More Hospitals Use the Healing Powers of Public Art

PJ-BW614_INFORM_G_20140818180034

‘Mike Kelley 1,’ video art by Jennifer Steinkamp at the Cleveland Clinic. The Cleveland Clinic Center for Medical Art and Photography

.

Researchers are learning more about the precise ways paintings and other works of art help patients and families in the healing process. With studies showing a direct link between the content of images and the brain’s reaction to pain, stress, and anxiety, hospitals are considering and choosing artworks based on the evidence and giving it a higher priority than merely decoration for sterile rooms and corridors.

“These are not just accoutrements or aesthetics anymore,” says Lisa Harris, a nephrologist and chief executive of Eskenazi Health, affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

With a $1.5 million budget from donors, she says, the health system commissioned 19 artists to create original works to support “the sense of optimism, vitality and energy” for the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital, which opened last December. “This is right down the fairway of what we need to be doing to promote health,” Dr. Harris says.

“Paths Crossed,” by Maine artist Aaron T. Stephan, is a large, spiraling wooden sculpture composed of six intertwined ladders suspended from the ceiling in the hospital’s two-story main concourse.

To Dr. Harris, it is a visual representation of the hospital’s approach to care, with “lives intertwined as we go from health to sickness and back to health again,” she says. People have reacted differently, she notes. “Some see it as DNA, and some see it as a roller coaster.”

Anne Berry, 81, says, “It makes me think of flying.” She visits the hospital for procedures and tests such as a mammogram and always takes time to look at the artworks. She has “white coat syndrome,” which makes her nervous about going to a doctor, but she says, “I have found the art and the environment at Eskenazi makes it less stress-inducing for me.”

Close to half of hospitals have arts programs, which include art therapy classes and musical performances, according to a 2009 report from the Society for Arts in Healthcare, now known as the Arts & Health Alliance.

Permanent art displays are most prevalent, and the trend continues to grow, says Steven Libman, outgoing executive director and now a consultant for the nonprofit.

Though many hospitals are in a budget crunch, funds for art are often provided by philanthropy, or built into construction budgets of new facilities.

For help with choosing art works, consultants, hospital curators and art committees turn to studies such as those gathered in the nonprofit Center for Health Design’s “Guide to Evidence-Based Art.”

Research suggests patients are positively affected by nature themes and figurative art with unambiguous, positive faces that convey a sense of security and safety.

Some studies have found that patients are likely to respond negatively to art with negative images or icons. Abstract art also often rates low in patient preferences compared with representational art.

One 1993 study found that patients exposed to a nature image experienced less postoperative anxiety and were more likely to switch to weaker painkillers than those who viewed an abstract image or no image.

A 2011 study found that nature images helped calm restless behavior and noise levels in two Texas emergency department waiting rooms.

A 2012 review of neuroscience studies published in the Health Environments Research & Design Journal found that images of fearful or angry faces, ambiguous subject matter, high novelty and unfamiliarity, lack of realism and sharp contours elicit negative emotional responses in the brain and suggested they should be avoided.

Hospitals aren’t shying away from art whose content is open to interpretation or might make patients reflect. In the spring 2014 issue of the same journal, the Cleveland Clinic reported that patients surveyed on its contemporary collection—which includes abstract and nonrepresentational imagery by some prominent artists—reported a significant positive effect on their experience and on mood, stress, comfort and expectations.

The study suggested patients may respond positively to the diversity of the collection and to other types of art in addition to nature art.

Still, says Iva Fattorini, a dermatologist and global chairwoman of the Cleveland Clinic’s Arts & Medicine Institute, the focus is on art that is “not disturbing, but uplifting and diverse.” The aim “is to take your mind away from the disease and replace the time you are losing inside hospital with some beauty.”

Some patients in its survey reported they were motivated to get out of bed to view the artwork. Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder reported the most significant positive improvement in mood.

One popular piece is “Mike Kelley 1″ by artist Jennifer Steinkamp; an illuminated video installation of a large tree that cycles through the seasons, changing color and moving as if in a breeze.

Heather Kreinbrink says when her daughter Allison had a stroke at age 12 in 2010 and was hospitalized for a week, she and her husband, Rod, found looking at the installation outside the children’s wing provided a sense of calm amid their fear and exhaustion.

“It ended up being something we would go to every day for peace and to come to terms with what was happening,” she says.

When Allison was discharged, her parents brought her to see it. “It made me think as I saw other kids being pushed in wheelchairs by their parents, how awesome it is to be able to have something like that to take your mind of everything you are going through,” says Allison, now 16. Each year when she returns for a checkup, she poses for a picture in front of the tree.

