Funding: Russell Sage Foundation Program on Social Inequality

Russell Sage Foundation Program on Social Inequalityth

Sponsor deadline
: January 5, 2016, Letter of Inquiry

The Russell Sage Foundation’s program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States.

Funding is available for secondary analysis of data or for original data collection. We are especially interested in novel uses of existing data, as well as analyses of new or under-utilized data. Proposals to conduct laboratory or field experiments, in-depth qualitative interviews, and ethnographies are also encouraged. Smaller projects might consist of exploratory fieldwork, a pilot study, or the analysis of existing data.

The Foundation encourages methodological variety and inter-disciplinary collaboration. All proposed projects must have well-developed conceptual frameworks and research designs. Analytical models must be specified and research questions and hypotheses (where applicable) must be clearly stated.​

Spirit and Place Festival | 1971: Paranoia, Surveillance, and the American Dream

1971 Film FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute presents the Spirit and Place Festival Event 1971: Paranoia, Surveillance, and The American Dream.

Date: November 10, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Location: Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E St Clair St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
Free tickets available here

During the 1960s and 70s, thousands asked why the American Dream was out of reach to so many. They organized. They protested. They sought to make America more equal—and entrenched interests fought back. The FBI, led by J. Edgar Hoover, spread paranoia and distrust by use of surveillance, infiltration, and misinformation. The documentary film 1971 tells the story of the protesters and the journalists who exposed COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and others.

Spirit and Place Festival Logo

After a screening of 1971, join in discussion with filmmaker Johanna Hamilton and Bonnie and John Raines, two of the individuals who broke into FBI offices in 1971 to bring truth to light.

Supported by the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial LibraryIndiana Humanities, and the Indianapolis Public Library.


Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights

IUPUI Arts And Humanities Institute presents a discussion on Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights.John and Bonnie Raines image

Date: November 9, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Location: Phoenix Theatre Indianapolis, 749 North Park Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46202
Click here for free tickets.

During the 1960s and 70s, thousands asked why the American Dream was out of reach to so many. They organized. They protested. They sought to make a more equal America and entrenched interests fought back. The FBI, led by J. Edgar Hoover, spread paranoia and distrust by use of surveillance, infiltration, and misinformation.

This event will introduce Indianapolis audiences to the story of a group of activists that broke into an FBI office in 1971. Their act of disobedience exposed COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and many others.

The eight individuals who took part in the burglary made their identities public in 2014. Two of them, John and Bonnie Raines, as well as Betty Medsger, the Washington Post reporter who broke the story, will be on stage to discuss the civil disobedience, civil rights, and the role of government surveillance in modern society.

Supported by the Phoenix Theatre and the Vonnegut Memorial Library.

Reiberg Reading Series: Amy Quan Barry

Amy Quan Barry FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Amy Quan Barry

Date: November 5, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI Library; 755 W. Michigan St.
Click here for free tickets

Amy Quan Barry is the author of the four poetry collections Asylum, Controvertibles, Water Puppets, and most recently Loose Strife. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Missouri Review, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, and other literary publications. She is the recipient of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize (for Asylum). Her third book, Water Puppets, won the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry. Her novel, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born, tells the tumultuous history of modern Vietnam as experienced by a young girl born under mysterious circumstances a few years before the country’s reunification.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series comes from the Reiberg family, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Reiberg Reading Series: Dan Wakefield

Dan WakefieldThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Dan Wakefield

Date: November 4, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St.
Get your free tickets here

A native of Indianapolis, Dan Wakefield is a novelist, journalist and screenwriter whose books include Revolt in the South, Going All The Way, New York in the Fifties, The Hijacking of Jesus: How the Religious Right Distorts Christianity and Promotes Prejudice and Hate, and many more. His best-selling novels Going All The Way and Starting Over were produced as feature films. He has recently edited If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young, a selection of commencement speeches by Kurt Vonnegut, a longtime friend.

Wakefield has been the recipient of a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism, the Bernard DeVoto Fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Rockefeller Grant for Creative Writing, and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has taught in the writing programs at Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Emerson College, The Iowa Writers Workshop, and is presently Writer in Residence at Florida International University in Miami. He has been a staff writer for The Nation, a Contributing Editor of The Atlantic Monthly, a Contributing Writer for GQ, a Contributing Editor of The Yoga Journal, and is on the advisory board of Image: A Journal of The Arts and Religion.

In 2015, NUVO awarded Wakefield the Lifetime Achievement Cultural Vision Award.

Sponsored by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of English, IUPUI University Library, IUPUI University College, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, IU School of Informatics, IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Lecture: McKinney panel to discuss national, international responses to refugee crises

INDIANAPOLIS — Responses to the world refugee crisis are the focus of an upcoming 482544_w296public panel discussion at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. McKinney School of Law will present “World Refugee Crisis? Domestic and International Responses” from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15 in the Wynne Courtroom of the law school building, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St.  The presentation is part of the McKinney Graduate Studies Lecture Series.

The informative panel discussion will address the domestic and legal frameworks for dealing with the issue of refugees, Bravo said. Panel members include Sam Sites, 2017 McKinney J.D. candidate, who through the law school’s Program in International Human Rights Law interned with the Legal Resources Centre in Accra, Ghana, and the Organization for Aid to Refugees in Prague. His internship assignments included weekly visits to a refugee camp and a refugee detention center. A better understanding of the world refugee crisis is invaluable for the typical American, Sites said.

“It’s important for Americans to have a better understanding of the world refugee crisis so that we can better aid refugees and countries that are helping them. Americans have always been generous, so it’s also important for them to know about organizations they can support to help refugees, even if they won’t necessarily meet any of the refugees,” Sites said. “There are many human-rights and refugee organizations that are based in the United States, so there are opportunities to serve and to respond within the U.S. You don’t have to travel or be fluent in a different language to help refugees.”

