Lecture: Philanthropy expert Ken Prewitt to discuss ‘Do charitable foundations make a difference?’ at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — America’s 86,192 charitable foundations frequently receive both praise Kenneth Prewitt Imageand criticism for their efforts to create change. Are they really making a difference? Former Rockefeller Foundation executive, foundation scholar and Columbia University Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs Kenneth Prewitt will explore the topic “Can Foundations Know If They Are Making a Difference? Navigating between Ivory Towers and Performance Metrics” during a talk at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis next week.

The program, presented under the auspices of the Stead Family Chair in International Philanthropy at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, will begin with a 5 p.m. reception followed by Prewitt’s lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10, in the lower level of the Lilly Auditorium at University Library, 755 W. Michigan St., on the IUPUI campus.

Prewitt’s talk will be followed by a panel discussion with local philanthropy leaders and faculty, including:

  • Dewayne Matthews, vice president of strategy development, Lumina Foundation
  • Christie Gillespie, vice president of community impact, United Way of Central Indiana
  • Catherine Herrold, assistant professor of philanthropic studies, IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

Prewitt, the former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, argues that it is increasingly important for foundations to effectively track, measure and share whether the work they fund actually helps make a difference, and he deems insufficient the current reporting methods used by U.S. foundations.

Prewitt previously has written that “significant, specific achievements can be attributed to foundation grantmaking” but also notes, “Although not wishing to subtract from the worthiness and social significance of these achievements, skeptics might ask … how we can assess the magnitude of social change in relation to the funds spent.'”

“The debate about whether and how foundations’ impact can be measured is a long-standing but important conversation,” said Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean of the school. “Ken Prewitt’s research, thought leadership and insightful questioning of how we assess foundations provide context to help philanthropic institutions evaluate their impact and consider whether adjusting or rethinking metrics could enhance the services they fund and provide.”

The event is free and open to the public; RSVPs are requested.

IUPUI Professors Debut BIG TENT Performance Concept at Indianapolis Museum of Art

Date: November 7, 2015Big Tent Image at Indianapolis Museum of Arts
Time: 12:30 PM-5PM
Location: Toby Theater at the Indianapolis Museum of Arts

INDIANAPOLIS — Robin Cox and Benjamin Smith will pitch their unique Big Tent for its public debut on Saturday, Nov. 7, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Toby Theater.

Cox and Smith, music and arts technology professors in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, are co-creators of Big Tent, a portable space designed for multimedia performance using the latest in audio and visual technologies.

Big Tent is a 40-foot-diameter octagon composed of 12-foot-high video-projection walls to showcase 360 degrees of art and other visuals, an array of audio speakers, and a central computer core to facilitate interaction between the acoustic and electronic performance.

Like circus tents of the previous century, Big Tent may be taken to a parking lot, a lawn, or a high school gym to transform that space into a multimedia art-and-performance venue.

The first Big Tent performance takes place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. and features multimedia works by Cox, Smith, Herron School of Art and Design student Danielle Riede, Sharon Zhu, and more.

The second show of the day will be a production of Hourglass, a community-participation work Cox created to encourage dance movement through performance of a composed arc of music. It will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. and feature visuals by Smith, Shawn Goodman on bass clarinet, Cox as violinist and Stephanie Nugent as dance facilitator.

In addition to the Nov. 7 events, IMA will host a third Big Tent performance from 5 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 28 as part of the museum’s “Silent Night” presentation.

Cox and Smith are hopeful that Big Tent will become a marketable invention. They foresee a continuing development process and contributions coming from a wide variety of creative talents.

Supported by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology, the Indianapolis Opera, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Funding: IDOA Project Management Services for the Development and Implementation of an Expressive Arts Program for Long Term Care Facilities

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3638Indiana University Logo
IU Internal Deadline: 11/9/2015
IDOA Application Deadline: 12/9/2015

Brief Description:
In order to improve engagement of nursing home residents resulting in improved quality of care and quality of life, the Indiana State Department of Health, Health Care Quality, and Regulatory Commission needs project management services for the development and implementation of an expressive arts program for long term care facilities. The program will be designed to provide education, training, tools, and support for immediate implementation following completion of the expressive arts course. The program will focus on the use of arts through movement, drawing, painting, sculpting, writing, music, or acting as interventions or approaches to help create a sense of content and well-being for residents. The vendor will develop an Expressive Arts Course and an Expressive Arts Train-the-Trainer Course. The end goal of the course will be to provide project leaders with the skills needed to implement expressive arts programs in long term care facilities.

Award Amount:
Award Varies: Each proposal should contain the Respondent’s best terms from a price and technical standpoint. The term of the contract shall be for a period of two (2) years from the date of contract execution. There may be two (2), one-year renewals for a total of four (4) years at the State’s option.

Limitation: One per Indiana University

No more than one proposal per Respondent may be submitted.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 9, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0994 Notice of Intent.

