Richard Lugar to headline Bulen Symposium examining impact of midterm elections

Richard Lugar

Richard Lugar

Former U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar will headline the 2014 Bulen Symposium on American Politics at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

The symposium will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14, in Room 450 of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. It is presented by the Department of Political Science in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Lugar, distinguished scholar and professor of practice at the IU Bloomington School of Global and International Studies, will join a roster of academics, media and political party representatives to examine the impact of midterm election results, including the presidential agenda for the next two years and the 2016 race for the White House.

“Senator Lugar is one of the most respected politicians of the last half century, not just in Indiana but across the country,” said professor Aaron Dusso, co-chair of the symposium. “Any opportunity to hear him speak in our hometown of Indianapolis is a wonderful thing. We like to think of the Bulen Symposium as one of Indiana’s premier post-election discussion forums and believe there are few people who can bring as much insight to the process as Senator Lugar.”

Midterm congressional elections are traditionally viewed as a referendum of the sitting president.  With the Senate potentially up for grabs and the 2016 presidential election lurking around the corner, the implications of this November’s elections can hardly be understated.

In addition to Lugar, panelists who will assess the impact of the November midterm elections include:

  • Tim Berry, chairman, Indiana Republican Party
  • John Zody, chairman, Indiana Democratic Party
  • Tony Cook, Statehouse reporter, The Indianapolis Star
  • Amber Stearns, news editor, Nuvo
  • Lesley Weidenbener, executive editor, The Statehouse File
  • Jeffery Mondak,  professor of political science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Edward Burmila, assistant professor of political science, Bradley University

“When putting together the Bulen program, we focus on bringing together as many different perspectives on the process as possible,” Dusso said.

Lugar, who will present the symposium’s afternoon keynote, spent 36 years in the United States Senate, where he focused on issues such as nuclear non-proliferation, energy, agriculture and free trade. Before being elected to the Senate, Lugar was a two-term Indianapolis mayor. He is currently the president of the Lugar Center, a nonprofit organization that continues the work he focused on in the Senate.

The Bulen Symposium on American Politics is named for L. Keith Bulen, who personified political leadership in Indiana and beyond for three decades. He served twice in elective office and served three presidents in major appointive posts. Bulen is best remembered for his innovative management of major political campaigns, his leadership in revitalizing the Indiana Republican Party and his unwavering commitment to the American two-party framework.

For the symposium event schedule and further information visit the symposium website.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required by Nov. 12.

Spirit and Place Festival explores life’s journey

imagesLife’s journey is filled with movement and meaning, but this Nov. 7 to 16, “Journey” also is the theme of a quest for thousands of curious people during the 2014 Spirit & Place Festival in Indianapolis.

The 19th annual festival will explore the various aspects of “Journey” in nearly 40 events scattered throughout the city, focusing on the impact of such topics as immigration, incarceration, marriage and dozens of others, all led by partnerships linking various civic, cultural and religious groups.

Spirit & Place was created 19 years ago by The Polis Center at IUPUI to engage the city’s population in unique conversations about each year’s festival theme.

This year, individual events will study life’s journey, all leading to the annual festival finale: the public conversation. This year’s event will feature renowned authors Gail Sheehy and Mark Nepo and Dr. Timothy Quill and focus on the “Journey’s End” at 4 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Christian Theological Seminary’s Shelton Auditorium.

All three are linked by loss and the quality of one’s end of life. Sheehy, the author of “Passages,” cared for her husband in the last stages of his life. Nepo is a two-time cancer survivor, and is scheduled to tour with television host Oprah Winfrey to discuss his perspectives on the importance of palliative care. Quill is the director of the Center for Ethics, Humanities and Palliative Care at the University of Rochester School of Medicine.

The three also will participate in the Mary Margaret Walther Program in Palliative Care Research and Education symposium “Passages and Promises: Innovations in Palliative Care Research Education and Practice” at the IUPUI Campus Center on Nov. 17.

Linking to other community events of importance is a Spirit & Place goal, said David Bodenhamer, the executive director of The Polis Center and one of those who helped create the festival.

“Spirit & Place’s success ultimately rests upon its ability to connect to the larger civic interests and concerns represented by an ever-growing number of groups in our city who, like Spirit & Place, want to make Indianapolis an even better place tomorrow than it is today,” Bodenhamer said.

Simple, open-ended themes are a deliberate choice, said Pam Blevins Hinkle, the festival director.

“We purposefully choose themes that are timely and resonate broadly in the community,” she said. Such themes help organizations find intriguing partnerships with other groups and explore issues more deeply.

