IUPUI library collaborates to create digital collection honoring Allison Transmission’s centennial

INDIANAPOLIS — As part of ongoing efforts to preserve and share the history of Allison thTransmission in honor of the manufacturer’s centennial in 2015, Allison and University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have collaborated in the creation of a new digital collection.

The project, executed by the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, enables unprecedented access to Allison Transmission’s heritage in a searchable database. The online collection includes newsletters, brochures, advertisements, press releases and selected photographs.

Following current preservation standards for scanning and metadata creation, the Center for Digital Scholarship has created the most comprehensive digital collection of Allison materials available to the public. The project, which began in December 2013 with a pilot collection of 137 digital objects, now includes more than 2,600 items. The selections are from a larger archival collection held by Allison.

Creating digital files allows rare and fragile original items to be preserved and protected. Preservation of the digitized copies is also secure in that high-resolution master files are backed up on multiple servers and protected by University Library for future generations.

The Center for Digital Scholarship works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of Indiana communities. The center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for both the rights of authors, and the public’s fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

About Allison Transmission

Allison Transmission is the world’s largest manufacturer of fully automatic transmissions for medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicles and is a leading manufacturer of hybrid-propulsion systems for city buses. Allison transmissions are used in a variety of applications including refuse, construction, fire, distribution, bus, motorhomes, defense and energy. Founded in 1915 by James A. Allison, the company is headquartered in Indianapolis with additional manufacturing facilities in Hungary and India.

About IUPUI University Library

Serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users, the University Library at IUPUI supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Resources include signature collections like the Joseph and Matthew Payton Philanthropic Studies Library, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections & Archives and the Herron Art Library, plus over 60 digital collections.

Informatics students help create app to enhance Dream Cars exhibit experience at IMA

Dream Cars Image from IMAmuseum.orgThousands of people are expected to visit the Indianapolis Museum of Art to see a unique type of motor spectacle when it opens Sunday. When they do, their experience will be enhanced by the Dream Cars Design Studio app created in cooperation with two Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas, May 3 – Aug. 23, will feature rare concept cars from the early 1930s to the 21st century, showcasing some of the most unique vehicles ever created by top names in the automotive field, including General Motors, Porsche, Bugatti and BMW.

Visitors to the exhibition will be also able to learn about the car design process in the Damon C. and Kay D. Davis Lab — on the second floor of the museum—through videos, images and a number of participatory activities, such as designing their own dream car using the Dream Cars Design Studio iPad app.

The app will guide children (6 and older) and adults through a number of steps, such as selecting fuel and engine types, the car silhouette, various accessories and colors. At each step, visitors will be able to see how their design and engineering choices affect a number of variables including cost, fuel efficiency and speed. The completed cars can be shared with family and friends by email, and will also be projected on the wall in the Davis Lab. The app will also be available for download, free of charge, in the App Store.

The app was developed by graduate student Vance Vaden, project manager and animator, and freshman Michael Auer, interaction developer.

Vaden and Auer began working on the app in September 2014, and collaborated with the IMA’s interpretation and technology team on the project. The app was completed in December.

“It’s fairly experimental for all of us right now,” said Zeb Wood, media arts and science lecturer at IUPUI. “The museum wanted to try using technology to enhance the exhibit, and we wanted to give students the chance to work on a real-world project for real clients.”

Among the app requirements: It had to be entertaining and easy to use for all ages, yet more informative for adults.

“It was a difficult challenge,” Wood said. “But these two wanted the opportunity, we briefed them, and they have been dealing with an entire committee at the IMA ever since.

“We have students who sometimes graduate without creating something like this. Now we have a freshman and a first-semester graduate student creating fully functional apps. This is a huge jump for us,” Wood continued.

“The success of the project will open the eyes of other students. “They are going to say, ‘I don’t have to wait four years to try to create something for a community partner. I can get started right away.’”

The experience is one Auer won’t forget.

“This project has given me the chance to learn about working with a professional development team,” Auer said. “My previous projects were mostly solo ventures, and so making the transition to a team-based one was incredibly enlightening. Since most projects in the real world are centered on group work and deadlines, experiencing these things really improved my skills.”

Auer, who volunteered for the project, said his ability to write algorithms and solve problems increased ten-fold. “There is a big difference between working for yourself and working for a large art museum, and I believe that it really pushed me to become better at what I do.”

