Tag Archive for art

Lecture: Rachel Armstrong: “The Technology of Nature”

Rachel Armstrong

October 30
Indianapolis Museum of Art
DeBoest Lecture Hall
7-8pm
Co-sponsored by the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Tickets are free to the public. Please order using the form below. 

Rachel Armstrong is Co-Director of AVATAR (Advanced Virtual and Technological Architectural Research) in Architecture & Synthetic Biology at The School of Architecture & Construction, University of Greenwich, London. Senior TED Fellow, and Visiting Research Assistant at the Centre for Fundamental Living Technology, Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark. Rachel is a sustainability innovator who investigates a new approach to building materials called ‘living architecture,’ that suggests it is possible for our buildings to share some of the properties of living systems. She works collaboratively across disciplines to build and develop prototypes that embody her approach.

Dr. Armstrong designs sustainable solutions for the built and natural environment using advanced new technologies such as, Synthetic Biology – the engineering of living systems – and smart chemistry. Her research prompts a reevaluation of how we think about our homes and cities and raises questions about the urban environment of the future. She creates open innovation platforms for academia and industry to address environmental challenges such as carbon capture & recycling, smart ‘living’ materials and sustainable design.

Her award winning research underpins her bold approach to the way that she challenges perceptions, presumptions and established principles related to scientific concepts and the building blocks of life and society. She embodies and promotes new transferrable ways of thinking ‘outside of the box’ and enables others to also develop innovative environmental solutions.

 

National Art Education Foundation (NAEF) Grant

NAEA logo

The National Art Education Foundation invites proposals to support research in art education that advances knowledge in the field of art education and that promulgates the goals outlined in Creating a Visual Arts Research Agenda Toward the 21st Century. Funds are awarded to selected art educators whose proposals specifically focus on issues relating to one of the recommendations identified in this document. NAEF invites proposals to support research in art education that advances knowledge in the field of art education. Grants are awarded to art educators to pursue a broad range of research topics that are aligned with the NAEA Strategic Goals: advocacy, learning, research and knowledge, and organizational vibrancy. NAEF encourages the submissions of proposals that conduct research that supports the impact and importance of arts education in student learning and provides hard data to support the findings of the research. Eligible applicants are welcome to submit proposals in all areas of research. In addition, as part of NAEF’s collaboration with the NAEA Research Commission, NAEF encourages submissions of the following proposals: – Proposals that support the creation of communities of learners, including both researchers and practitioners, working together to explore a research question and/or project. – Proposals that support the identification of best practice and research that leads to further understanding of the impact and importance of arts education to student learning in and through the visual arts in a variety of settings, with an interest in research that provides quantitative data to support its findings.

For more information see
http://www.arteducators.org/grants/national-art-education-foundation

Alison Bechdel, Graphic Artist and Novelist, to Speak in Indianapolis

Alison Bechdel

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Lecture Series and The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series present:

Alison Bechdel

February 28, 2013; Dean and Barbara White Auditorium, Indiana State Museum; 7:00 pm

Tickets: free to the public; available here

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series, Office for Women, Office of Housing and Residence Life, Office of Student Involvement, IUPUI Women’s Studies Program, IUPUI Department of English, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

Alison Bechdel is the creator of the long running comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For.  Judith Levine in Ms. Magazine called Bechdel’s work, “one of the preeminent oeuvres in the comics genre, period.”  In 2008, Dwight Garner of the New York Times reported that the weekly comic strip, published for over 20 years, “has been as important to new generations of lesbians as landmark novels like Rita Mae Brown’s “Rubyfruit Jungle” (1973) and Lisa Alther’s “Kinflicks” (1976) were to an earlier one.”

In 2006, Bechdel published the graphic memoir Fun Home, hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by numerous sources, including The New York Times, amazon.com, The Times of LondonPublishers Weekly, salon.com, New York magazine, and Entertainment WeeklyTime named it the best book of 2006, calling it ”a stunning memoir about a girl growing up in a small town with her cryptic, perfectionist dad and slowly realizing that a) she is gay and b) he is too. … Bechdel’s breathtakingly smart commentary duets with eloquent line drawings. Forget genre and sexual orientation: this is a masterpiece about two people who live in the same house but different worlds, and their mysterious debts to each other.” Fun Home was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award in the memoir/autobiography category.

Bechdel released her second graphic memoir, Are You My Mother?, in May 2012.  Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated called the book “a work of the most humane kind of genius, bravely going right to the heart of things: why we are who we are. It’s also incredibly funny. And visually stunning. And page-turningly addictive. And heartbreaking.”

In her work, Bechdel is preoccupied with the overlap of the political and the personal spheres. Dykes to Watch Out For was an explicitly community-based and politically engaged project. But in her deeply intimate memoirs about her father’s life before the gay rights movement and her mother’s life before the women’s movement, she turns a microscopic lens on the internal mechanisms of oppression and liberation.

Bechdel edited Best American Comics 2011. She has drawn comics for Slate, McSweeney’s, Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times Book Review, and Granta. Her work is widely anthologized and translated.

In the spring of 2012, Bechdel was a Mellon Residential Fellow for Arts and Practice at the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center at the University of Chicago. She is also the recipient of a 2012-13 Guggenheim Fellowship.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute was founded in 2012. Its mission is two-fold. First, it serves as a liaison between IUPUI and the greater Indianapolis community, supporting collaborations and running public programs such as lectures and performances. Secondly, it fosters interdisciplinary faculty research and creative activity in the arts and humanities at IUPUI.

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series is presented by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. It was founded in 1997 in honor of former English Department chair Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The Series annually brings national and regional writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

 

Art, Race, Space Symposium on 25 January 2013 at IUPUI

Art, Space, and Race Conference

Art, Race, Space Symposium

 

Date: January 25, 2013

Location: Campus Center, IUPUI Campus, 420 University Blvd.

Time: 8:00 am–5:30 pm

 

Artists and scholars from across the country will join leaders from Indianapolis’s arts and culture sector in an interdisciplinary daylong symposium dedicated to exploring the complicated relationships between art, race, and civic space.  Participants will begin by reflecting on artist Fred Wilson’s E Pluribus Unum, a public art commission for the Indianapolis Culture Trail that was cancelled in 2011 due to controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Building on the ideas about race, class, visual culture, and democratic debate that emerge from the Indianapolis project, presenters will also address related historical and contemporary examples from other parts of the United States.  In order to encourage public dialogue about art, race, and space, the symposium will provide an opportunity for audience members and presenters to engage in conversations about these matters throughout the day.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the IUPUI Museum Studies Program and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Campus maps and parking information.