  • Project Narrative, not exceeding 2 pages (excluding references and figures).
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Panel and Workshop: RISE Day

Date: November 6, 2015IUPUI Logo
Time: 10:30 AM-2:30 PM
Location: University Library, Lilly Auditorium
Get your free tickets here.

RISE Day will be a gathering of students, faculty/staff, and community partners that will include a keynote address by Dr. Paul Mullins, lunch, a student poster session highlighting a variety of RISE experiences, and a Q&A panel featuring RISE instructors and community partners.

The conference will be followed by a student workshop about how to market RISE participation to employers and graduate schools. Registration for the workshop is separate.

The RISE to the IUPUI Challenge initiative engages students more deeply in their learning and contributes to their intellectual and professional development in unique ways. Each undergraduate student is challenged to include at least two of the four RISE experiences—research, international, service learning, and experiential learning—into their degree programs.

The RISE to the IUPUI Challenge initiative enhances the teaching and learning process that occurs during formal classroom course work. The initiative builds on IUPUI’s long tradition and commitment to experiential learning. Each RISE category incorporates qualified experiences, integration of knowledge, reflection, and assessment and will be documented on students’ transcripts.

The IUPUI undergraduate educational experience is distinctive because it intentionally uses experiential learning to prepare students for graduate school, careers, and citizenship. It provides skills, knowledge, and experiences that are highly prized by employers and establishes the foundation for future leaders.

Workshop: Applying for National Science Foundation Funding

Date: November 13, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM–11:00 AM
Location: University Library, Lilly AuditoriumIUPUI Library

Join the “Ins and Outs of Applying for NSF Funding” workshop from 9 to 11 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 13, in University Library’s Lilly Auditorium. The workshop will provide an overview of the foundation, its mission, its priorities and NSF programs that cut across disciplines. Specific topics include a description of various funding mechanisms and their appropriateness for each career stage, attributes of high-quality proposals, and resources available within the university to support proposal development.

Representatives from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the Office of Research Administration and NSF awardees on the IUPUI faculty will focus on how to prepare and submit grant proposals to the NSF. Highlighting the event is a panel discussion by current NSF reviewers who will provide an in-depth look into the peer-review process.

$100,000 Transformational Impact Fellowship goes to Herron Professor Greg Hull for patient-based digital art project

Herron School of Art and Design Professor Greg Hull’s collaborative proposal for the Installation of a work by senior Jenn Brown (in scissor shirt) at IUPUI University Library.“Touchstone Project,” which would produce digital works made of light and controlled by input from hospital patients, earned a $100,000 Transformational Impact Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Hull, whose work has often included the use of projected light, teaches sculpture. He is one of the first two people to earn the new two-year fellowship, funded by Lilly Endowment Inc., announced at the Arts Council’s annual Start With Art luncheon on September 4.

Hull’s collaborators include Assistant Professor Juliet King, director of Herron’s graduate Art Therapy Program, and Dr. Robert Pascuzzi, chair of the Department of Neurology at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

The project will provide a way for patients—including those with limited mobility because of neurological conditions such as ALS and Parkinson’s disease—“to interact with and generate engaging imagery that they can experience and change in real time, as well as potentially share with a larger audience,” said Hull.

He and his partners hope to give the patients who participate a sense of identity, autonomy and confidence through the art, as a way to combat the depression and anxiety that often come with such a diagnosis.

The project outcome will be works created in response to data collected from patient sensors and translated through an artist-designed interface. The works can be displayed on monitors or projected at varying scales and experienced privately by the patient or publicly in an installation space.

“This project will open new avenues for partnership across disciplines. It’s an honor to be part of pioneering work that can help people, and perhaps, with further research, become a tool for art therapists everywhere,” said King.

Shannon Linker, vice president of the Arts Council said, “The new Fellowship gives artists the opportunity to be at the center of the project, not brought in as an afterthought. Many artists have an altruistic nature that constantly seeks to better their surroundings. These partnership-based projects allow artists to create something meaningful in keeping with their art practice, but also fulfill their need to positively impact their community.”

Linker said that the Arts Council collected “63 submissions from artists and artist teams working in literary and visual arts, dance, music and theater. Within those submissions there were hundreds of artists and partner groups involved in thinking about amazing ways art can help transform a place or idea.”

Colleagues from arts service organizations in Miami Beach, Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati and South Miami Beach formed an e-panel to select the finalists. They did not know the fellowship applicants.

“The e-panel narrowed down the submissions and came up with their own concerns and highlights. Then the grants committee of our board of directors interviewed the lead artist for each finalist project and asked some tough questions—questions that came from the e-panel as well as questions that related to Indianapolis and our community specifically,” Linker said. “The panelists were especially drawn to the proposal Hull put forward because of his team’s potential impact on the world of Art Therapy.”

