Anila Quayyum Agha: Art, Education, and the Making of Future Creative Thinkers

anila_agha_mainDate: October 12, 2015
Reception: 4:30-5:30 PM
Lecture: 5:30-7:00 PM
Location: IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202

A successful art practice need not be measured solely on commercial success but also on the quality of life of the practitioner. Artistic excellence in creative fields is often the result of a great deal of time spent in research: analyzing, synthesizing and then producing well crafted art or design work that is heartfelt, layered and relevant to our times. The source of my own artwork has been interpretations of contrasts and similarities, within cultures/religions/rituals of people of myriad cultures. This subject matter requires deep intellectual introspection, concept development and research to assimilate it into the artwork. Having a disciplined approach to exploring a broad spectrum of ideas helps to formulate the foundations for a successful and self-sustaining long-term practice. Furthermore artistic training provides opportunities to explore a wide array of interests and to experiment and innovate with a variety of materials/processes along with conceptual development and a mastery of the visual language to deal with the challenges present in our current societies and which is essential for success in the world today. Such skills are transferable into myriad disciplines for professional advancement for students while simultaneously adding value to their lives through personal well being.

About the speaker:

Anila Quayyum Agha is Associate Professor of Drawing and Foundation Studies in the Herron School of Art and Design. She was born in Lahore, Pakistan. She has an MFA from the University of North Texas. Agha’s work has been exhibited in multiple international art fairs as well as in over twenty solo shows and fifty group shows. In 2005, Agha was an Artist in Resident at the Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston. In 2008 she relocated to Indianapolis to teach at the Herron School of Art in Indianapolis and is currently the associate professor of drawing. In 2009 Agha was the recipient of the Efroymson Arts Fellowship. She has received two IAHI grants (2010/ 2015) and a New Frontiers Research Grant (2012) from Indiana University. In 2013 Agha received the Creative Renewal Fellowship awarded by the Indianapolis Arts Council. Agha won the two top prizes at ArtPrize 2014, in the international art competition held in Grand Rapids,Michigan. Her entry, titled “Intersections”, earned the ArtPrize 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize and split the Juried Grand Prize in a tie.

Agha works in a cross disciplinary fashion with mixed media; creating artwork that explores global politics, cultural multiplicity, mass media, and social and gender roles in our current cultural and global scenario. As a result her artwork is conceptually challenging, producing complicated weaves of thought, artistic action and social experience.

IUPUI professor Edward Curtis to edit new book series on Africana religions

INDIANAPOLIS — Pennsylvania State University Press has named Edward Curtis, Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the co-editor of a new book series.

Curtis, co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions, says that the book series will adopt the journal’s global vision of both African and African diasporic religions.

“Like the journal, the book series will emphasize the translocal nature of Africana religions across national, regional and hemispheric boundaries,” Curtis said. The journal is also published by Pennsylvania State University Press.

The IUPUI professor will co-edit the book series with Sylvester A. Johnson, associate professor of African American studies and religious studies at Northwestern University. Johnson is also the co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions.

Curtis sees the book series as yet another sign of the growing interest in Africana religions and their global reach.

“National and colonial-drawn boundaries have too long shaped the formation of knowledge about black people and their religious commitments,” the IUPUI professor said. “This book series will help to nurture a community of scholars dedicated to analyzing the entire Africana world in all its richness.”

The series’ editorial board includes Afe Adogame of Princeton Theological Seminary, Sylviane Diouf of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Paul Christopher Johnson of the University of Michigan, Elizabeth Pérez of Dartmouth College, Elisha P. Renne of the University of Michigan and Judith Weisenfeld of Princeton University.

“We want to publish academic monographs in addition to books designed for classroom use about Africana religious experiences, identities, beliefs, aesthetics, ethics and institutions,” co-editor Sylvester Johnson said. “And we welcome a variety of methods, including archival, theoretical, literary, sociological and ethnographic approaches.”