Jeffrey Rothenberg, an obstetrician and gynecologist and chief medical officer at Indiana University Health’s University Hospital, says he learned to make glass art himself as a stress reliever. He is chairman of a public art committee for Indiana University School of Medicine’s Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute that called on artists with ties to Indiana to create works for a building devoted to vision.

“People sent in a lot of great pictures, but some of them were blurry or misty mornings”—not the best visuals, Dr. Rothenberg says, for “people getting their eyes dilated so they can’t see.”

The committee has chosen a range of works aimed at promoting healing and providing comfort, mostly purchased and some donated after the works were selected, including a glass wall sculpture and mobile by Dr. Rothenberg that he donated. Images in health-care settings shouldn’t be shocking, Dr. Rothenberg says, yet “at the same time you don’t want something so boring and generic that people walk away.”

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., chooses art to create a “healing environment,” says Chrysanthe Yates, director of its Lyndra P. Daniel Center for Humanities in Medicine.

Despite artistic merit, not all works fit the bill. For example, the hospital passed on an option to display a show of works about the Vietnam War, “which were beautiful but very stark and for obvious reasons not appropriate,” she says.

Mayo also exhibits pieces on loan from Jacksonville’s Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens. The institutions are collaborating on a program for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients and their caregivers, who meet at the museum for conversations about art works as a means of soothing and relieving stress. A research study is planned to measure those effects.

Write to Laura Landro at laura.landro@wsj.com

 

TEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute Team Up for Free Ticket Giveway

TEDxIndianapolis and Entanglements LectureTEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute have teamed up for a free ticket giveaway for two inspiring and entertaining events during the month of October.

Just tweet or retweet this announcement between September 3 and September 8 with the hashtag #IAHITEDx, and you will be entered into our drawing to win a ticket to the Entanglements Lecture on October 8 and a ticket to TEDxIndianapolis on October 21.

The Entanglements Lecture is a new series that brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.  At the inaugural event on October 8, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and recipient of the TED Prize, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014. Tickets are on sale now. More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

More event details are below.


Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
$35 general admission | $15 students

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including SociobiologyThe AntsThe Diversity of Life,ConsilienceThe Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

logo image


TEDxIndianapolis
October 21, 2014 | 8:00-5:30
Hilbert Circle Theater
$69 early bird admission | $79 after Sept. 30

Like all TEDx events, TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014.Tickets are on sale now. 

More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

 

“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

2006094106

Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.

Herron alumnus’ paint hits the wall at Clowes and in exhibit at his alma mater

406081_w296

Sax on the Rocks, Deep Down Series, Artist:Phil O’Malley, Oil on Canvas, 12″ x 12″

INDIANAPOLIS — An upcoming solo exhibit at Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI includes a multimedia chronicle of the making of the “jaw-dropping” monumental painting going on display at Clowes Memorial Hall.

The Herron show, “The Moment of Conception?” features the work of Herron alumnus and Clowes artist-in-residence Phil O’Malley and runs Aug. 29 to Sept. 19 in the Marsh Gallery of Herron School of Art and Design, 735 W. New York St., on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The Herron show is a companion exhibit to O’Malley’s “Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder,”the 40-foot-tall by 20-foot-wide wall art that will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall, on the Butler University campus. The painting is available for public viewing during regular business hours for two years, beginning today.

“‘Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder,’ is the apex to my series of paintings known as ‘Deep Down,’” O’Malley said. “This series consists of paintings that are individual abstract visual representations of that amazing personal journey one experiences by going deep down inside to find the strength or the courage that it takes to accomplish something, get through something, or grow beyond something.

“Going deep down into all that muck, chaos and confusion can be an intimidating endeavor, but when we do, that journey can be beautifully awakening to yield incredible growth,” O’Malley said of personal experiences captured in “Finding Your Way” and other “Deep Down” pieces.

O’Malley earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Herron. He also studied interior design in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

His “Deep Down” series was spurred by selections of popular music from his formative years, translated via paint into vivid visual representations, the artist said.

Three videos chronicling the making of the Clowes painting will play continuously as part of the Herron show. The Clowes wall project is also being documented by local PBS station WFYI.

The Herron show also includes a sculpture, timeline sketches and drawings of parts of the painting. Herron alumni artists C. J. Martin, Naylor Musko and Steve Smolinski assisted with professional art production for the exhibit co-curated by O’Malley and Martin.