Bodenhamer said he has been pleasantly surprised by some of those partnerships.

“I underestimated both the desire to contribute and the ways in which people wanted to collaborate across sectors,” he said. “People want to experience the whole city, not only their part of it. In this sense, Spirit & Place has touched a longing for connections that make a difference. The festival has encouraged this city’s cultural re-awakening and its belief in itself as a city of worth.”

Simple themes “evoke a wide range of feelings, images, memories and reflections that stoke the imagination and create a sense of anticipation for the November festival,” Hinkle said. The themes often offer an interesting mix of individual and community journeys.

Though other cities have shown an interest in imitating the impact of Spirit & Place, Bodenhamer said none have been able to replicate it.

“Spirit & Place is unique because Indianapolis is unique: we have our own history, our own traditions, our own sense of time and space,” he said.

by Ric Burrous

Learn more about this year’s festival.

 

Call for Nominations: Max Planck Research Award

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Excellent scientists and scholars of all nationalities who are expected to continue producing outstanding academic achievements in international collaboration – not least with the assistance of this award – are eligible to be nominated for the Max Planck Research Award.

On an annually-alternating basis, the call for nominations addresses areas within the natural and engineering sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences and humanities.

The Max Planck Research Award 2015 will be conferred in the area of humanities and social sciences in the subject

Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism
.
The multidisciplinary field “Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism” addresses a range of diverse fundamental, partly interconnected research questions with reference to the development and change of religious thought and practice on their way to modernity and up to the present time. Is the conventional equation between modernity and secularisation a valid one? To what extent is the system of values, which shapes modern culture and society, rooted in the Christian tradition of the Middle Ages or in that of the early modern period (individualism, human rights, the intrinsic value of a secular order in contrast to a spiritual one)? Other questions playing a role within this debate address the adaptability of different religious and confessional communities to the challenges of modernity, as well as the relationship between state/secular authority and church(es) or other religious communities in the recent past and particularly in our present time. Concepts which are important in this area are for example laicism (Laïcité) or “civil religion” or privileging large religious communities. Finally the rise of religious pluralism and the individualisation of religious experience are relevant phenomena for this topic.

Every year, the Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society grant two research awards to one researcher working abroad and one researcher working in Germany. These two awards will be bestowed independently.

The Presidents/Vice Chancellors of universities and the heads of research institutions in Germany are eligible to make nominations (c.f. list of eligible nominators). Direct applications are not accepted. As a rule, each award is endowed with 750,000 EUR and may be used over a period of three to a maximum of five years to fund research chosen by the award winner.

Sponsor deadline: 31 Jan 2015, Nominations

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Max Planck Research Award

Volunteers’ actions still reverberate more than a decade on

The John Herron Society's namesake File image

The John Herron Society’s namesake
File image

A handful of enthusiastic volunteers inspired Dean Valerie Eickmeier to create the John Herron Society. Because of their vision 13 years ago, more than 100 society members support the school’s mission with annual, unrestricted giving at a minimum of $1,000. Many give much more.

While the numbers demonstrate the commitment of individuals in our community who value the arts, it is what happens because of their support that matters most.

The John Herron Society provides for student success, academic programs, community outreach and new opportunities and initiatives. This kind of private support is critical for Herron to compete on a national level as a premier school of art and design.

“I’ve enjoyed engaging with our community as individuals step forward with support to the John Herron Society,” Dean Eickmeier said. “Each year, it’s exciting to welcome new members and thank current members for their ongoing support. I also make it a priority to keep members informed throughout the year regarding what their support is making possible.”

One of the school’s priorities for this academic year is to enhance the learning and social environment for Herron’s students. Eskenazi Hall is dotted with new furniture—providing a space to build community. A student emergency fund is being established and a new mentoring program is being developed. Each of these initiatives helps ensure student success by giving students the resources and experiences needed to reach their educational goals.

Two of the newest members of the John Herron Society, Dr. David Crabb and his wife, Ellen, “believe the support of art, and Herron in particular, is important for several reasons,” said Dr. Crabb. “We both are involved in creative activities in art and design. Our children have been deeply involved in and benefitted immensely from deep and broad exposure to the arts— a common culture we share with them. Perhaps most importantly, learning about art opens our eyes to worlds we might simply miss, were it not for the training of perception and insight that art gives us.”

Herron is pleased to announce a challenge gift from Drs. Jane Fortune and Robert R. Hesse, who will match up to $10,000 of new John Herron Society gifts during the 2014-2015 academic year. Their generous support is meant as an incentive to recruit new donors, who are so important to Herron for a strong future.