The need for conversations around race and sexual orientation remains timely, as recent uAzQoo77_400x400events demonstrate that while progress is being made, much more must be done to realize full inclusion, equality and justice. It begins with increasing our understanding so we may be effective advocates and allies.
These structured, 3½-day dialogues provide selected participants the opportunity to explore issues related to race or sexual orientation in a safe environment where all voices can be heard in a climate of civility and respect. They can help improve the campus culture, build an inclusive and welcoming community, and improve inter-office relations for faculty and staff alike.

Two dialogue opportunities are being offered for fall:
October: Dialogue on Race
Thurs., Oct. 22
Fri., Oct. 23
Mon., Oct. 26
Tues., Oct. 27 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
November: Dialogue on Sexual Orientation
Mon., Nov. 2
Wed., Nov. 4
Wed., Nov. 11
Fri., Nov. 13 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. (each day,except as noted)

Steps of the IGD Model:
Stage 1: Creating a Shared Meaning of Dialogue
Stage 2: Identity, Social Relations and Conflict
Stage 3: Issues of Equity, Fairness and Inclusion: “Hot Topics”
Stage 4: Alliances and Empowerment

Registration Process: Please express your interest in participating by responding to this Survey Monkey Link.  Respond by: Oct 16 (race dialogue) or Oct. 26 (sex. orient. dialogue)
*Note: These dialogues require general parity (i.e., 50/50) in representation among participants based on the selected social identity for the dialogue (people of color/white; LGBT/straight). Ultimate selection for the dialogues will be based on efforts to achieve this parity.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka “Princess of Africa” at IUPUI

Yvonne Chaka Chaka – internationally famous South African singer, songwriter, Chaka_Headshotentrepreneur, and humanitarian – is dubbed the “Princess of Africa” by her fans, including Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.
She’ll be coming to Indianapolis October 12 and 13, sponsored by SOHO, a locally-based NGO that works in Swaziland, as well as various IUPUI units. Chaka Chaka will be speaking at IUPUI with Gail Masondo, author and life recovery coach, on: INDABA: Empowering Women and Youth in Africa & the U.S.

Monday, October 12th
IUPUI Campus Center, room 450

  • 1:30 – 2:45pm: Yvonne Chaka and Gail Masondo in Conversation
  • 2:45 – 4:00pm: Game-Changers Panel with Campus and Community Partners: What Can I Do?
    Ongoing Social Involvement and Resource Fair in CE 4th floor atriumAll events are free and open to the public. Learn more at:

Hourglass Is Back

For those of you who have been wishing for a return of Hourglass, it’s back! And this time, indianapolis-museum-of-art-dusk-david-pixelparableit will be held in BIG TENT at the Indianapolis Museum of Art 11/7 and 11/28!  And what’s BIG TENT, no less than a 40 foot diameter, 360 degree audio and visual environment, completely surrounding you in music and video.

We are very excited about this and hope you’ll mark the calendar with these dates.

A sixty-minute continuous arc of live and electronic music encouraging attendees to live in the moment with a community in motion. With Robin Cox -violin/composer, Shawn Goodman -bass clarinet, video by Ben Smith, and movement facilitated by Stephanie Nugent.,

11/7/15 at 4pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Toby Theater (as part of the Community Day “Secrets” event)

11/28/15 at 6pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Deer Zinc Pavilion (as part of the IMA’s “Silent Night” event)

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Open House

What are you doing on September 30 between 10:30 and 1:00? Surely, whatever it is will unnamedbe better after you’ve grabbed a coffee and bagel at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute’s Open House. While you’re here, check out our art collection, chat with us about our grant programs, and meet faculty and staff from across campus.

RSVP to the IAHI Open House
The IAHI is on the 4th floor of the University Library (Rooms UL 4115 P, S, T). Just take the elevator to the 4th floor and look to your left. There’s a sign hanging from the ceiling that will point you to us.

Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series returns to IUPUI for 2015-16 school year

INDIANAPOLIS—Professors in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue iu-logoUniversity Indianapolis will discuss their sabbatical projects throughout the 2015-16 school year. Topics include the process of creating the forged writings of Madeleine Hachard, growing up during the Nigerian civil war, and using online resources to teach drama.

The series is free and open to the public. The lectures will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., Room 268.