O’Malley created “Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder” on the stage at Clowes Hall with the support of the Clowes staff. Martin and Musko also were assistants on the Clowes project.

“We used 800 square feet of canvas, 20 gallons of acrylic primer and one dozen gallons of oil paints,” O’Malley said.

“The process included poured paint, sprayed paint, squirted paint, drawn paint, mopped paint and even some brushed paint. At times the canvas was tied on a batten and flown in (onto the stage) and flown back out (off stage) to assist with the application and flow of the paint.”

The result is “jaw dropping” both in terms of the sheer scale of the canvas and O’Malley’s “inventiveness to start with small sketches and synthesize and scale up and adapt to the viewer’s experience of the work from different angles and levels,” said Glennda McGann, Herron’s assistant dean of development and external affairs.

“This is a prime example of an artist’s ability to problem solve,” McGann said. “He even had to collaborate with crew members and invent a way to hang this huge painting.”

O’Malley estimates he has spent about 500 hours making both the Clowes piece and the art for the Herron exhibit.

Brunswick Billiards selects Herron graduate Colin Tury’s design for iconic Gold Crown pool table

colin_tury_2014

Colin Tury

INDIANAPOLIS — Brunswick Billiards has selected Herron School of Art and Design graduate Colin Tury’s design for the sixth iteration of its iconic Gold Crown pool table, the company has announced.

But don’t look now for detailed images of Tury’s gorgeous and sleek redesign of the pool table. That’s hush-hush until the official unveiling of the new Gold Crown, slated for the fourth quarter of 2015.

In a partnership between Brunswick and Herron’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, Herron furniture design students participated in a pool table design challenge that took place in the spring and early summer.

Tury was among three student finalists who went “above and beyond the call of duty” with their designs, said Brent Hutton, Brunswick’s president. “We couldn’t be happier with the outcome.”

Tury graduated from Herron School of Art and Design in May with a Master of Fine Arts degree in furniture design.

Brunswick had “three good days of discussion with internal and external people” about which of the final designs to choose, Hutton said. “It weighed on a lot of people’s minds that we could get this version to market sooner,” he added.

Cory Robinson, chair of the fine arts department and associate professor of furniture design, said the students and faculty alike enjoyed the design project.

Brunswick was so pleased with the experience that it increased the prize money for the second- and third-place designs from $500 to $1,000. Those prizes go to Sam Ladwig, Master of Fine Arts in furniture design Class of 2014, and Shelley Spicuzza, a second-year graduate student. In fact, Brunswick is planning to work with Ladwig and Spicuzza to bring their respective takes on the table to fruition in the future.

Tury, in addition to bragging rights, has earned a $2,500 prize for his winning design.

“When I found out I won, I was beyond excited,” he said. “It took a while to sink in, but the realities of this competition are amazing. The prize money is exciting, but the opportunity to refresh an icon for a well-known manufacturer and then have my name on it is just unbelievable. I could not ask for a better portfolio piece.”

Brunswick intends to include Tury’s name along with Herron’s in its branding of the new Gold Crown.

Herron Galleries host reception Friday, August 29

250px-HerronSoA

Herron School of Art and Design

A public reception will celebrate the beginning of the new academic year and the three shows filling the galleries at Herron School of Art and Design on Friday, August 29 from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Continuing through September 10th in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries is the 2014 Faculty Exhibition. This year’s exhibition is an exercise in eclecticism with faculty members exhibiting from a variety of departments. All tenured and tenure-track faculty, lecturers and program technicians were invited to participate

The Moment of Conception? is in the Marsh Gallery through September 19th. Phil O’Malley, B.F.A. ’07, has planned a “making of” exhibition, The Moment of Conception?, as a companion to the mid-August unveiling of his, 20’ x 40’ Finding Your Way: From Wander to Wonder, a monumental installation which will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall. The work is the pinnacle creation in a series called Deep Down. Its creation and installation is also being documented by local National Public Broadcast Service station, WFYI.

Katie Hudnall’s exhibition of current work, in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery through September 19th, blurs the lines between woodworking and furniture techniques and media and those of sculpture and drawing in a search for new and compelling ways to reach the audiences for these forms.

“The language of furniture, and of utilitarian objects in general, has greatly influenced these hybrids as I search for ways to directly interact with my viewers,” Hudnall said.

