Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture offers conference on how Bible is used

391697_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Registration is now underway for a national conference that will culminate a three-year Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of how — outside of religious services – - Americans use the Bible in their daily lives.

The Conference on the Bible in American Life will take place Wednesday Aug. 6, to Friday, Aug. 8, at the Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, 31 W. Ohio St., in downtown Indianapolis.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI is sponsoring the three-day event as part of the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Noted historian Mark Noll of the University of Notre Dame will deliver a conference plenary address. Noll will present “The Bible: Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7, at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle. Conference registration is not required for the plenary address, which is open to the public.

“While the Bible has been central to Christian practice throughout American history, many important questions remain unanswered in scholarship,” said Philip Goff, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which is part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Those unanswered questions include how people read the Bible for themselves, how denominational and parachurch publications have influenced interpretation and application, and how clergy and congregations have influenced individual understandings of scripture, the director said.

“These questions are even more pressing today, as denominations are losing much of their traditional authority, technology is changing people’s reading and cognitive habits, and subjective experience is continuing to eclipse textual authority as the mark of true religion,” Goff said. “Understanding both the past and the future of Christian communities in the United States depends, even if only in part, on a serious analysis of how these cultural shifts are affecting Americans’ relationship to the Bible.”

Earlier this year, the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture released a report about the Bible’s use based on a national survey of American Bible reading. During the upcoming conference, historians, sociologists, political scientists, seminary professors and religious leaders will offer analyses of the Bible in daily life that complement the report’s findings and will put those findings about the Bible’s use in a broader context.

Among the report’s many findings:

  • There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture (the Bible, the Quran, the Torah, etc.) in the past year and those who did not.
  • Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.
  •  Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.
  •  The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

Seating for the three-day conference is limited, and advance registration is required. Registration before July 15 is $50; after July 15 it is $70.

Open Society Foundations Invites Applications for Social Justice Photography Projects

logoThe Open Society Documentary Photography Project is accepting applications for photography projects that can be used as tools for social change.

The foundation’s Audience Engagement program supports projects that address a pressing social justice or human rights problems and provide concrete ways for photographers, organizations, and their target audiences to create positive social impact. Projects that inspire audiences visually, create meaningful interactions with an existing body of photographic work, and use photography as the basis for programming that moves people beyond the act of looking and directly involves them in activities or processes that lead to social change are encouraged.

Beginning this year, the program offers two tracks of support for individuals at different phases of their audience engagement projects:

1) Project Development: Grantees will receive funding to attend an Open Society–organized retreat in December 2014. The event will be designed in collaboration with Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program, whose nationally recognized workshops provide participants with essential practical tools and strategies to help them move their project and career goals forward. Attendees will become part of a larger Audience Engagement grant cohort, with opportunities to connect both during the conference and after.

2) Project Implementation: Grantees will receive grants of up to $30,000 to execute (or continue executing) their projects as well as attend the December retreat.

Proposed projects should include partnerships between photographers and organizations recognized as tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Each project partner should have the skills and track record to realize the project and must commit time and resources to implement it.

See the Open Society Foundations Web site for eligibility and application guidelines.

Conference Fund

The Office of Academic Affairs is pleased to announce matching support for academic conferences or symposia organized by faculty members or professional staff and convened in Indianapolis [preferably at IUPUI] between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Those events that bring external audiences to IUPUI will be given preference. Awards will be made up to $1,500, if matched equally by the school or department.

Requests must predate the conference or symposium by at least one month. The Office of Academic Affairs will review submissions and make awards. Successful applicants will acknowledge IUPUI support in all publicity and in any publications resulting from the conference or symposium.

Brief proposals (not exceeding two pages) should be submitted with the completed application form, and should include:

  • topic, objectives, and description of the conference or symposium
  • venue
  • summary (up to one paragraph) of the background of each prospective and/or confirmed speaker or key participant
  • expected outcomes of the conference (impacts across the IUPUI campus, press releases, proceedings, publications)
  • budget: categories include honoraria, food, lodging, travel, and supplies (awardees should consult with Research and Sponsored Programs to determine allowable expenses for receptions or social events)

Please submit IUPUI Conference Fund applications to Melissa Lavitt, Ph.D., Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs [mlavitt@iupui.edu] in the Office of Academic Affairs, AO126.

