Kress Foundation invites applications for scholarly European art projects

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History of Art Grants Program
  • Supports scholarly projects that will enhance the understanding and appreciation of European art and architecture.
  • Grants are awarded to non-profit institutions with 501(c) 3 status, based in the United States, including supporting foundations of European institutions.
  • These are competitive grants. Please see ‘Past Grants’ and ‘Annual Reports’ for past awards and typical levels of funding and review our Grants FAQs for answers to common application questions.
  • In addition to submitting printed materials, applicants must include a CD containing a complete set of the application materials. The materials on the CD must be presented as a single PDF document.
  • Application Deadlines*: January 15, April 1, and October 1

The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.

Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.

For full application guidelines, visit the Kress Foundation website.

“Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?” | Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series

Dr. James Lynch Jr.Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?
Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series
Presented by: Visiting Scholar James W. Lynch Jr, MD, FACP

When: Wednesday April 2, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Co-sponsored by the MHHS Spirit of Medicine Program. Free CME/CE Credit Offered

Objectives:

  1. Articulate the various forces shaping how we think about the relationships between faith and medicine in the 21st century.
  2. Discuss how the term “professionalism” can be distorted to undermine compassion and empathy as parts of healthy physician-patient relationships.
  3. Describe the ways practitioners address their own spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) in relation to patients and their beliefs.
  4. Identify how to address complexities that arise in discussing spiritual issues with patients or in choosing not to discuss them.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided.  Food and drinks are NOT permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

About the Lecturer:

Dr. Lynch received his BA from the University of Virginia and MD from Eastern VA Medical School in 1984.  After internal medicine training at the University of Florida, he did his training in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda MD.  In 1991 he returned to the UFCOM and has served in multiple roles during this tenure including, course director in Oncology, program director for hematology/oncology, section chief of hematology/oncology at the VAMC and now serves as the Assistant Dean for Admissions.  He is a nationally recognized and  published expert in the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas. He has received multiple teaching awards including clinical teacher of the year 4 times, the Hippocratic award three times, is a member of the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and in 2006 was honored by the University of Florida as one of 5 Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  He was co-founder with his wife of the Christian Study Center at the University of Florida and serves as its board president. He and his wife Laura, have 4 children and 3 grandchildren.

The Spirit of Medicine Reading and Discussion Program is funded by an IU Health Values Grant. This three-year program available to IU medical students includes monthly meetings to discuss seminar readings and opportunities to meet with thought leaders in spirituality and medicine.  Participants also attend lectures presented by notable visiting scholars and enjoy the opportunity to engage scholars in further conversations.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.  Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration.  Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org or (317)962-1721.  For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit our website at www.fairbankscenter.org.

Contact:

Amy R. Chamness-Douthit
Program Coordinator- Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics
Indiana University Health (www.iuhealth.org)
Noyes E-130|317.962.1721 (office)|317.962.9262 (fax)
(website) www.fairbankscenter.org

 

Featured Posts

Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop

IU Logo
Thursday March 13, 2014
1:00 – 1:30 p.m.
UL 2120

The IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, Faculty Appointments and Advancement, invites you to attend the Documenting Impact and Reputation in the Humanities workshop.

Academics must provide evidence to demonstrate the impact and outcomes of their scholarly work. This hands-on workshop, facilitated by reference librarians, will help faculty explore various forms of documentary evidence to support their case for excellence. In addition, strategies for finding appropriate evidence and examples of effective documentation will be provided. If you haven’t already done so, you can register for this workshop by visiting the Academic Affairs webiste. Attendance is limited.

Prior to the workshop, attendees must set up Google Scholar and Researcher ID profiles. Links to each of these sites follow: Google Scholar, Researcher ID, and instructions for Google Scholar are attached for your reference.

We look forward to your interest and participation.

International Women’s Day celebration

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Friday March 21, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium, University Library

This year International Women’s Day Celebration is scheduled for Thursday, 3/21, in the IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. It will open with a reception at 6:30 p.m., featuring local activists and a buffet of international eats, followed by a reading of Polish poet Agnieszka Kuciak’s rollicking _Distant Lands: An Anthology of Poets Who Don’t Exist_, a tour de force roster of made-up poets, performed by Andy Buchenot, Brandon Butcher, Stacey Emley, Chris Forhan, Gabe Harley, Terry Kirts, Keith Leonard, Jane Schultz, Susan Shepherd, Erica Swanfeldt Stout, Ben Van Wyke, and Jacqui Weeks.

If you’re interested in participating in the multicultural, multilingual open mike, contact Kelli Vorndran (klvorndr@umail.iu.edu) to reserve a slot. Reminder: Perform up to one page or poetry or a half page of prose–must be written by a woman. If you want to do a poem by a woman poet in another language, provide an English translation.