Claire Potter on Academics and the University of Facebook

DATE: 13 October 2014
TIME:
11:00-12:00
LOCATION:
IUPUI Campus Center, Room 268
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Dr. Claire Potter, “The University of Facebook”

What role does social media play in our careers as activist academics who are, to paraphrase psychologist Sherry Turkle, increasingly “alone together?” Social media is playing a crucial role in weaving together networks of academics across the oundaries of region, institutional status, and field. Conversations on Facebook simulate the comfort zone of the faculty lounge or the cocktail party after a Dr. Claire Potterdistinguished lecture. People share gossip, humor and express political views that merge with their scholarly interests.  But if crowd-sourcing a syllabus has the enormous advantage of staying in minute-by-minute contact with colleagues, what are the rules? And, if one’s house is no longer easily separated from one’s work space, under what conditions do we need to imagine our utterances on social media as occurring in the workplace too? Do academics have a lot to learn from teenagers?

About Dr. Claire Potter

Dr. Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. She has a BA in English Literature from Yale University and a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Dr. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012).  She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender Violence, and a collection of essays on academia in the digital age, Digital U: Why Crowdsourcing, Social Media, Word Press and Google Hangouts Could Save the Historical Profession.

Since 2007 Dr. Potter has written at Tenured Radical, a blog that moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011.

With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, Dr. Potter edits a book series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America, for the University of Georgia Press. Dr. Potter also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and is a co-director of OutHistory.org, re-launching its new website in October 2013.

Bradbury lecture celebrates master storyteller’s birthday and legacy

unnamed

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies Director Jonathan Eller with science fiction and fantasy magazines with Ray Bradbury stories, part of the Bradbury-Albright Collection.

INDIANAPOLIS — Professor Jonathan Eller, director of IUPUI’s Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and Chancellor’s Professor of English, will present the inaugural Bradbury Lecture at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20.

The lecture, in the West Reading Room of the Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St., is free and open to the public.

“Ray Bradbury in the Twenty-First Century” draws on the unique and extensive archives of the Bradbury Center, which is home to the iconic author’s papers, his working library, and a lifetime of his awards and mementos. These materials, recent gifts of the Bradbury family and the author’s longtime friend and bibliographer, Donn Albright, are part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

“Everybody knows a Ray Bradbury story,” Eller said. “Generations of school children and college students have read his work in hundreds of anthologies and textbooks; teachers and librarians continue to value his stories and his poetic, metaphor-rich style.”

Bradbury’s stories have a unique staying power in American culture.

“He published more than 400 stories,” Eller said. “And he wove them into such modern classics as ‘The Martian Chronicles,’ ‘The Illustrated Man,’ ‘The Golden Apples of the Sun,’ ‘The October Country,’ and two enduring titles that emerged from his Midwestern childhood: ‘Dandelion Wine’ and ‘Something Wicked This Way Comes.’ ‘Fahrenheit 451,’ his classic cautionary tale of censorship and book burning, remains a perennial bestseller more than 60 years after publication.”

Eller’s illustrated presentation will focus on two intriguing questions: How did Ray Bradbury, a child of the Great Depression who never attended college, become one of the best-known American writers of his time? And why does this master storyteller of the 20th century remain a powerful cultural influence today?

The inaugural Bradbury Lecture falls during the author’s birthday week, and Eller plans to schedule subsequent lectures each August as Bradbury’s centennial year — 2020 — rapidly approaches.

Eller said, “He was born in 1920, when the Martian Canals of Percival Lowell and Edgar Rice Burroughs were still high in the American imagination; he passed away in 2012, just as the Curiosity Rover was about to land on Mars, at a site named in Ray Bradbury’s honor.” The center’s holdings include artifacts that have orbited the Earth, and Eller’s lecture will also assess the author’s lasting impact on the American space program.

The timing of the first Bradbury Lecture is especially significant. “Ray Bradbury Unbound,” the second volume of Eller’s three-volume study of Bradbury’s life and career, will be published by the University of Illinois Press in early September. At the same time, Kent State University Press will publish volume two of the Bradbury Center’s “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury,” a series that recovers the seldom-seen original versions of Bradbury’s earliest published stories.

The Bradbury Lecture also kicks off a campaign to expand the Bradbury Center at IUPUI so that students, researchers and the general public can have better access to the archives and artifacts belonging to one of America’s premier storytellers.

The Bradbury Lecture is presented by the Indianapolis Public Library in conjunction with the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies. Parking for the Indianapolis Central Library is available via Pennsylvania Street in the library garage for a fee.

For more information about the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, call 317-274-2173 or visit the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies’ website.

Midwest meadows, Madrid, mapping influence October Herron exhibitions

UntitledBerkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries
Shawn Decker Prairie

Positioned at the intersection of music composition, visual art and performance, Chicago Artist Shawn Decker’s work uses physical and electronic media to investigate the natural and unnatural world.

