporary collection—which includes abstract and nonrepresentational imagery by some prominent artists—reported a significant positive effect on their experience and on mood, stress, comfort and expectations.

The study suggested patients may respond positively to the diversity of the collection and to other types of art in addition to nature art.

Still, says Iva Fattorini, a dermatologist and global chairwoman of the Cleveland Clinic’s Arts & Medicine Institute, the focus is on art that is “not disturbing, but uplifting and diverse.” The aim “is to take your mind away from the disease and replace the time you are losing inside hospital with some beauty.”

Some patients in its survey reported they were motivated to get out of bed to view the artwork. Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder reported the most significant positive improvement in mood.

One popular piece is “Mike Kelley 1″ by artist Jennifer Steinkamp; an illuminated video installation of a large tree that cycles through the seasons, changing color and moving as if in a breeze.

Heather Kreinbrink says when her daughter Allison had a stroke at age 12 in 2010 and was hospitalized for a week, she and her husband, Rod, found looking at the installation outside the children’s wing provided a sense of calm amid their fear and exhaustion.

“It ended up being something we would go to every day for peace and to come to terms with what was happening,” she says.

When Allison was discharged, her parents brought her to see it. “It made me think as I saw other kids being pushed in wheelchairs by their parents, how awesome it is to be able to have something like that to take your mind of everything you are going through,” says Allison, now 16. Each year when she returns for a checkup, she poses for a picture in front of the tree.

Jeffrey Rothenberg, an obstetrician and gynecologist and chief medical officer at Indiana University Health’s University Hospital, says he learned to make glass art himself as a stress reliever. He is chairman of a public art committee for Indiana University School of Medicine’s Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute that called on artists with ties to Indiana to create works for a building devoted to vision.

“People sent in a lot of great pictures, but some of them were blurry or misty mornings”—not the best visuals, Dr. Rothenberg says, for “people getting their eyes dilated so they can’t see.”

The committee has chosen a range of works aimed at promoting healing and providing comfort, mostly purchased and some donated after the works were selected, including a glass wall sculpture and mobile by Dr. Rothenberg that he donated. Images in health-care settings shouldn’t be shocking, Dr. Rothenberg says, yet “at the same time you don’t want something so boring and generic that people walk away.”

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., chooses art to create a “healing environment,” says Chrysanthe Yates, director of its Lyndra P. Daniel Center for Humanities in Medicine.

Despite artistic merit, not all works fit the bill. For example, the hospital passed on an option to display a show of works about the Vietnam War, “which were beautiful but very stark and for obvious reasons not appropriate,” she says.

Mayo also exhibits pieces on loan from Jacksonville’s Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens. The institutions are collaborating on a program for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients and their caregivers, who meet at the museum for conversations about art works as a means of soothing and relieving stress. A research study is planned to measure those effects.

Write to Laura Landro at laura.landro@wsj.com

 

Herron alumnus’ paint hits the wall at Clowes and in exhibit at his alma mater

406081_w296INDIANAPOLIS — An upcoming solo exhibit at Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI includes a multimedia chronicle of the making of the “jaw-dropping” monumental painting going on display at Clowes Memorial Hall.

The Herron show, “The Moment of Conception?” features the work of Herron alumnus and Clowes artist-in-residence Phil O’Malley and runs Aug. 29 to Sept. 19 in the Marsh Gallery of Herron School of Art and Design, 735 W. New York St., on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The Herron show is a companion exhibit to O’Malley’s “Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder,”the 40-foot-tall by 20-foot-wide wall art that will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall, on the Butler University campus. The painting is available for public viewing during regular business hours for two years, beginning today.

“‘Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder,’ is the apex to my series of paintings known as ‘Deep Down,’” O’Malley said. “This series consists of paintings that are individual abstract visual representations of that amazing personal journey one experiences by going deep down inside to find the strength or the courage that it takes to accomplish something, get through something, or grow beyond something.

“Going deep down into all that muck, chaos and confusion can be an intimidating endeavor, but when we do, that journey can be beautifully awakening to yield incredible growth,” O’Malley said of personal experiences captured in “Finding Your Way” and other “Deep Down” pieces.

O’Malley earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Herron. He also studied interior design in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

His “Deep Down” series was spurred by selections of popular music from his formative years, translated via paint into vivid visual representations, the artist said.

Three videos chronicling the making of the Clowes painting will play continuously as part of the Herron show. The Clowes wall project is also being documented by local PBS station WFYI.

The Herron show also includes a sculpture, timeline sketches and drawings of parts of the painting. Herron alumni artists C. J. Martin, Naylor Musko and Steve Smolinski assisted with professional art production for the exhibit co-curated by O’Malley and Martin.

O’Malley created “Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder” on the stage at Clowes Hall with the support of the Clowes staff. Martin and Musko also were assistants on the Clowes project.