Virologist presents lecture on the emergence of the AIDS epidemics

photo preston marx
Wednesday March 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Emerson Hall, Room 304
545 Barnhill Drive

Professor Preston Marx will deliver a presentation entitled, “Emergence of the AIDS Epidemics: Transition from SIV to HIV.”

The sudden emergence of the AIDS pandemic in the 20th century raised questions about AIDS origin(s), including the timing and root causes. Research led to understanding that HIV/AIDS is not one pandemic, but rather a combination of multiple epidemics and failed outbreaks, alongside the well known pandemic. The sources of all HIVs are simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) on the African continent. Finding SIV and the evolution of SIV to HIV will be presented, along with prevailing theories on why AIDS emerged in the 20th century.

Marx is Professor of Tropical Medicine and Chair of the Division of Microbiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center of Tulane University. A virologist with over 40 years of experience in research on non-human primate models of AIDS vaccines and the origins of the AIDS epidemics, Dr. Marx’s research contributions include finding Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV’s) in sooty mangabeys in West Africa, showing this particular mangabey monkey sub-species as the source of HIV-2. Dr. Marx has conducted research projects in Sierra Leone, Gabon, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo. He recently published research in Science magazine showing that the SIV family of viruses is hundreds of thousands of years older than previously believed.

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program and the Indiana University School of Medicine Center for AIDS Research.

Pizza will be served. Questions? Please email ticarmic@iu.edu.

Jane Pauley to discuss new book

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Former NBC “Today” show host Jane Pauley will bring inspiring stories of mid-life reinvention featured in her new book to the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus on March 14.

A familiar face on morning, daytime and prime-time television for more than 30 years, Pauley, an Indiana native who graduated from IU Bloomington, will sit down with fellow IU alumna Megan Fernandez, Indianapolis Monthly executive editor, to discuss her new book, “Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life.”

Pauley has become one of broadcasting’s most respected journalists — most recently, for the award-winning “Your Life Calling” segment (now titled “Life Reimagined Today”) on the “Today” show. In recent years, Pauley has crisscrossed the country meeting and profiling men and women in their 50s and older who see the future as an opportunity for reinvention rather than retirement.

Since the first episode, “The Joy of Socks,” aired in 2010 on NBC, Pauley has profiled 25 remarkable people whose personal reinvention informs and inspires. Now she brings these stories to the page, looking to inspire others to imagine their own future in powerful and positive ways.

“The people Jane writes about exemplify the spirit of the liberal arts tradition,” said Larry Singell, executive dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, where Pauley received a degree in political science in 1972. “When students prepare, in the liberal arts tradition, to question critically, act creatively and live ethically, they are ready to succeed at any number of careers and at any juncture in life.”

The event will take place at noon on March 14 in Room 450 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. A light lunch will be provided. Pauley will sign copies of her book after the interview.

The event, sponsored by the IU College of Arts and Sciences Alumni Board, is free to Indiana University Alumni Association members and $10 for non-IUAA members. Registration is required, and attendance is limited to the first 150 people who register.

‘Art & Copy’ film screening

art and copy flyer

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
7:00 p.m.

Basile Auditorium
Eskenazi Hall
735 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Art & Copy is a film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry.

The film received an Emmy on PBS Independent Lens for Outstanding Arts and Cultural Programming and was a selection at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, 2009 Toronto Film Festival and its’ director, Doug Pray, won the Best Director of a Documentary at the Atlanta Film Festival.

School of Informatics and Computing to participate in Passport to Hi-Tech

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The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI is joining with other organizations Saturday, March 8, to teach girls about careers in science, technology, engineering and math at Conner Prairie.

The school will bring two activities to Passport to Hi-Tech at the interactive history park. The event is open to all ages but targeted to girls ages 7 to 12. Passport to Hi-Tech takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is free with paid general admission to Conner Prairie.

It will feature interactive exhibits and hands-on experiments designed to inspire girls to learn more about careers in STEM fields such as informatics, engineering, biology, chemistry, manufacturing, computer science and others. Passport to Hi-Tech was organized by Women & Hi-Tech and Conner Prairie. It is sponsored by Roche Diagnostics.

One of the School of Informatics and Computing’s activities is dubbed “Ready, Set, Compute!” Participants jump into computing and become a working part of a machine in a fast-paced game that shows what a computer does as friends play a game on it. When the players select a move, volunteer students will race to the CPU or other parts of the simulated device to deliver a signal for action, showing what goes on in a computer game.

The other activity will be demonstrating a Finch robot, a small, two-wheeled robot with bird-like features. Polly Baker, Ph.D., a professor of media arts and science in the Department of Human-Centered Computing, has programmed the robot so it can be controlled with hand gestures.

“The robot is approachable, and young people see they can control it,” said Vicki Daugherty, a school recruiting specialist. “It’s empowering. They say to themselves, ‘Hey, I can do this.’”