Vaden also found the project to be an interesting experience.

“Having an actual client definitely changed the way I approached each task, since everything I did was for them, rather than for a grade and myself,” said Vaden. “I found myself communicating more and paying close attention to wording and detail a lot more than I usually would. “The internship was probably the best experience I had this semester since I got more professional experience and worked in a different environment than I had ever worked in previously.”

“What makes this particular project unique is the fact that the museum was so willing to work in tandem with the school’s students, treating this as a learning experience for both student and the professionals on the IMA side of things,” said Travis Faas, media arts and science lecturer at IUPUI.

Perhaps the most interesting part of this project is the skill levels involved, Faas said.

“The primary developer, Michael, was a first-semester freshman going into this project,” he said. “Working along with this team, he has had more opportunity to learn ‘how it is done’ in the real world compared to many of his peers. It is a real eye-opener to learn just how much work goes into the production of an even relatively simple app.”

Interpretation materials and content for the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s presentation of Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas were created with the support of an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The exhibition will open at the IMA on May 3, 2015. Tickets are $18 for adults and $10 for children ages 6 to 17. Admission is free for children under five years, college students from non-profit and public colleges and universities in Marion County, and IMA members.

Workshop: Introduction to Databases for the Digital Humanities

Michael Mandiberg. Database at Postmasters, March 2009. CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/theredproject/3332644561/sizes/lMay 19, 2015
2-4 pm
IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IUPUI Library room UL 4115P
Free Registration

Databases are becoming increasingly important to research projects in the humanities. From storing to structuring to analyzing our digitized corpuses and data sets, databases provide humanists with a powerful tool to ask new questions and to discover new answers to old questions. But, where does the scholar who is new to databases begin?

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of database design for humanities research. You will learn on SQLite (http://sqlite.org), a flexible and versatile open source database engine that is the most widely deployed SQL database engine in the world.

What will you learn in this workshop

  • Database concepts
  • How common data manipulation/cleaning tasks can be accomplished in SQLite
  • How to import vast amounts of data in SQLite
  • How to query data from SQLite
  • How to use SQLite’s full feature set (e.g. full-text search and geospatial data store) to simplify analysis

What will you need?

  • A personal laptop with internet connection
  • Data used for the demonstration will be provided. You are welcome to bring your own data sets

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

Come enjoy food, art and people at Look/See 2015—Herron’s Year-end Celebration

Thursday, May 7, 4–9 p.m.
Look/See, Herron School of Art and Design’s celebration of the academic year end, kicks herron_posteroff on Thursday, May 7 with a full slate of events at both Herron buildings.

Honors and Awards
To start the party, join us for the Honors and Awards ceremony in the IUPUI Campus Center at 4:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and cheer the accomplishments of students and faculty alike.

M.F.A. Exhibition
Then it’s on to the 2015 M.F.A. Exhibition beginning at 5:00 p.m., which showcases pinnacle works by master’s degree candidates Brent Aldrich, Stephanie J. Beisel, Carly ConnellyDi Sun, Matthew Eickhoff, Jonathan Love, Andrés Marcial, Kristen Jane Morsches, Katie R. Smith, Stephen Smolinski, Shelley Spicuzza and Jac Tardie.

Art Therapy
For the first time, Herron master’s degree candidates in Art Therapy Bonnie Burke, Chelsea Leeds, Elisa Pamelia, Meghan Sullivan, Mu-Chien Tsai, and Kaycee Wilson will have a display that explains their discipline and includes versions of their theses for people to look at.

Visual Communication Design
Master’s degree candidates in Visual Communication Design Kaelyn Donnelly, Jennifer Smerdel and Nicholas Walters also will have an interactive exhibition including panels that describe their research processes, outcomes and contexts.

This culminating exhibition takes up all the available gallery space in both Eskenazi Hall and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center.

Think It Make It Lab
The public will also get its first chance to see Herron’s new Think It Make It Lab in Eskenazi Hall, which is chock-full of the latest in 3-D and other digital technologies. Live demonstrations of 3-D printing and laser cutting will be included, with a memento for visitors to take home.

The festivities include:

  • Momentum: Design in Action, a Visual Communication Design senior show
  • open studios
  • tours
  • print and ceramics sale
  • refreshments

Parking:
Park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on floors 4–6 of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6:00 p.m. Park on any floor after 6:00 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation.