“We used 800 square feet of canvas, 20 gallons of acrylic primer and one dozen gallons of oil paints,” O’Malley said.

“The process included poured paint, sprayed paint, squirted paint, drawn paint, mopped paint and even some brushed paint. At times the canvas was tied on a batten and flown in (onto the stage) and flown back out (off stage) to assist with the application and flow of the paint.”

The result is “jaw dropping” both in terms of the sheer scale of the canvas and O’Malley’s “inventiveness to start with small sketches and synthesize and scale up and adapt to the viewer’s experience of the work from different angles and levels,” said Glennda McGann, Herron’s assistant dean of development and external affairs.

“This is a prime example of an artist’s ability to problem solve,” McGann said. “He even had to collaborate with crew members and invent a way to hang this huge painting.”

O’Malley estimates he has spent about 500 hours making both the Clowes piece and the art for the Herron exhibit.

Herron Galleries host reception Friday, August 29

250px-HerronSoAA public reception will celebrate the beginning of the new academic year and the three shows filling the galleries at Herron School of Art and Design on Friday, August 29 from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Continuing through September 10th in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries is the 2014 Faculty Exhibition. This year’s exhibition is an exercise in eclecticism with faculty members exhibiting from a variety of departments. All tenured and tenure-track faculty, lecturers and program technicians were invited to participate

The Moment of Conception? is in the Marsh Gallery through September 19th. Phil O’Malley, B.F.A. ’07, has planned a “making of” exhibition, The Moment of Conception?, as a companion to the mid-August unveiling of his, 20’ x 40’ Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder, a monumental installation which will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall. The work is the pinnacle creation in a series called Deep Down. Its creation and installation is also being documented by local National Public Broadcast Service station, WFYI.

Katie Hudnall’s exhibition of current work, in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery through September 19th, blurs the lines between woodworking and furniture techniques and media and those of sculpture and drawing in a search for new and compelling ways to reach the audiences for these forms.

“The language of furniture, and of utilitarian objects in general, has greatly influenced these hybrids as I search for ways to directly interact with my viewers,” Hudnall said.

Midwest meadows, Madrid, mapping influence October Herron exhibitions

UntitledBerkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries
Shawn Decker Prairie

Positioned at the intersection of music composition, visual art and performance, Chicago Artist Shawn Decker’s work uses physical and electronic media to investigate the natural and unnatural world.

By way of its most recent stop in Austria, his work Prairie will arrive at Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries with an opening artists talk and reception on September 26 beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Prairie is a large-scale kinetic sound sculpture. This installation presents visual elements that mimic prairie grasses as well as sound elements that evoke sounds of the prairie—from insects to wind playing in the grasses. The irony of a human construction with digital programming that ends up producing a meditative, seemingly natural environment is not lost on the artist.

Basile Auditorium
Artists Talk: Shawn Decker and Lanny Silverman

Joining Decker for a discussion of the current state of contemporary and avant garde art forms will be independent curator Lanny Silverman, formerly curator of exhibitions for the Chicago Cultural Center Department of Cultural Affairs.

Marsh Gallery
Lost in Translation:
Student Work from Herron’s Summer Study Abroad Program in Spain

Professors Anila Agha and Stefan Petranek not only conducted a summer scholarly excursion to Spain, the two will curate a showcase of student sculptures, drawings and photographs compelled by student travel experiences in Madrid and Barcelona. Some of the works were exhibited at the Makers of Barcelona gallery in June 2014, but this exhibit will include work created since the students’ return. Participating artists are: Helen ArthBrianna Campbell,Devan HimstedtJessica KartawichCarolyn KypchikChristine (Jazz) LongMary McClungEvan RiceBrittany Rudolf andHadia Shaikh.

Basile Gallery
Reagan Furqueron

A solo exhibition will feature new works by Director of Foundation Studies and Assistant Professor Reagan Furqueron that explore the ideas of transition and mapping through a sculptural approach to making—a departure from Furqueron’s usual making mode.

Fellowship Opportunities at the Huntington

huntington logoHuntington Fellowships

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

                                               Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

 The Huntington, an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine, maintains a collection of manuscripts that date from the eleventh century up to the present. This collection includes 7 million manuscripts, 420,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Special collections include those on the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence. Applicants can apply for only a short-term or long-term award during this fellowship cycle. Applicants may also submit an application for a travel grant or exchange fellowship, but they must provide a separate application with distinct cover sheet and project description, as these awards are reviewed by a separate committee.