John Herron Society members enjoy private receptions and dinners, behind-the-scenes experiences and unique interactions with students and faculty. Most importantly, members can be confident that their investment in the lives of others is an important contribution toward fulfilling Herron’s educational and artistic mission.

To learn more about becoming a member of the John Herron Society, contact Kim Hodges, Office of Development, at 317-278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu. To give online, visit www.herron.iupui.edu.

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

  1. Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development);
  2. Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences;
  3. Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences.

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadlines: December 3, 2014 (SLA Internal Deadline November 26), 5 pm

Terms of Awards: Applicants can request up to $75,000 for one year. Budgets must be justified and consistent with the scope of the proposed project. Applicants must commit to submitting an external funding proposal within 18 months from the start of the award; failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding programs. Recipients of funding in 2014-15 will participate in an open Workshop in the spring of 2016 where awardees will present project results and detailed plans to secure external funding. Final reports are required at study completion detailing the project’s progress including proposals submitted and funding received. IUCRG support should be acknowledged in all related publications and reports. Award notices are expected to go out no later than February 21 with funds available March 15, 2015.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

Guidelines

International Development Fund (IDF) Applications Now Available

imagesThe IDF grant was developed to enhance the international research and scholarly activity focus of the IUPUI academic mission. Generally, the IDF grant serves as venture capital to stimulate additional funding for international research and scholarly activity, which have strong potential to generate indirect cost recovery from extramural sources.

 

Deadline: November 15 (SLA Internal Deadline November 8) 5 p.m.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Eligibility is limited to principal investigators with full-time faculty appointments within a unit located on the Indianapolis campus.
  • Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

FUNDING AND PROJECT DURATION

  • Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.
  • Faculty salaries will not be funded through this mechanism.
  • Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism.
  • An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one proposal in a given round, and may apply for only one category.
  • Applications must show strong promise of funding support from outside sources, contributing to the recovery of indirect costs.
  • A letter of support from the applicant’s Chair is required.

CATEGORIES

  • International Research and Scholarly Activity Program Initiation: up to $15,000 to support international research and scholarly activity program initiation efforts, not maintenance of existing international programs. New initiations as well as existing partnerships adding new components will be considered.
  • Small International Research and Scholarly Activity Travel Grant: up to $3,000 for travel necessary to initiate new partnerships activities. Preference given for travel to key international partner institutions.
  • Supplement for Residence at Key Partner Institutions in Support of Research and Scholarly Activity: up to $5,000 generally in the form of a sabbatical or grant supplement to encourage and oversee partnership activities, visits, exchanges, while in residence.
  • School or Department Internationalization: up to $5,000 to a department or school to spend a year developing a comprehensive internationalization plan supporting research and scholarly activity, in collaboration with the Office of International Affairs and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.
  • Innovative Use of Technology for Internationalization: up to $5,000 to faculty for making use of interactive video or various web platforms to advance the internationalization of research or the classroom.

Guidelines and Application

Final Report Form

Important Note: Guidelines for most of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research internal grant programs have changed. The new guidelines must be used for all applications starting this fall including resubmissions.

(deadlines that fall on Saturday or Sunday will be due the following Monday)

 

Mural design by Sichuga and Hankins enables volunteers to create on Lilly Global Day of Service

A group of Eli Lilly and Company employees painting a section of mural on October 2. The 2,600 square foot design was created by Herron senior Andrey Sichuga and alumnus Chad Hankins. Image courtesy Andrey Sichuga

A group of Eli Lilly and Company employees painting a section of mural on October 2. The 2,600 square foot design was created by Herron senior Andrey Sichuga and alumnus Chad Hankins.
Image courtesy Andrey Sichuga

A mural designed by two Herron School of Art and Design buddies, alumnus Chad Hankins (B.F.A. in Sculpture, 2013) and Andrey Sichuga, a senior majoring in painting, sprang to life when Eli Lilly and Company Global Day of Service volunteers painted it on October 2.

Eli Lilly and Company’s Global Day of Service benefits people around the globe wherever the pharmaceutical manufacturer has facilities. Indianapolis was no exception in this, the seventh year of the massive effort. More than 8,400 local Lilly employees fanned out across Indianapolis this year to complete hundreds of tasks—from pulling weeds to conducting fitness assessments in more than 150 individual projects.

One group of about 30 people busied itself with painting more than 2,600 square feet of underpass and columns at Harding Street and I-70 where a giant mural depicts a fantastic scene of flora and fauna.

The design was the brainchild of two Herron School of Art and Design buddies who estimate that they spent about three months all told developing the design and preparing it so the volunteers could accomplish their goal. The two were on site to direct the painting.