The IUPUI Conference Fund Proposal Form for 2014-2015 is available here.

Mack Center Call for Fellowship Applications

facet-full-logoThe Mack Center enhances teaching by advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Administered by FACET, the center stimulates inquiry in SoTL, promotes the results of those inquiries, and fosters educational excellence at Indiana University and internationally.

The Mack Center:
Supports SoTL research by Mack Fellows and other faculty to develop highly effective, evidence-based strategies for enhancing teaching and learning; sponsors conferences, workshops, and publications that develop faculty members’ and graduate students’ teaching skills and share knowledge about SoTL; nurtures the growth of university, state, and global communities of teacher-scholars; and collaborates with people and programs worldwide–including FACET initiatives such as the Future Faculty Teaching Fellows Summer Institute and journals–to advance the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

FELLOWSHIPS

Become a Mack Fellow
Each year the Mack Center selects a group of fellows to conduct ambitious research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and to participate in our community of SoTL scholars.

Mack Fellows receive $1000 in initial research funds and $1000 after they complete their project and submit a paper to a scholarly journal.

For the complete call for submissions, follow this link: https://facet.indiana.edu/about/mack-center/call-for-mack-fellow.pdf

If you need additional information, contact, Beth Kern, at (574) 520-4352 or bkern@iusb.edu

FACET
755 W. Michigan Street, UL 1180, Indianapolis, IN 46202
https://facet.indiana.edu/

What matters. Where it matters.
Indiana University

Grant Writing Workshop: IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program

DATE: September 3, 2014
TIME: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
LOCATION: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Conference Room, University Library 4th Floor

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the New Frontiers grants advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Register here:

Digital Arts & Humanities Workshops for 2014-15

Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop LogoAre you interested in creating a professional blog but don’t know where to start? Have you ever wished that you had the skills to visualize your research data? Do you want to know how to use social media to share your work with the public? The Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop is a new series presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship. It will provide hands-on training in skills such as scholarly social media and blogging, data mining, data visualization, online exhibitions, and more. This year, our workshops are targeted to beginners, so please take this opportunity to plunge into the fascinating world of the digital arts and humanities. Workshop events are free to IUPUI faculty, research staff, graduate students, and local non-profit professionals. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your place as soon as possible.


 

“Introduction to Data Visualization I: Visualization with Gephi” 9 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to basic data visualization with Gephi. Attendees will become familiar with the Gephi interface and will emerge with basic of Gephi’s applications. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-data-visualization-i-visualization-with-gephi-tickets-12090774833


“Introduction to Data Visualization II: Data Normalization for Network Analysis in Gephi” 16 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to network analysis with Gephi. Network analysis allows researchers to analyze and visualize qualitative and quantitative relationships between objects, people, and groups. This workshop will focus on how to capture and organize data so that Gephi can visualize network relationships. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-data-visualization-ii-network-analysis-in-gephi-tickets-12090929295


“Introduction to Scholarly Blogging” 6 November 2014, 12:00-2:00, UL 2120

There is a robust and growing community of scholars who share their research through blogging platforms such as WordPress, Blogger, and Drupal. Not only is blogging a way to engage with the public, but it is becoming increasingly important in creating and sustaining scholarly networks and communication. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have a blog up and running on WordPress.com, and they will understand the fundamentals of sharing information, building networks, and engaging with the public. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-scholarly-blogging-tickets-12090995493


“Social Media for Scholars” 11 March 2015, 12:00-1:30, UL 2120

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit. What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research? As it turns out, quite a bit. Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-media-for-scholars-tickets-12091039625

IU experts discuss federal court rulings concerning same-sex marriage bans in Indiana and Utah

25868212_BG1A federal district judge has ruled that Indiana’s ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional, allowing for the immediate issuance of marriage licenses Wednesday in a state that earlier this year saw a contentious debate in the legislature about amending the Indiana constitution to include the ban. A federal appeals court also ruled on Wednesday that Utah must allow same-sex couples to marry, making it the first time a federal appeals court has taken action on the controversial issue.