Huntington Fellowship

The Huntington Fellowships provides doctoral level scholars or graduate students who have reached the dissertation phase $3,000 per month for one to five months between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. The majority of these awards will be given to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library, though there are specialized fellowships available including the Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England; the Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas; the Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering ; the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships; and the Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships
These fellowships provide $50,000 over a nine to twelve month fellowship between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 for U.S. scholars who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain
The Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships provide for a U.S. based scholar who holds a PhD or equivalent or is a doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage travel to England, Scotland, or Wales between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. In addition to research that will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain, the Huntington also offers exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Terms for the exchange fellowships and travel grants are as follows:

1. Linacre College, Oxford – A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2015; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

2. Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall – Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

3. Travel Grants – The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2015, and no later than June 30, 2016.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
This fellowship is for nine to twelve months with a stipend of $50,000 between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. This fellowship will support individuals who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014.

Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art at Yale University offers funding for book illustrations

thPublication Grants (Author)
Sponsored by Yale University, the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA), and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art – U.K., this grant provides up to £3,000GBP annually in order to cover costs which are the responsibility of the author and are personally expended by him/her. Eligible costs include specific photography and the production of images for their publication, acquisition of images, reproduction and copyright costs, or the production of graphics. Funds may not be used to cover publishers’ production costs or personal living expenses, travel, nor the support of research on the part of the applicant. Supported topics must have an historical perspective and pertain to topics in the realm of academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present.

The Paul Mellon Centre, an educational charity, supports scholarly publications, in both printed and online form, within the remit of British art and architectural history, as well as books and catalogs of exhibitions or permanent collections of British fine and decorative arts and architecture. It does not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. It has no discretionary funds outside its stated program. Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2015. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2014.

Authors and Editors of books which have been accepted for publication for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press are not eligible to apply for further support through the Publication Grant (Author) award scheme.

An application made by an author or editor will not disbar their publisher from applying for a Publication Grant (Publisher) for the production costs of the same project.

Click here for more information.

Demonstrating extraordinary generosity through legacy gifts

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Alumna Doris J. Brinkman (1950s) remembered Herron in her estate plans Image Herron staff

Ordinary people are demonstrating extraordinary generosity by leaving legacy gifts to Herron in their wills and estate plans. Each of their stories represents something important to them. Because of their commitment to Herron’s mission, their priorities will continue, and their gifts will remind us that we, too, can make a difference in the lives that follow.

 

Read about some of Herron’s friends and alumni who have done just that:

Ruth Lilly
Robert B. Berkshire
Doris Brinkman
Harry and James Esamann
Frank and Katrina Basile
Edith Moore

How do you get started?

Think beyond cash gifts made today. Options include a simple directive in your will or naming Herron as a beneficiary of your life insurance, pension plan, IRA or trust. Click here for bequest language.

As a professional school of Indiana University, Herron works closely with the IU Foundation as it stewards and maintains your gift. To learn more about other types of gifts and various ways to give visit IUF’s website.

Have you already remembered Herron in your plans?

Perhaps you have already remembered Herron in your will or estate plans. If so, we invite you to notify Herron’s Office of Development so that we can celebrate with you. We can help document your gift to help ensure your intentions are carried out in the future.

As always, your support may be given anonymously, if you prefer. Simply notify Herron’s development staff about your philanthropic plans.

Want to learn more?

Herron’s staff and faculty look forward to learning about your philanthropic plans today so that your generosity can be recognized during your lifetime. To learn more about leaving a legacy at Herron School of Art and Design, contact Kim Hodges at (317) 278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu or Glennda McGann at (317) 278-9477 or gmmcgann@iupui.edu

IU units can display art from university collection

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“Untitled Triptych” by Betty C. Boyle, hangs in the office of IU’s associate vice president for marketing, Rob Zinkan. The watercolor painting is part of the university’s campus art collection. | Photo By Marjorie Richards

Most Americans spend the majority of their waking hours at work, so why not spend those hours in a space that inspires?

IU employees from all campuses can do just that by working with the university’s campus art curators to turn blank walls and empty corridors into beautiful conversation pieces.

Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art, and Katie Chattin, assistant curator of campus art, oversee IU’s Campus Art Collection, which includes all public art on IU campuses not displayed in museums, as well as hundreds of paintings, sculptures, drawings, textiles and more currently hidden away in storage.

Rouse said IU units willing to invest some money in bringing the artwork up to display quality can showcase world-class pieces specifically chosen to meet the needs of their campus spaces.

“Decorating isn’t what we do,” said Rouse, who explained she works hard to match clients with art they not only enjoy, but that is also appropriate for the location. A number of environmental factors, such as sunlight and accessibility, go into each decision, she said. Ultimately, it’s about what’s best for the art.

“I don’t hang artwork over drinking fountains,” Rouse said with a laugh.

Recent clients of Rouse include leaders of IU Communications’ Bloomington team, Rob Zinkan, IU’s associate vice president for marketing, and Tim Keller, director of Creative Services. Zinkan and Keller worked with Rouse to install three hanging sculptures and one painting at the unit’s office in the historic Von Lee building, along Kirkwood Avenue.