By way of its most recent stop in Austria, his work Prairie will arrive at Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries with an opening artists talk and reception on September 26 beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Prairie is a large-scale kinetic sound sculpture. This installation presents visual elements that mimic prairie grasses as well as sound elements that evoke sounds of the prairie—from insects to wind playing in the grasses. The irony of a human construction with digital programming that ends up producing a meditative, seemingly natural environment is not lost on the artist.

Basile Auditorium
Artists Talk: Shawn Decker and Lanny Silverman

Joining Decker for a discussion of the current state of contemporary and avant garde art forms will be independent curator Lanny Silverman, formerly curator of exhibitions for the Chicago Cultural Center Department of Cultural Affairs.

Marsh Gallery
Lost in Translation:
Student Work from Herron’s Summer Study Abroad Program in Spain

Professors Anila Agha and Stefan Petranek not only conducted a summer scholarly excursion to Spain, the two will curate a showcase of student sculptures, drawings and photographs compelled by student travel experiences in Madrid and Barcelona. Some of the works were exhibited at the Makers of Barcelona gallery in June 2014, but this exhibit will include work created since the students’ return. Participating artists are: Helen ArthBrianna Campbell,Devan HimstedtJessica KartawichCarolyn KypchikChristine (Jazz) LongMary McClungEvan RiceBrittany Rudolf andHadia Shaikh.

Basile Gallery
Reagan Furqueron

A solo exhibition will feature new works by Director of Foundation Studies and Assistant Professor Reagan Furqueron that explore the ideas of transition and mapping through a sculptural approach to making—a departure from Furqueron’s usual making mode.

Study: “The Bible in American Life”

UntitledThe year 2011 marked the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible. It also marked the beginning of a three-year Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI ) study of the Bible’s place in the everyday lives of Americans.

With a $507,000 grant from Lilly Endowment Inc., the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture – a program of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI – set out to answer questions of how, where, when and why ordinary Americans use the Bible.

According to findings made public online in the 44-page “The Bible in American Life” report, the four-centuries-old King James Version of the Bible is far from dead. Despite its archaic language and a market flooded with newer, more modern English translations, more than half of the individuals and two-fifths of the congregations surveyed still prefer the King James Bible.

And of those surveyed, African Americans reported the highest levels of Bible engagement.

Seventy percent of all blacks said they read the Bible outside of public worship services, compared to 44 percent for whites, 46 percent for Hispanics and 28 percent for all other races.

Bible memorization is highest among black respondents, 69 percent, compared to 51 percent among white conservative Protestants and 31 percent among white moderate/liberal Protestants.

“There are no measures, individually or in congregations, where ‘black’ is not strongly correlated with the most conservative, most active, most involved level of scriptural engagement, no matter which other group comes closest,” the report says.

“If one wanted to predict whether someone had read the Bible, believed it to be the literal or inspired Word of God, and used it to learn about many practical aspects of life, knowing whether or not that person was black is the single best piece of information one could have.”

The report first looks at the practice of scripture reading in the United States, and then explores eight measures among those who read the Bible, such as Bible translation used; scripture memorization habits; favorite passages; and race.

Roughly half of Americans have read religious scripture outside of a public worship service in the past year. For 95 percent of those, the Bible is the scripture they read.

What did the study reveal about Bible readers?

Most of those people read at least monthly, and a substantial number – 9 percent of all Americans – read every day.

Women were more likely to read than men; older people were more likely to read than younger; Southerners were more likely to read than those of any other region.

The percentage of verse memorizers among Bible readers (48 percent) equates to roughly a fourth of the American population as a whole, or nearly 80 million people.

Psalm 23 – which begins “The Lord is my shepherd” – was the most popular Biblical passage.

Younger people, those with higher salaries and, most dramatically, those with more education among the respondents read the Bible on the internet or an e-device at higher rates.

The written report, based on survey questions on both the General Social Survey (1,551 individuals) and the National Congregations Study III (denominations represented among the General Social Survey respondents), is the first stage of the study and offers sociological data about the role of the Bible.

“Historians and sociologists have been working for years to understand how religion is lived out on a daily level,” said Philip Goff, executive director of the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture and one of the three principal investigators who led the study. “This gives us a good snapshot of the practice of Bible reading. That should also help ministers understand the people in their pews.”

Goff’s co-investigators are Arthur Farnsley, associate director of the center; and Peter Thuesen, chair of the Department of Religious Studies at IUPUI.

full article found here