Experts from Indiana University offer the following insights:

A historic event for same-sex couples, families in Indiana
A strategy of ‘shock and awe’
Consistent with a trend across the nation
Rulings likely to increase Americans’ support of same-sex marriage
Question is no longer whether but when

A historic event for same-sex couples, families in Indiana

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Deborah Widiss, associate professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law, said that the striking down of Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban is a historic event for same-sex couples and their families in Indiana.

“Indiana now joins the quickly growing number of states where courts have held that state bans are unconstitutional,” Widiss said.

She said the court correctly held that marriage is fundamentally important, and that there is not a good reason to deny same-sex couples access to marriage. Since Judge Richard Young did not issue a stay on his ruling, Indiana same-sex couples have already been issued marriage licenses in Marion County throughout the day, as well as in other Indiana counties, paving the way for equal marriage rights for all in Indiana.

Widiss conducts research on employment law, family law, legislation, gender and gender stereotypes. To speak with her, contact Ken Turchi at 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu, or Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

A strategy of ‘shock and awe’

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Steve Sanders, associate professor of law at the Maurer School of Law, said states like Indiana have had only one remaining argument to justify their bans against same-sex marriage: that the purpose of marriage is to incentivize heterosexuals not to procreate irresponsibly.

“Historians and family law scholars have regarded this argument as dubious,” Sanders said. “And today it was rejected by [Federal District] Judge Young as well as the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals.

“The movement for legal same-sex marriage has been pursuing a strategy of shock and awe, filing as many lawsuits as possible and racking up an unbroken string of victories in the federal courts. Today’s rulings in Indiana and the 10th Circuit are part of this larger landscape. Indeed, it may have been more noteworthy if the decisions had gone the other way.”

Sanders can be reached at 734-904-2280 or stevesan@indiana.edu. For additional assistance, contact Ken Turchi at 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu, or Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

Consistent with a trend across the nation

INDIANAPOLIS — Jennifer Drobac, professor of law at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, said today’s federal court decision to strike down Indiana’s gay marriage ban is completely consistent with the direction in which other U.S. court decisions are headed.

“[Indiana] is about a year behind from what the federal government is doing,” Drobac said. “This is a decision that could have been predicted based on the fact that so many courts have been ruling in this way across the nation and in the Supreme Court’s strike down of DOMA last summer. There’s nothing surprising or shocking here.”

Drobac said the ruling provides significant changes in Indiana family law. It allows married same-sex couples to protect their families in a way that all other married couples can in Indiana. In turn, this avoids numerous problems with legal orphans or children left without child support in same-sex dissolutions of marriage.

“This is simply consistent with a trend across the nation: recognizing marriage as a fundamental right of all loving couples that want to formalize their commitment and protect their families,” she said.

Drobac is a professor at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Her research areas include family law, juvenile law and sexual harassment law. She can be reached at jdrobac@iu.edu  or at 317-278-4777. Top

Rulings likely to increase Americans’ support of same-sex marriage

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana is not the first state to have its same-sex marriage ban struck down by a federal judge, yet the ruling here is all the more significant considering the contentious debate earlier this year about making Indiana’s ban a constitutional amendment, said Indiana University sociology professor Brian Powell.

“If you look at Indiana and nearby states, you see a stark difference,” he said. “While Illinois legislators approved legislation allowing same-sex marriage, Indiana legislators were debating about becoming the last state to move toward a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.”

Powell has conducted several nationally representative surveys of Americans’ opinions of family and same-sex marriage, beginning in 2003, and has watched support for same-sex unions grow 2 percent to 2.5 percent a year, which he describes as surprisingly speedy for such a controversial social issue. According to Powell, “court decisions such as today’s ruling likely will serve to further increase Americans’ support for same-sex marriage.”