Friday, Oct. 9:Jing Wang, world languages and cultures, “Revealing Textbook Writers’ Perspectives.” Well-written textbooks are language instructors’ best friends; yet poorly prepared ones can burden instructors. This study interviews textbook writers to examine popular beginning and intermediate Chinese language textbooks used in the U.S. Study results reveal theoretical frameworks used by the textbook writers and consequently provide key information on textbook selection and language instruction—in Chinese and beyond.

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Daniella Kostroun, history, “The Invention of Madeleine Hachard and Other Discoveries About the 1727 Ursuline Mission to New Orleans.” Madeleine Hachard is considered Louisiana’s first female author, but the writings attributed to her are forgeries. Learn about the discovery of evidence documenting the fraud behind Hachard’s alleged writings as well as new insights about the pioneering Ursulines once we move beyond the “myth” of Hachard.

Friday, Nov. 13: David Craig, religious studies, “Religious Freedom and the Politics of Public Accommodations.” Given the controversy around Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, how should we think about corporate religious freedom and public accommodations? Shifting the focus from individuals’ religious beliefs to organizations’ mission integrity may create more common ground.

Tuesday, Feb. 2: Una Osili, economics/philanthropic studies, “War and Human Capital: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War.” Civil conflict is an obstacle to development in the developing world. The Nigerian Civil War was the first modern civil war in sub Saharan Africa. Four decades later, this study documents the war’s significant, long-run economic impact. Those exposed to the war as children and adolescents exhibit reduced adult stature, as well as adverse education, health and marriage outcomes.

Friday, Feb. 12: Brian McDonald, English, “A Dramatic Difference! Enhancing the Teaching and Learning of Drama With Online Tools.” Canvas, IUPUI’s new online teaching and learning environment, has user-friendly features that enhance faculty opportunities and student experiences. How can these capabilities be used to develop assignments that integrate both the textual and performative aspects of dramatic literature?

Wednesday, March 16: Anne Royalty, economics, “What Happens When Physicians Work Together?” Multi-specialty physician practices are increasingly common. These integrated settings may make it easier to coordinate patient care for patients seeing more than one doctor in the practice. Do practices that include general practitioners and specialists improve health outcomes or eliminate wasteful spending?

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Vermont Street Garage.

For more information or to RSVP, email

New IUPUI certificate program addresses need for translation professionals

INDIANAPOLIS — The current demand for skilled language translators far outweighs the 480965_w296supply available, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics has indicated that employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 46 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

A new certificate offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will prepare students for these careers. Applications for the new Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies are now being accepted. The post-graduate program begins in fall 2016.

“The new certificate program will help prepare the workforce needed for the numerous requests for the growing limited English proficiency populations in Indiana and in the U.S. by providing quality translations through emerging technologies,” said professor Enrica Ardemagni, director of the Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies.

Globalization of business, law and trade relations and changing U.S. demographics have increased demand for translation skills in many fields, especially educational, medical, legal and technical. Translation studies is the interdisciplinary study of the theory, description and application of translation, interpretation and localization. It is recognized as an academic discipline that includes the application of theory and practice to specific fields of translation.

Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals with advanced language proficiency in English and French, German and/or Spanish who are interested in the study of translation are invited to apply for the new IUPUI certificate program. A baccalaureate degree in a language from an accredited institution is required for admission; however, other degrees will be taken into consideration based on completion of prerequisites in preparation for graduate-level study. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

A minimum of 18 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies, which also includes advanced courses in interpreting (Spanish only). A required internship will give students hands-on practice to ensure command of the lexical precision and detailed understanding of contexts or terminologies as well as a nuanced sense of the purpose of language and its designated audience.

“We are proud to add this new certificate program to our program offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean Thomas J. Davis said. “These students will work with faculty in the Department of World Languages and Cultures as well as in other departments and the community to hone their translation skills, as well as to offer a much-needed service to the growing limited-English-proficiency populations of the state. These future translators will comprise the next generation of professionals who will ensure access to needed services; they will, as well, broaden the scope of research that can be done in several languages through exemplary translated works.”

The graduate certificate will be officially announced on International Translation Day at IUPUI. The event takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Bolivian author Maria Cristina Botelho will make a special presentation and deliver a bilingual reading from her book “Memoria de las Mariposas.”

Langsam/Oswalt Lecturer Summer Fellowship for Full-Time Non-Tenure Track Teaching Faculty

The Langsam/Oswalt Faculty Award award supports a summer fellowship for non-tenureiu-logo track, full-time teaching faculty to allow them to take a summer “sabbatical” from teaching to pursue professional development activities. This award is for $6,000, and can be used for summer salary (including required withholdings).

*****NOTE: The timeline on this award application has been moved to December to give departments time to change summer teaching schedules, as necessary.

Applications may be by individuals or by departments/programs and must detail proposed professional development activity that supports their teaching mission. Activities supported by this award include those that lead to scholarly dissemination of knowledge about teaching, curriculum development projects, and other activities of long-term professional benefit to the teacher and the unit, including related travel and/or conference expenses as well as library and equipment acquisitions. A committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts shall determine the recipient of the Fellowship based on the merit of the proposal.

Candidates must be non-tenure track, full time teaching faculty of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and have worked in this capacity for a minimum of three years. Visiting faculty are not eligible for this Fellowship. This Fellowship can be received in conjunction with other funding.

Submit the following:

  • A maximum of a three-page proposal detailing the activity and at least one letter of support. The entire proposal may not exceed more than 5 pages.
  • A current CV (does not count in page limit).

Submit all required documents, electronically, to Candice L. Smith, by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 23, 2015.

IUPUI to host seminar to motivate, prepare Hispanic students for college

INDIANAPOLIS — Nationally known spoken-word poet, hip-hop artist and actor Michael Reyes and other Hispanic professionals from various career fields will share theiMichael Reyes, META 2015 keynote speakerr success stories during an annual college preparedness program for Hispanic students. The program is designed to motivate and encourage the students to pursue a post-secondary education.

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in partnership with DePauw University, Ivy Tech Community College, Indianapolis Public Schools and other community partners, will welcome about 300 Hispanic students from high schools across the state to IUPUI on Monday, Sept. 28, for the annual “META: Mapping Education Towards Achievement.”

META 2015 will take place from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. The workshop includes two career path sessions during which Hispanic and bilingual professionals will share how their high school and college educations have contributed to their career success. META students will also receive information about higher education admissions, scholarships and financial aid processes, and related immigration law.

Reyes will deliver the keynote address from 12:35 to 1:15 p.m. in Room 450 of the Campus Center.

Planning for college isn’t easy for any high school student, and for Hispanic students, particularly those who would be first-generation college students, the process can be even more challenging because of cultural differences and language barriers. More than 90 percent of those attending the workshop will be the first in their families to attend college.

Event organizers said Reyes’ success in the arts and communication field and his Chicano/Mexican background give him a direct connection to META students as a role model and inspiration.

As a leader in progressive and radical music, Reyes combines cultural stories of resistance, raw hip-hop and inspiring poems to reach youth and elders alike, challenging the main social ills faced by communities of color.

“He is great at telling narratives that cause his audience to think critically about our perception of Latinos,” said Cindy Gil, coordinator of Hispanic engagement initiatives in the Office of Community Engagement at IUPUI. “He also highlights truths about the struggles and successes faced when seeking educational achievement in the U.S.

“META students will immediately identify with someone who shares a similar identity, history and experience as them while being empowered through the arts and education.”

Reyes will also teach a workshop session about poetry, creative writing and spoken word. Gil said that focusing on skills explored in that session will not only be useful for students’ future arts endeavors but will also strengthen their abilities to prepare for and succeed in college, and to advocate for themselves in their high schools and communities. Reyes will also lead a workshop at 6 p.m. Sept. 29 in Campus Center Room 409.

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, as well as representatives from the Consulate of Mexico in Indianapolis and the Office of Congressman Andre Carson, will deliver brief remarks during the workshop.

In addition to IUPUI, DePauw, Ivy Tech and IPS, META sponsors include La Plaza, Indiana Latino Institute, the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI and Butler and Marian universities.