Shuttle
Continuous shuttle service available throughout the evening.

RSVP on Facebook

Herron School of Art and Design seniors to create First Friday pop-up gallery in semitrailers

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design painting majors Amy Applegate, Josh herron_posterHaines, Brian Johnson, Andrey Sichuga and Shannon White are putting together a pop-up gallery in Fountain Square for First Friday.

When the students present their senior show “Grant Illusions” in the parking lot of Wildwood Market, 1015 Virginia Ave., on May 1, it will be because they not only produced the artistic works displayed, but they also pulled sponsors and the entire community together to make the large-scale event possible.

Show sponsor Celadon Trucking agreed early on to loan and deliver multiple semitractor-trailers to the site.

Visitors to the exhibit will find that each of the Herron seniors has a solo show in a separate semitrailer. The show also includes a communal area that will feature collaborative and individual performances and a film screening.

The organizers promise the show will have something for everyone. Additional sponsors include B’s Po Boys, ESL Spectrum, Fountain Square Brewery, IMOCA, Indy Restoration, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, New Day Meadery, Southeast Neighborhood Development and The Glick Foundation.

Italian Film Festival returns to IUPUI for fourth year

INDIANAPOLIS — The Italian Film Festival returns to Indianapolis for a fourth year April 24 Italian Film Festivalwith a slate of six films running through May 3.

Indianapolis is one of 12 cities around the nation hosting the Italian Film Festival USA. The festival is a collaboration between the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts and is sponsored by the National Italian American Foundation, Istituto Italiano di Cultura and the Italian Heritage Society of Indiana, as well as other local corporate and individual sponsors.

All films are presented with English subtitles and are free and open to the public.

The films will be shown in the Lilly Auditorium on the lower level of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St.

The schedule for the festival is as follows:

“La Sedia della Felicità” (“The Chair of Happiness”), comedy, 6 p.m. Friday, April 24: A treasure hidden in a chair; a cosmetologist and a tattoo artist who fall in love while looking for the treasure; a mysterious priest looming over them like a threat. Rivals at first, then allies, the three of them become the protagonists of an incredible adventure.

“Un Ragazzo d’Oro” (“A Golden Boy”), drama, 3 p.m. Saturday, April 25: Davide, son of a screenwriter, is an advertising copywriter whose dream is to pen something beautiful. But he suffers from anxiety and lack of satisfaction. When his father suddenly dies, Davide returns home to Rome where he meets a beautiful editor who wants to publish the book that Davide’s father had allegedly been writing.

“Song’e Napule,” (“Song of Napoli”), comedy, 3 p.m. Sunday, April 26: Paco is a refined but unemployed pianist. His mother lands him a job with the police, but his total ineptitude relegates him to a judiciary warehouse. Then one day Police Commissioner Cammarota, who is on the trail of the faceless yet dangerous killer known as O’Fantasma, arrives. He needs a pianist to infiltrate the Lollo Love band, which will perform at the wedding of the daughter of the mafia boss of Somma Vesuviana.

“La Mafia Uccide Solo d’Estate” (“The Mafia Kills Only in Summer”), comedy, 6 p.m. Friday, May 1: A story told through the eyes of Arturo, who grows up in Palermo, a fascinating yet terrifying city ruled by the mafia. It is, in fact, a love story about Arturo’s attempts to win the heart of his beloved Flora, who he considers a princess and with whom he has fallen head over heels in love since elementary school. As this tender and amusing story unfolds, Sicily’s most tragic events from the ’70s to the ’90s take place.

“Anime Nere” (“Black Souls”), drama, 3 p.m. Saturday, May 2: The story of three brothers — the sons of shepherds with ties to the ‘ndrangheta — and their divided souls. Luigi, the youngest, is an international drug dealer. Rocco, Milanese by adoption, is to all appearances a middle-class businessman, thanks to his brother’s ill-gotten gains. Luciano, the eldest, harbors a pathological fantasy of pre-industrial Calabria. After a trivial argument, Luciano’s 20-year-old son Leo carries out an act of intimidation against a bar protected by a rival clan — the spark that lights the fire.