He also noted that “same-sex marriage may prove to be an economic boon for the state of Indiana.” Same-sex marriage could generate millions of dollars in spending for the Indiana economy and could be important in the recruitment and retention of highly skilled employees, especially in businesses such as Eli Lilly and Cummins and in universities.

The reasons states give to justify their constitutional bans have often focused on the benefits to children. Powell’s public opinion research has found, however, that opposition to same-sex marriage does not stem from concerns about children but instead is mostly rooted in religious and moral beliefs. Because groups of people cannot legally be treated differently based on moral or religious beliefs, states had to offer other justifications for their same-sex marriage bans.

“The great irony is that during the political debates, the people who are opposed to same-sex marriage express moral disapproval, but that cannot be a legal basis for law.”

Powell is the Rudy Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington and can be reached at 812-360-0474 or powell@indiana.edu. For additional assistance, contact Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

Question is no longer whether but when

INDIANAPOLIS — With Wednesday’s ruling on same-sex marriage, it is becoming increasingly clear that the question is not whether same-sex marriage will be recognized nationwide, but when that will happen, according to IU McKinney School of Law professor David Orentlicher.

“Since December, federal judges in Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Texas — and now Indiana — have ruled that same-sex marriage bans violate the U.S. Constitution, and past decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court indicate that arguments against same-sex marriage ultimately will fall short,” Orentlicher said.

“Although the Supreme Court once deferred to a legislature’s moral judgment about personal relationships and other social practices, that is no longer the case. The government needs to identify tangible harm from the conduct. A ban on same-sex marriage must rest on something more than public morality.

“Opponents of same-sex marriage have wrongly argued that children are better off being raised by opposite-sex couples than by same-sex couples. That argument misreads the empirical evidence on parenting, misjudges the role of government, and it misconceives the function of marriage.”

David Orentlicher is the Samuel R. Rosen Professor of Law at IU Robert McKinney School of Law and co-director of the William S. and Christine S. Hall Center for Law and Health, a unit of the McKinney School of Law, which is on the campus of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Orentlicher holds an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. He is an adjunct professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, also at IUPUI. To reach Orentlicher for interviews, call 317-658-1674 or email dorentli@iu.edu.

CDC selects Stephan Viehweg for second term as Act Early Ambassador

46700085INDIANAPOLIS — Stephan Viehweg, associate director of the Riley Child Development Center at the IU School of Medicine and interim director of the IUPUI Center for Translating Research Into Practice, has been selected a second time to serve as an Act Early Ambassador for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Learn the Signs. Act Early” program.

He will play an important role in educating Indiana’s parents, health care professionals and early educators about early childhood development; warning signs of autism and other developmental disabilities; and the importance of acting early on concerns about a child’s development.

Developmental disabilities are common in the United States. A recent study shows that about 1 in 6 children has been diagnosed with a developmental disability. It’s important that these children are identified early and that they and their families receive the services and support they need.

“This campaign seeks to help parents and their caregivers to identify developmental delays at the youngest age possible to help these kids catch up to be ready for school,” Viehweg said. “As Indiana’s ambassador, I will be promoting the use of the free materials and learning opportunities.

“I will be offering workshops at various statewide conferences and meetings; working with systems to include the ‘Learn the Signs. Act Early.’ materials to parents, families and community members; and collaborating with Indiana’s network of programs, providers and parent organizations in a collective effort to increase awareness of autism and other developmental delays and link children and their families to assessment and services.”

Viehweg completed an 18-month term as an Act Early Ambassador in April. He was selected recently through a competitive process to complete a second, two-year term.

According to the CDC, Viehweg was selected because of his commitment to improving the lives of children and families and increasing access to services for children with developmental disabilities. The Act Early Ambassadors project is designed to develop a network of state-level experts to improve early identification of developmental delay and disability. It is a collaborative project of CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, and the Association of University Centers on Disabilities.

