Reception and Lecture | “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab” by Marianne Boruch on Oct. 30

Cadaver SpeakMarianne Boruch, “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab”
October 30, 2014
Reception: 6:00, Performance: 7:00-8:30
IUPUI Emerson Hall, Auditorium, EH 304
545 Barnhill Dr.

Some books begin as a dare to the self. Marianne Boruch’s newest collection, Cadaver, Speak, is an unsettling double, a heart of two chambers. The first half is attuned to history — how time hits us, and grief — and to art and its making. The second half, the title sequence, is spoken by a ninety-nine-year-old who donated her body for dissection by medical students, a laboratory experience in which the poet, duly silenced, was privileged to take part. Born from lyric impulse, which is Boruch’s scalpel, her work examines love, death, beauty, and knowledge—the great subjects of poetry made new by a riveting reimagining.

Marianne Boruch was born in Chicago in 1950. She is the author of seven collections of poetry including The Book of Hours (Copper Canyon Press, 2011), two volumes of essays on poetry, and a memoir. After receiving her MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she founded the MFA program at Purdue University in 1987. In addition to teaching at Purdue University, she also teaches at the low-residency MFA program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. Her recent awards include the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award (2013), and a Fulbright/Visiting professorship at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Literature and Medicine Student Interest Group and the Department of Anatomy (IU School of Medicine), the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program, and the Department of English (IU School of Liberal Arts).

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from 16th-19th century

Wednesday February 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Van Nuys Medical Science Bldg.
Room 122A

Domenico Bertoloni-Meli, Ph.D., Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Indiana University presents “Visualizing Disease: Pathological Illustrations from the 16th to the 19th Century.”

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from the 16th century to the first half of the 19th century, in the period from the first representations of remarkable cases to the first comprehensive treatises with color images of diseases affecting the entire human body. The talk will illustrate and discuss the lesions found in the dissected bodies of dead patients at postmortems, and skin diseases on live patients, which played an important role in the history of pathological illustrations more generally.

Presented by the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Seminar Series. Free and open to the public. Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu.