Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop

IU Logo
Thursday March 13, 2014
1:00 – 1:30 p.m.
UL 2120

The IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, Faculty Appointments and Advancement, invites you to attend the Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop.

Academics must provide evidence to demonstrate the impact and outcomes of their scholarly work. This hands-on workshop, facilitated by reference librarians, will help faculty explore various forms of documentary evidence to support their case for excellence. In addition, strategies for finding appropriate evidence and examples of effective documentation will be provided. If you haven’t already done so, you can register for this workshop by visiting the Academic Affairs webiste. Attendance is limited.

Prior to the workshop, attendees must set up Google Scholar and Researcher ID profiles. Links to each of these sites follow: Google Scholar, Researcher ID, and instructions for Google Scholar are attached for your reference.

We look forward to your interest and participation.

International Women’s Day celebration

intl womens day logo
Friday March 21, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium, University Library

This year International Women’s Day Celebration is scheduled for Thursday, 3/21, in the IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. It will open with a reception at 6:30 p.m., featuring local activists and a buffet of international eats, followed by a reading of Polish poet Agnieszka Kuciak’s rollicking _Distant Lands: An Anthology of Poets Who Don’t Exist_, a tour de force roster of made-up poets, performed by Andy Buchenot, Brandon Butcher, Stacey Emley, Chris Forhan, Gabe Harley, Terry Kirts, Keith Leonard, Jane Schultz, Susan Shepherd, Erica Swanfeldt Stout, Ben Van Wyke, and Jacqui Weeks.

If you’re interested in participating in the multicultural, multilingual open mike, contact Kelli Vorndran (klvorndr@umail.iu.edu) to reserve a slot. Reminder: Perform up to one page or poetry or a half page of prose–must be written by a woman. If you want to do a poem by a woman poet in another language, provide an English translation.

Virologist presents lecture on the emergence of the AIDS epidemics

photo preston marx
Wednesday March 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Emerson Hall, Room 304
545 Barnhill Drive

Professor Preston Marx will deliver a presentation entitled, “Emergence of the AIDS Epidemics: Transition from SIV to HIV.”

The sudden emergence of the AIDS pandemic in the 20th century raised questions about AIDS origin(s), including the timing and root causes. Research led to understanding that HIV/AIDS is not one pandemic, but rather a combination of multiple epidemics and failed outbreaks, alongside the well known pandemic. The sources of all HIVs are simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) on the African continent. Finding SIV and the evolution of SIV to HIV will be presented, along with prevailing theories on why AIDS emerged in the 20th century.

Marx is Professor of Tropical Medicine and Chair of the Division of Microbiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center of Tulane University. A virologist with over 40 years of experience in research on non-human primate models of AIDS vaccines and the origins of the AIDS epidemics, Dr. Marx’s research contributions include finding Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV’s) in sooty mangabeys in West Africa, showing this particular mangabey monkey sub-species as the source of HIV-2. Dr. Marx has conducted research projects in Sierra Leone, Gabon, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo. He recently published research in Science magazine showing that the SIV family of viruses is hundreds of thousands of years older than previously believed.

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program and the Indiana University School of Medicine Center for AIDS Research.

Pizza will be served. Questions? Please email ticarmic@iu.edu.

Jane Pauley to discuss new book

jane pauley photo

Former NBC “Today” show host Jane Pauley will bring inspiring stories of mid-life reinvention featured in her new book to the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus on March 14.

A familiar face on morning, daytime and prime-time television for more than 30 years, Pauley, an Indiana native who graduated from IU Bloomington, will sit down with fellow IU alumna Megan Fernandez, Indianapolis Monthly executive editor, to discuss her new book, “Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life.”

Pauley has become one of broadcasting’s most respected journalists — most recently, for the award-winning “Your Life Calling” segment (now titled “Life Reimagined Today”) on the “Today” show. In recent years, Pauley has crisscrossed the country meeting and profiling men and women in their 50s and older who see the future as an opportunity for reinvention rather than retirement.

Since the first episode, “The Joy of Socks,” aired in 2010 on NBC, Pauley has profiled 25 remarkable people whose personal reinvention informs and inspires. Now she brings these stories to the page, looking to inspire others to imagine their own future in powerful and positive ways.

“The people Jane writes about exemplify the spirit of the liberal arts tradition,” said Larry Singell, executive dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, where Pauley received a degree in political science in 1972. “When students prepare, in the liberal arts tradition, to question critically, act creatively and live ethically, they are ready to succeed at any number of careers and at any juncture in life.”

The event will take place at noon on March 14 in Room 450 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. A light lunch will be provided. Pauley will sign copies of her book after the interview.

The event, sponsored by the IU College of Arts and Sciences Alumni Board, is free to Indiana University Alumni Association members and $10 for non-IUAA members. Registration is required, and attendance is limited to the first 150 people who register.

‘Art & Copy’ film screening

art and copy flyer

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
7:00 p.m.

Basile Auditorium
Eskenazi Hall
735 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Art & Copy is a film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry.

The film received an Emmy on PBS Independent Lens for Outstanding Arts and Cultural Programming and was a selection at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, 2009 Toronto Film Festival and its’ director, Doug Pray, won the Best Director of a Documentary at the Atlanta Film Festival.

School of Informatics and Computing to participate in Passport to Hi-Tech

informatics logo

The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI is joining with other organizations Saturday, March 8, to teach girls about careers in science, technology, engineering and math at Conner Prairie.

The school will bring two activities to Passport to Hi-Tech at the interactive history park. The event is open to all ages but targeted to girls ages 7 to 12. Passport to Hi-Tech takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is free with paid general admission to Conner Prairie.

It will feature interactive exhibits and hands-on experiments designed to inspire girls to learn more about careers in STEM fields such as informatics, engineering, biology, chemistry, manufacturing, computer science and others. Passport to Hi-Tech was organized by Women & Hi-Tech and Conner Prairie. It is sponsored by Roche Diagnostics.

One of the School of Informatics and Computing’s activities is dubbed “Ready, Set, Compute!” Participants jump into computing and become a working part of a machine in a fast-paced game that shows what a computer does as friends play a game on it. When the players select a move, volunteer students will race to the CPU or other parts of the simulated device to deliver a signal for action, showing what goes on in a computer game.

The other activity will be demonstrating a Finch robot, a small, two-wheeled robot with bird-like features. Polly Baker, Ph.D., a professor of media arts and science in the Department of Human-Centered Computing, has programmed the robot so it can be controlled with hand gestures.

“The robot is approachable, and young people see they can control it,” said Vicki Daugherty, a school recruiting specialist. “It’s empowering. They say to themselves, ‘Hey, I can do this.’”

Summer research fellowship in archaeological and earth sciences

angel mounds project

Wanted: Academically talented university sophomores and juniors with an interest in both the natural and the social and behavioral sciences.

The assignment: Four weeks of paleoenvironmental and archaeological research in the Illinois and Ohio River valleys and four weeks of training in an IUPUI laboratory — with pay.

The Department of Anthropology and Department of Earth Sciences at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the Indiana Geological Survey and Department of Geological Sciences at Indiana University-Bloomington seek 10 undergraduates as research fellows for a program titled “Angel Mounds Research Experiences for Undergraduates Site: Multidisciplinary Training for Students in Environmental and Social Sciences through Archaeological Research.”

Students selected will participate in research examining the interplay among climate change, human settlement histories and agricultural impacts to landscapes over the past 2,000 years across the lower Midwestern United States. The Research Experiences for Undergraduates fellows will participate in every phase of the project, from research design and data collection to laboratory analyses, archival research and interpretation.

“While the research questions revolve around archaeological sites, regions and time periods, we encourage talented undergraduates with diverse majors and programs of study ranging from biochemistry, geology, environmental studies and biology to anthropology and geography to apply to our program,” said Jeremy J. Wilson, director of the Angel Mounds National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program and an assistant professor of anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

“Native Americans and members of other groups underrepresented in the social sciences, humanities and STEM disciplines are strongly encouraged to apply,” Wilson said.

The project runs June 2 through Aug. 1, with a one-week break for the Fourth of July holiday. Fellows will receive a $500 weekly stipend, housing and all necessary equipment. Participants will also receive an allowance to support travel to and from the Research Experiences for Undergraduates site and to attend the Midwest Archaeological Conference in Champaign, Ill., to present their research.

The objectives of the Angel Mounds program are to:

  • Provide students with field and laboratory training in archaeology, geochemistry and geophysics.
  • Give students an opportunity to build cohort and professional networks that will serve them throughout their careers.
  • Provide students an opportunity to participate in a project of regional and historical significance.

Applications for the summer program are available online.

Susan Sutton study abroad program awardees announced

Eric Raider and Claudia Grossman

A Department of World Languages and Cultures faculty member in the IU School of Liberal Arts and an academic advisor in the Kelley School of Business were chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Susan Buck Sutton awards. The IUPUI Office of International Affairs presents the awards to a campus faculty member and a staff member who made significant contributions to study abroad programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Claudia Grossman, a senior lecturer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center, and Eric Raider, a Kelley School of Business academic advisor, were presented their awards at the IUPUI International Festival on Feb. 27.

The award is named in honor of Susan Buck Sutton, who was the first associate vice chancellor for international affairs at IUPUI.

Selection of award recipients is based on efforts to promote a campus climate where students are encouraged to study abroad and new programs are developed and supported.

Grossman’s efforts were noted in a nominating letter that said, “It is hard to imagine today’s international landscape at IUPUI were it not for the extraordinary creativity and investment of time and energy that Claudia Grossman has spent over the last two decades on making study abroad a reality for many students and faculty across several schools on this campus.”

A list of Grossman’s accomplishments in the area of study abroad were cited, including study abroad program development, creation and instruction of courses connected with study abroad, program direction, student advising and publications related to study abroad.

Raider’s work to expand the undergraduate study abroad program at the business school was cited, with one nominator saying, “Eric took the reins of the Kelley undergraduate program and has not looked back. It is evident that Eric is passionate about study abroad and has already made a lasting impact on our programs in Kelley.”

Herron exhibition in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/ combines arts of performance, video, sound, sculpture

intersect promo image

Herron Galleries offer a breath of fresh air at the intersection of live performance, video, sound and sculpture

The end of March at Herron will offer a breath of fresh air in the Basile Gallery through in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/, an exhibition opening March 28 that encompasses live performance, video, sound and sculpture.

Visiting artist Daniel Cosentino, who is currently exhibits internationally from his homes in Kosovo and New York, draws upon philosophy to make artworks that accentuate the double meanings introduced by these media. His work includes references to antiquity and historic iconography. He’ll be joined by special guests from Herron’s Advanced Digital photography class, under the direction of Herron Professor Stefan Petranek.

in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/ will include pre-, live and post-opening components that explore intimacy and emotional memory expressed through electronic and physical aspects of modern interpersonal relationships. The exhibition runs through April 17.