Fashion Design course among fall electives

UntitledIn response to many requests from IUPUI students, Herron School of Art and Design is happy to offer “Fashion Design” this fall. The three credit-hour elective will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 p.m to 8:30 p.m. in room 261 of Eskenazi Hall.

 Jo Dean Tipton, a fashion and textiles designer, entrepreneur and professional in the fashion industry, will instruct. Tipton has designed costumes for dance, gymnastics and cheerleading, as well as textile prints. She has taught fabric painting in a workshop

in Taos, New Mexico, and worked with textiles as a fine art medium. Tipton just completed her master’s degree Apparel Design from Ball State University. She studied as an undergraduate at the Fashion Institute of Technology and Purdue University. Most recently,

she exhibited last April in the group show Shaping Visions in the Cultural Arts Gallery in IUPUI’s Campus Center.

The course will explore design principles that are the foundation of creating marketable ideas and designs for the fashion industry.  Students will learn how designs are transformed into products, apply design principles and elements to solve design problems and communicate creative concepts effectively. Students will also produce technically accurate and aesthetically pleasing designs that communicate their ideas visually, investigate and select resources to support the design and solve a given problem independently.

 Enrollment is limited to the first 18 students.

HER-E 220  EXPLORING ART (3 CR)  32809

Variable Title course: FASHION DESIGN

Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Herron School of Art and Design room 261

 

For questions, please contact Anita Giddings, agidding@iupui.edu or 278-9492

IUPUI to significantly bolster its journalism/public relations program

Indianapolis bachelor’s/master’s program moves from Bloomington-based School of Journalism management to IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

SLA at IUPUI logoINDIANAPOLIS — Graduate and undergraduate journalism and public relations students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will have access to an array of new resources beginning July 1, when the long-established Indianapolis location of the IU School of Journalism shifts management from IU Bloomington to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The program will be known as the IU Department of Journalism and Public Relations at IUPUI.

The move comes as the IU School of Journalism at Bloomington merges on July 1 with the Department of telecommunications and Department of Communication and Culture to form The Media School.

With the transition to local oversight, the IUPUI journalism department will now offer students and faculty additional resources in academic and career advising, curriculum development, research funding, alumni engagement, philanthropic support and more.

School officials also envision partnerships with other departments and schools on campus — such as telecommunications, informatics, event management, medicine and athletics — to further enhance journalism and public relations programs focusing on sports and health/life sciences, and to give students the versatility needed in a rapidly changing profession.

“We’re honored to have our roots in the 100-year-old IU School of Journalism,” said Jonas Bjork, who will become the first chair of the new department. “But as one of IUPUI’s smallest schools, we didn’t have the depth of resources we needed to take our program to the next level. This move — reinforced by unanimous support from our faculty and staff — will help us achieve that.”

Bill Blomquist, dean of the School of Liberal Arts, said the merger is tailor-made for an urban-serving institution in a capital city ripe with professional opportunities.

“The skills and thinking we teach in journalism and public relations –– the ability to search out and explain information — are much in demand among all kinds of employers,” Blomquist said. “Developing those professional skills, along with the versatility instilled by liberal learning, will help prepare our graduates not only for their first jobs but also for the careers that follow.

“What’s more, in this city full of sports, health, life science, government and other communication opportunities, our classroom learning is supplemented and complemented by real-world learning — internships, service projects, guest speakers and more — that you can’t match anywhere else in this state and in few places around the nation.”

Bjork said the name change — to include public relations — is a decision based on the changing nature of the profession and the marketplace.

“While journalists and public relations professionals are, in many places, treated as adversaries, many of the theories and practices we teach journalists and public relations professionals are, in fact, complementary,” Bjork said. “Often, the two groups of professionals must work together, so it helps that we teach them together here at IUPUI with faculty members who bring real-world experience to the table.”

The new Department of Journalism and Public Relations will offer bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and certificates in journalism and public relations with specializations available in sports journalism, health/life science public relations, advertising and other areas.