Their design collaboration happened by accident when they ran into each other in August at a creative placemaking event put on by Reconnecting Our Waterways and hosted by the Eiteljorg Museum. They heard about the project there.

The duo submitted separate designs to Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, a local Day of Service project manager. Ultimately Sichuga’s design prevailed. “He’s loose, I’m tight, he’s natural, I’m industrial,” said Hankins. “My design was somewhat political, his went for beauty.” Hankins and Sichuga decided to partner early on because of the sheer size of the area they had to cover.

Hankins tried to research iconic images from the west side—such as a long-gone rocket slide that was a favorite piece of playground equipment for generations in Rhodius Park, but he found it difficult to get ideas from the community about what they’d like to see. He said he felt that as good as the Harding Street mural is, the project would have been even stronger with more input from the people who actually live in the neighborhood.

“At first I thought it would be really easy—most murals are three or four colors,” Hankins said. “But our design needed 51 colors. Sherwin Williams donated the paint. It was like being a kid in a candy store when we walked in there. Keep Indianapolis Beautiful wrote the checks.”

“A project like this is not a walk in the park,” Hankins continued, noting that it had its share of challenges, including a giant pile of mulch that he and some friends had to move in order to transfer the paint-by-number design onto an underpass surface. He also had to borrow a generator to power a projector and trace the outlines in waning daylight, which made the cars whizzing by more of a concern.

“It’s the kind of job you take to build a portfolio,” he continued. “Design and scale-wise, we’ve had quite a learning experience.” In the end, watching the volunteers bring the perspective-driven design to life “was worth it.”

Sichuga said the experience of watching the volunteers was akin to watching “a garden blossom.” As an artist, he’s spent considerable time thinking about how to act upon society’s problems and make a “positive influence” through his work. “This project,” he said, “provided a glimpse of one way to go about it.”

Korean War veteran and Herron alumnus Paul Rickey leads an art-full life

Paul Rickey with his artwork Image courtesy Paul Rickey

Paul Rickey with his artwork
Image courtesy Paul Rickey

Herron alumnus Paul Rickey has traveled far and wide and hosted broadcasts on radio and cable television about the visual arts in both California and Oregon since his days at Herron. “I attended Herron from 1949 to 1951 prior to enlisting in the Navy during the Korean War,” he said, noting that he studied with Garo Antreasian. He counts Antreasian, Robert Indiana (know then as Robert Clark, two years ahead of Rickey at Tech High School) and Herron alumnus Hale Woodruff among his “most admired artists.”

“After the Navy, I graduated from New York University with a bachelor’s degree in art education, and I studied at the Art Students League in New York,” he said. Now a resident of Corvallis, Oregon, he teaches and exhibits locally at the Pegasus Gallery and through the Corvallis Art Guild, favoring landscape, portrait and still life work rendered in felt pen, colored pencil, pastels or water color.

He estimates that he’s interviewed “about 150 artists all told, counting years in California and Oregon. “I wanted to support the arts. I wanted to give a place for artists to speak of their concerns about the arts,” he said. “I talk about art movements, famous artists and local art exhibitions.”

His California show, The Arts Scene, was the only one on air in all of northern California” at the time, he said. It ran on Wednesday evenings on KKUP-FM for 642 shows from 1994 to 2001 and online for another five years. The cable Channel 29 show, Focus on Art, is his Corvallis outlet.

Still, after all this time, Rickey fondly insists that he owes “much of my art success to my early training at Herron.”

Deborah Butterfield will present on opening night of undergraduate student exhibitions

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014 Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014
Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Iconic artist Deborah Butterfield partly credits her birthdate on the 75th running of the Kentucky Derby as inspiration for her life size, sculptural horses. Each of her in-demand and internationally collected works takes three to five years to make. Butterfield will appear at Herron as the 2014 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist lecturer on November 12 at 6:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Butterfield to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” Fortune said. This is the seventh lecture in the series, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum, Judith Shea and Maria Magdalena Campos Pons to Indianapolis.

Butterfield appears in conjunction with the opening of the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, which this year will take place in both Eskenazi Hall’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries and in various spaces of the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Shuttle service will be available between buildings. This year’s jurist will be Dr. Patricia Y. Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In a typical year, the jurist must select from more than 300 strong submissions across a wide variety of media. The exhibition continues through November 29.

Also opening will be On the Blink, a show of photography, video, performance and installation works by Photography and Intermedia seniors.