Other panel members are:

  • Mahja Zeon, deputy prosecutor, Marion County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Carleen Miller, executive director, Exodus Refugee Immigration Inc.
  • Bernard Trujillo, professor, Valparaiso University School of Law

The event is free, but registration is strongly encouraged. Additional information is available on the McKinney website.

Updates for Humanities Indicators

Over the past few months, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has been active inAmerican_Academy_of_Arts_and_Sciences_logo-prv its support for the humanities, with new reports on the employment status and earnings of humanities majors, the financial health of not-for-profit humanities organizations, metrics on the qualifications of school teachers, international comparisons of levels of adult literacy, and trends in public reading rates.

Key findings:

  • In 2013, the median annual earnings for humanities majors were $50,000 for those who held only a bachelor’s degree and $71,000 for those with an advanced degree (in any field). Both amounts were $7,000 below the median for graduates from all fields with similar degree attainment (but still well above the median of $42,000 for all U.S. workers).
  • The salary differential between humanities majors and graduates from most other fields shrinks with time in the workforce.
  • Humanities majors had somewhat higher rates of unemployment than graduates from all fields. The gap in unemployment narrows with time in the workforce and an advanced degree.
  • A comparatively large share of humanities graduates go into education-related occupations—especially among those with terminal bachelor’s degrees, where humanities majors are second only to education graduates.
  •  Among the 42% of undergraduate humanities majors who had gone on to earn an advanced degree, workers were more evenly distributed across occupational categories than majors in most of the other fields.
  • Revenues of humanities not-for profits have largely recovered from recession, but not all organizations survived.
  •  Less than 70% of students in each of several types of high school humanities classes were taught by a teacher with both a college major in the subject and state certification to teach it.
  •  While a growing number of recent humanities PhDs report their research was “interdisciplinary,” most confined their work within the humanities.
  •  The median time to PhD for students who paid for their education with personal savings or employer support was two years longer than the median for those who relied on scholarships, grants, and assistantships.
  •  An international study finds that literacy and occupational skill levels are highly correlated.

New in the Academy Data Forum:                                                                       

  • Christine Henseler (Union College) argues for a more expansive view of the value of the humanities.John Dichtl (American Association for State and Local History) and
  • Carole Rosenstein (George Mason University) discuss gaps in what we know about humanities nonprofits.
  • Barbara Cambridge National Council for Teachers of English) and Nancy McTygue (California History-Social Science Project) fill in gaps between the numbers on teacher on teacher credentials and classroom experience.
  • Jamie Carroll and Chandra Muller (University of Texas at Austin) assess what recent changed in the intended majors of college-bound seniors might portend for the humanities.


  •  The Lincoln Project releases a new publication to examine state funding of higher education and describes challenges that state governments face. (And in case you missed it, the first Lincoln Project publication was Public Research Universities: Why They Matter.
  •  50 years of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)In response to a bipartisan Congressional request, the Academy is initiating the first national study on foreign language learning in more than 30 years.
  •  We are pleased to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities—a vital sponsor for our work. The co-chair of the Academy’s Commission on the Humanities, Richard H. Brodhead (Duke Univ.), delivered the keynote address “On the Fate and Fortunes of Public Goods” at a symposium commemorating the event.


Grant Keeney, May graduate (B.F.A. in Furniture Design), went for playability and style in herron_posterhis designs when Brunswick Billiards asked for a new approach to table tennis. The purveyor of home game room products came back to Herron on the heels of its successful 2014 venture through the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life to create version six of the iconic Gold Crown billiards table. The winning design, by Colin Tury (M.F.A. in Furniture Design, ’14), is slated for production in 2017.

Keeney’s two concepts wowed Brunswick with their angles, clean lines and Mid-Century forms. “The legs fold up and the table folds in half, but you won’t want to put it away,” Keeney said, as he presented his prototype of the extruded aluminum “CL-1” table with soft-close accessory drawers for stowing the net, paddles and balls. His second design, the “Cornerstone,” features 360 degree pivoting casters built into the legs, and a low-slung, arched base. “There’s nothing out there like it close to this price point,” he said. “These designs target Millennials and everyone else.”

In addition to Herron faculty members, Brunswick representatives Brent Hutton (B.A. ’79 Bloomington), LifeFitness vice president of global consumer sales; John Kazik, vice president of business development; and Greg Tennis, manufacturing and sourcing engineer, were on hand for the April presentations from the six students who took on the challenge. Eighteen students had attended a March call for proposals where Hutton described the project in detail and called on them to bring their creativity to bear.

Brunswick also chose designs by seniors Ben Sallee and Vance Wilson as second and third place winners. The finalists earned $1,500, $1,000 and $500 awards, respectively, and each student who presented earned a stipend for their materials and time.

Cory Robinson, chair of the Department of Fine Arts at Herron, said, “For fine art and design students this kind of project is gold. Real professional practice that comes from working with an established company like Brunswick is not the same as a simulation.”

For this project, the school again brought in special expertise from Glen Fuller, who ran a customized class for the students who created designs for Brunswick. “Glen brings work experience as a professional industrial designer. He’s coming from a place of authority and put the students through their paces conducting in-depth market research on trends and competition in the leisure sports industry,” Robinson said.

Robinson encourages businesses that want to partner with Herron to begin the conversation well in advance. “The ideal situation is for us to accept a new project in the spring semester, so that we can use the summer to work on it as well, and then complete the assignment and present in the fall,” he said. “The businesses that partner with us seem very pleased and energized by the experience. They are learning something new, too.”