Tag Archive for anthropology

IUPUI faculty and students help FBI identify cultural artifacts

larry zimmerman

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis anthropology and museum studies faculty and students are assisting the FBI in identifying and preserving cultural artifacts found in the home of a Rush County, Ind., man.

The FBI and its multidisciplinary team are working on repatriating items of cultural patrimony.

Larry J. Zimmerman, professor of anthropology and museum studies; Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies; and Charmayne “Charli” Champion-Shaw, director of the Office of America Indian Programs at IUPUI, are among the art, cultural and museum experts working as consultants at the site about 35 miles southeast of Indianapolis.

“Our job is to assist the FBI in the identification of artifacts, help as liaisons with Native Americans and take care of the artifacts in keeping with best museum practices and FBI evidential procedures,” Zimmerman said. Zimmerman also holds the title of Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a shared position with the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.

Students and alumni of museum studies classes taught by Cusack-McVeigh, also Public Scholar of Collections and Community Curation, are helping to handle the artifacts as they are registered, photographed and packaged.

The IUPUI faculty and students participated in an FBI briefing April 1 and a press conference April 2 about the matter. At this time, the IUPUI professors and students are not available for additional media interviews.

“Solving the Mystery of Australia’s African coins”: a conversation with members of the Past Masters team

African coin
Monday April 7, 2014
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
IUPUI ES2132 Global Crossroads
902 W. New York Street, Indianapolis

In 1944, five coins from the medieval Sultanate of Kilwa in present day Tanzania were found on the north Australian coast. These rare coins have only been found outside of East Africa on two occasions (one in the ruins of Great Zimbabwe and another in Oman). How they travelled 8,000km to a remote island in north-east Arnhem Land was the subject of a multidisciplinary expedition in July 2013. Come and learn what was discovered by the Past Masters and also the next steps in unravelling the mystery.

Dr. Ian McIntosh is an adjunct professor of anthropology in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and author of many publications on the Yolngu of north-east Arnhem Land.

Michael Hermes, an expert in Indigenous cultural resource management, specializes in training Aboriginal cultural heritage officers.

Dr. Tim Stone is a specialist on the geomorphology of the northern Australian coastline with 30 years of experience with Aboriginal Australians and is best known for his work on what constitutes an archaeological site.

For more information, contact Ian McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu or 317 2743776

Historic Deerfield, Inc. 2014 Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Early American History and Material Culture

deerfield logo

Historic Deerfield, Inc. invites applications for an intensive Summer Fellowship Program in History and Material Culture in Deerfield, MA. Undergraduates enrolled as either juniors or seniors as of January 1, 2014 are eligible for 7 openings in the program, which is designed for students in American Studies, Architecture, Archeology, Art and Art History, Design, History, Material Culture, Preservation and Museum Studies. Each participant receives a full fellowship that covers all expenses associated with the program, including tuition, room and board, and field trips. Limited stipends are available for students with demonstrated need to help cover lost summer income.

Summer Fellows:

  • Live in the historic village
  • Explore history and material culture studies in hands-on classroom seminars, walking tours and room studies with Historic Deerfield staff and visiting lecturers
  • Learn to guide and interpret in Historic Deerfield’s furnished museum houses
  • Conduct original research on New England history and material culture
  • using museum and library collections
  • Go on behind-the-scenes visits to historic sites in New England and take a week-long road trip to museums in the mid-Atlantic and Virginia

Program dates: June 9-August 10, 2014.

Application deadline: February 7, 2014.

Applications are accepted online 

Contact: Barbara A. Mathews Phone: (413) 775-7207; email: bmathews@historic-deerfield.org

Lecture: James F. Brooks, “Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest”

James Brooks

Dr. James F. Brooks, Research Fellow, School for Advanced Research
“Women, Men, and Evangelism in the American Southwest” 

October 17
IUPUI Campus Center Room 409
7-8pm
Support provided by the IUPUI Department of History

Tickets available for free here: https://jamesbrooks.eventbrite.com

James F. Brooks is an American historian whose work on slavery, captivity and kinship in the Southwest Borderlands has been honored with several major national awards, including he Bancroft Prize, the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize and the Frederick Douglass Prize.  He is former President of the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

An interdisciplinary scholar of the indigenous and colonial past, he has held professorial appointments at the University of Maryland, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Berkeley, as well as fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and in 2000–2001, at the SAR itself. The recipient of more than a dozen national awards for scholarly excellence, his 2002 book Captives & Cousins: Slavery, Kinship and Community in the Southwest Borderlands focused on the traffic in women and children across the region as expressions of intercultural violence and accommodation. He extends these questions most recently through an essay on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Pampas borderlands of Argentina in his co-edited advanced seminar volume Small Worlds: Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory from SAR Press.