New to the mix this year will be a graduate studio crawl. With more than 60 master’s degree students—in two buildings—the studio crawl will give students and visitors alike a chance to peek behind the curtain of spaces that are normally not seen by other students or the public.

In the Marsh Gallery, the FACE Pets Show, a group exhibition, continues with works available for purchase to benefit the Foundation Against Companion Animal Euthanasia. In the Basile Gallery, view selections from a rare collection of artists books and broadsides representing the free exchange of ideas in the wake of a 2007 car bombing in the center of Bagdad on al-Mutanabbi Street. These shows continue through November 19.

China’s evolving philanthropy sector is focus of two-day summit in Indianapolis

Gene Tempel

Gene Tempel

Scott Kennedy

Scott Kennedy

Philanthropists, scholars and business people from around the world are gathering Friday and Saturday in Indianapolis for a summit on the present and future role of philanthropy in one of the world’s most rapidly growing economies, China.

The academic conference, at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Hine Hall, attracted so much interest that registration had to be closed. Organizers are hoping to eventually present some of the sessions online.

Scott Kennedy, director of the Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business at IU Bloomington, said he was surprised by public interest in the topic. More often, he sees Americans’ interest in China driven by concerns over its growing military and economic influence.

“I thought there would be less interest in social activism in China and what could be done to make the country a better place, but obviously I was wrong,” said Kennedy, whose center is based within the School of Global and International Studies. “There are people who are concerned about the environment, health care and a lot of other issues that the Chinese government can’t solve on its own.

“It just so turns out that America is the home of the global philanthropic movement,” he added. “Americans, both individually and through organizations, contribute a lot to our country and have been quite involved in China as well.”

Conference organizers had planned for about 75 people, but nearly twice as many — about 140 — are registered for the China Philanthropy Summit.

The conference highlights a three-year Initiative on Philanthropy in China funded by the Henry Luce Foundation and the Ford Foundation, jointly carried out by the IU Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business and the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“We are pleased to welcome our distinguished colleagues from China and U.S. institutions, both those presenting and those learning along with us as attendees,” said Gene Tempel, founding dean of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“This is an exciting time in China and in the world of philanthropy. The summit is a continuation of our work to learn from and learn with our Chinese colleagues as we work together to strengthen and inform philanthropy in both countries,” Tempel said.

Researchers from several leading U.S. and Chinese universities and institutions, including the University of Wisconsin, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Maryland, Tsinghua University and Sun Yat-Sen University, will present the findings from 11 research projects associated with the initiative.

In addition, panels of both young and seasoned practitioners from China’s philanthropic community will participate in a variety of panels. Among them will be Yang Peng, former president of the Shenzhen-based One Foundation, and Holly Chang, founder and president of the Beijing-based Golden Bridges Foundation. The co-founders of the Hong Kong-based organization Philanthropy in Motion also are participating.

Today in China, about 3,000 foundations and non-governmental organizations are rapidly expanding activities. Corporate social responsibility programs are proliferating and social enterprises are taking root. A substantial community of experts and activists with strong ties with the global philanthropic community has become increasingly active.

Although China’s economic development path has been very successful, a growing gap between the extent of problems facing society and the government’s ability to address them has developed, said Angela Bies, endowed associate professor of global philanthropy and nonprofit leadership at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Philanthropic activity could be a key way to fill that gap.

“China’s contemporary philanthropic sector is at a pivotal juncture where societal needs are complex and pressing,” Bies said. “And while philanthropic capacity is immense and social innovation and experimentation exciting, the institutional environment and organizational capacity for philanthropy remain emergent and in flux. In this regard, it is vital for scholars and practitioners to come together and jointly reflect on these issues.”

The Initiative on Philanthropy in China was announced last summer, and since then there have been nearly a dozen research projects and a workshop and conferences in China. Last spring, a new course on philanthropy in China was offered at IU Bloomington and IUPUI. Three students received internships in China, working with Cummins Inc., Mercy Corps and China Development Brief.

One highlight of the China Philanthropy Summit will be the conceptual presentation of “My Philanthropic Story,” a bilingual, user-driven website that will go live early next year. The site will be dedicated to promoting philanthropy in China through the personal stories of givers and recipients.

“It will be a way to promote philanthropy, not through academic research like the kinds we’re going to see this week, but through the voices of average people, which we think will be more powerful,” Kennedy said.

A mix of social media and connections from other key websites, combined with support from within the philanthropic sector in China, will draw attention to “My Philanthropic Story.”

Editors: As previously mentioned, registration for the conference is closed, but media are welcome. Contact George Vlahakis at IU Communications or Adriene Davis Kalugyer of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy to arrange for interviews.