Zinkan, who first used IU’s campus art collection years ago at IUPUC, said overall employee feedback on the new office artwork has been very positive.

“We have a great team of creative professionals, so we wanted to have an environment that inspires great creative work,” he said.

Rouse said she was pleased too — especially about finding a home for three Morton C. Bradley sculptures, of which the university has more than 300 in storage.

“It’s obvious that (IU Communications employees) are clearly stimulated by what happened there,” she said.

Though salvage fees vary depending on each work of art, they are typically a fraction of the total value of the piece, Rouse said. For example, one might be able to display an $800 painting after paying only $100 for a new frame and installation by campus carpenters.

Once installation is complete, Rouse and her team are in charge of maintaining the pieces. Only the university’s art curators and campus carpenters are authorized to touch and move the pieces, so future plans for the artwork will always need to be vetted through them.

Those interested in displaying some of IU’s campus art collection in their campus buildings – particularly ones with public spaces – should contact Katie Chattin at kchattin@iupui.edu or 812-855-5360 to set up a consultation.

by Andrea Zeek

 

Explore IUPUI’s public art collection

sculpture5_iIUPUI’s public art collection is high in quality and vast in subject matter. It includes sculptures from world-renowned artists such as Dale Chihuly and John Torreano, but is also privileged to feature artwork by IUPUI alumni.

As home to the only professional, accredited school of art in Indiana, the Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI has access to a large community of creative and talented students. Their work can be seen throughout IUPUI’s public art collection. In the cooperative nature of public art, IUPUI has enabled students past and present to take part in the development of the campus’s public identity through these outdoor sculptures.

IUPUI’s public art collection functions not only to create points of interest, but also to provide students and the public with spaces to come together, have meaningful conversations and take part in campus life.

A fun way to start exploring public art at IUPUI is by visiting the Indianapolis Public Art website, which allows users to plan a public art walking tour through campus and the greater Indianapolis area.

This photo gallery is a small sample of a larger collection consisting of more than 30 works of sculpture located throughout the IUPUI campus. For more information, visit Wikipedia’s IUPUI Public Art Collection page, a project by an IUPUI Museum Studies class to promote research and conservation of the outdoor sculptures on campus.

by Emma Hernandez

Herron School of Art and Design faculty, alumni to strut their stuff in August

Sax on the Rocks 12x12 oil canvas

Phil O’Malley,      Sax on the Rocks,  Oil on Canvas,      12” x 12”

The Biennial Faculty Show will kick off the fall gallery season at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s main galleries. This year’s exhibition will be an exercise in eclecticism with faculty members exhibiting from a variety of departments. All tenured and tenure-track faculty, lecturers and program technicians were invited to participate.

Also opening in the Marsh Gallery August 1 is Print or Die an annual print exchange created and curated by Dominic Senibaldi (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2013). Print or Die will showcase works from two years of the exchange, and illustrate the ideas behind the print exchange culture and its importance in contemporary printmaking. Artists from coast to coast participate.

In the Basile Gallery, also opening August 1, is 316: A Thesis Exhibition by Eric D. Johnson (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2014). Johnson describes the concept for the exhibition as emerging from strain on the support systems of the modern world caused by mass production, consumption and waste, and observation of critical tipping points and cascading failures.

Works will be available for purchase on opening night.

Rounding out the month, opening on August 29 and continuing through September 19, will be solo shows by alumnus Phil O’Malley (B.F.A., ‘07) in the Marsh Gallery and Assistant Professor in Furniture Design Katie Hudnall in the Basile Gallery.

O’Malley has planned a “making of” exhibition, The Moment of Conception?, as a companion to the mid-August unveiling of his, 20’ x 40’ as yet untitled work, a monumental installation which will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall. The work is the pinnacle creation in a series called Deep Down. Its creation and installation is also being documented by local National Public Broadcast Service station, WFYI. O’Malley said the series was spurred by “several selections of popular music” from his formative years, translated via paint into vivid visual representations. “Now they’re laid out, varnished, nailed to their boards,” he said, “and placed in their four-sided coffins for their viewing. We’re so sorry, Uncle Albert.”

Hudnall’s exhibition of current work blurs the lines between woodworking and furniture techniques and media and those of sculpture and drawing in a search for new and compelling ways to reach the audiences for these forms.

“The language of furniture, and of utilitarian objects in general, has greatly influenced these hybrids as I search for ways to directly interact with my viewers,” Hudnall said. “In the newest work, an interactive element is integral to experiencing the piece. The viewer might open and close a door, or a drawer might activate another section of the work, revealing intricate drawings that open like books, or umbrella-like forms that raise and lower out of the top of the piece. This exhibition raises questions about the notion of communication. Viewers may work together to operate a piece, making it something that a single viewer cannot fully experience on their own.”