“Il Capitale Umano” (“Human Capital”), drama, 3 p.m. Sunday, May 3: A winter night, on a suburban road, a cyclist is hit by a SUV. What exactly happened? The only sure thing is that this accident will change the destiny of two families, that of Giovanni Bernaschi, a top finance executive, and that of Dino Ossola, an ambitious real estate developer who is on the verge of bankruptcy. Liberally based on the book of the same name by Stephen Amidon.

Bodenhamer publishes new book on mapping and the humanities

The Polis Center’s Executive Director David Bodenhamer shares his expertise in spatial 9780253015600_medhumanities in a recently published book, Deep Maps and Spatial Humanities. Part of the IU Press Series on Spatial Humanities, the book appeared in February 2015 and features essays that investigate deep mapping and the spatial narratives that stem from it.

A deep map is a detailed, multimedia depiction of a place and all that exists within it. Whereas traditional maps serve as statements, deep maps serve as conversations. They use Geographic Information Systems as one tool among many digital technologies to enhance an understanding of space and place. Deep mapping encompasses platform, process, and product, with all three expressions embracing the multiple forms of evidence used by humanists and social scientists. This highly innovative approach to questions of space and place aims to make technology more amenable to the needs of scholars and to facilitate a more robust, visual, and interactive spatial narrative [more about Deep Maps and Spatial Narratives]. Each essay in the volume examines deep mapping as a means of exploring the complex problems of society and culture through new creative spaces that are visual, structurally open, multimedia, and multi-layered.

Contributors to the volume come from a variety of disciplines, including GIScience, computer science, history, religious studies, and geography. “What makes deep mapping exciting as an approach is that it draws upon the insights of many disciplines to help us understand how space and culture influence each other—and it uses new technical means to facilitate this understanding,” said Bodenhamer. “We no longer are confined to the flat map but now can use dynamic virtual spaces to explore our data, develop new questions, and enrich our perspective on how society and culture have evolved.”

In addition to his leadership of the Polis Center, Bodenhamer is Professor of History at the IU School of Liberal Arts and editor of IJHAC: A Journal of the Digital Humanities(Edinburgh University Press). In addition to his international reputation as a leader in the spatial humanities, he also is a well-published scholar in American legal and constitutional history. He is joined as editor of this volume by John Corrigan is the Lucius Moody Bristol Distinguished Professor of Religion and Professor of History at Florida State University and Trevor M. Harris is Eberly Professor of Geography at West Virginia University. The three scholars also serve as founding directors of the Virtual Center for Spatial Humanities; they jointly led an international NEH Advanced Institute on Spatial Narratives and Deep maps that was held at IUPUI in June 2012.

The book is now available for purchase at IU Press and other vendors.

Ph.D. music technology program to be offered at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a Ph.D. program thin music technology at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

One of the principal objectives of the program is to train graduates who will develop and research transformative new technologies in music and the arts, according to Debra S. Burns, associate professor of music therapy and chair of the school’s Department of Music and Arts Technology.

Graduates will also explore the practices of designing, making and managing music technology, developing research methodologies in music technology, and integrating music technology in society and industry.

“The Ph.D. program in music technology addresses the comprehensive nature of the field, whose needs include designing new technological tools and techniques, leadership, business entrepreneurship, interdisciplinary research, and creative activity utilizing new and evolving technologies,” Burns said.

Music technology degree programs have been proliferating throughout the country over the past few years. More recently, it has started to emerge as an academic discipline internationally, Burns said. The Ph.D. program builds on the continuing success of the department’s undergraduate and master’s programs.

In addition to academic positions, graduates will be qualified for employment at a number of performing arts organizations and educational centers, such as Auralex Corp. in Indianapolis; Black Entertainment Television in Washington, D.C.; D’Addario Music Products in Farmingdale, N.Y.; MakeMusic Inc. in Minneapolis; Music for All Inc. in Indianapolis; National Arts Center in Athens, Greece; National Arts Center in Beijing; Ruth Lilly Health Education Center in Indianapolis; Scripps Network Interactive in Nashville, Tenn.; Seoul Arts Center in Seoul, Korea; and Sirius Radio in New York.

“The rise of technologies such as file sharing, portable computing and interactive media have transformed the very nature of how music is both created and experienced,” Burns said. “It is expected that the Ph.D. program will produce academic and professional leaders capable of addressing a rapidly changing environment driven by continual development and integration of technology.”