The Arts Council will be documenting the progress of both fellows (Brian Fonseca of Phoenix Theater is the other award recipient) over the course of the two years and plans to share highlights via video and other means. “The impact may be hard to measure at first,” Linker said. “We understand that this project may just be the beginning of a magnificent idea that will grow over many years.”

Discussion: Vietnam War protestors, reporter to share story of how they exposed FBI secret surveillance program

Date: Monday, Nov. 9, 2015John Raines, Vietnam Protestor and Activist
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00Pm
Locaton: Phoenix Theater, 749 N. Park Ave.

INDIANAPOLIS — It was 1971. The nation was gripped by anti-war and civil-rights protests.

John and Bonnie Raines were part of an eight-member group Bonnie Raines, Vietnam Protsor and Activistof anti-Vietnam War protestors who broke into an FBI office outside of Philadelphia and stole as many as 1,000 documents. The group leaked the files to journalists, who used them to produce months of headlines. The stolen documents would expose COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis and many others.

The Raineses will take the stage in Indianapolis next month to share their story of civil disobedience, civil rights and the role of government surveillance in modern society during a public panel discussion. A related film will be shown the next day at the Central Library location of the Indianapolis Public Library.

Betty Medsger, the Washington Post reporter who broke the COINTELPRO story and revealed the identities of the burglars in her 2014 book, “The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI,” will join the Raineses for the panel discussion, titled “Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights,” from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 at the Phoenix Theater, 749 N. Park Ave.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is the event’s sponsor. Free registration is available online.

Lecture: Celebrated digital computer artist Jason Seiler to speak at IUPUI Oct. 29

Date: October 29, 2015Jason Seiler cover illustration for Time magazine
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Room CE 450B in the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

INDIANAPOLIS — Jason Seiler, perhaps the most celebrated digital computer artist in the world, will speak at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Oct 29. The event is free and open to the public.

Seiler, whose caricatures and illustrations have been featured on the covers of Rolling Stone, Billboard, Time, The New Yorker and many other publications, will discuss his work and demonstrate the illustration techniques he uses in Photoshop.

The presentation will take place in Room CE 450B in the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 6 p.m.

“For anyone involved in the digital computer arts field, this is a rare opportunity to see and meet a living legend who is still delivering new digital art daily,” said Dan Baldwin, director of computer graphics technology in the School of Engineering and Technology’s Department of Computer Information and Graphics Technology.

The department and the student chapter of SIGGRAPH IUPUI are hosting the event. The artist will sign copies of his book, “The Complete Artist: A Guide on How to Succeed in the Creative Industry,” following his presentation.

Seiler is a Chicago-based artist who studied fine-art illustration at the American Academy of Art in Chicago for two years before beginning his professional work in earnest.

In addition to illustrations, Seiler has worked with Imaginism Studios, including as a character designer on Tim Burton’s “Alice In Wonderland,” helping create such characters as the Red Queen, the Tweedles and the Bandersnatch. Most recently, Seiler painted six stamps for the United States Postal Service’s Forever series.

Seiler illustrates for publications digitally using a Wacom Cintiq, the same technology the Computer Information and Graphics Technology department installed in the first full lab of Wacom Cintiqs at IUPUI.

IUPUI University Library honored for digital archiving of 120-year-old African-American newspaper

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library was unnamedamong the honorees as the nation’s fourth-oldest surviving African-American newspaper celebrated its 120th anniversary.

The Indianapolis Recorder, a weekly newspaper, marked 12 decades of publication with an awards ceremony and a reception Oct. 15 at the Indiana State Museum. More than 200 people attended the public event, “The Art of Storytelling.”

The newspaper presented 20 awards honoring “the legacy of those individuals who have played a monumental role in the continuing mission and vision of the paper to educate and inform generations of readers to come.” Honorees included the paper’s creators, columnists and staffers, and longtime community supporters.

University Library’s award recognized its service in digitizing the archives of the Indianapolis newspaper. The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection provides access to the paper’s 1899-2003 editions. The Recorder is the longest-published African-American paper in Indiana.

“We believe we are one of the first African-American papers in the nation to be digitized,” said Victoria Davis, the Recorder’s newsroom manager.

Newspapers and print publications in general, especially black publications, have faced challenges with digitalization, Davis said. Having the University Library collection has been invaluable to the Recorder’s readers, who have been able to look up family history, research community events and reflect on historical events through the collection, she said.

“A lot of people use it, and they are really excited that they can do that from the comfort of their own home using the computer,” said Davis, who anticipates the library-newspaper collaboration producing a second project.

“We hope to have our sister publication, The Indiana Minority Business Magazine, digitized as well,” Davis said.

The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection currently is the library’s most popular digital collection, averaging about 50 visits and 1,000 pages downloaded each day, according to a library audit. The Recorder collection is one of more than 80 digitized cultural-heritage collections available online through the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Recorder was founded in 1899 by George P. Stewart and William H. Porter as a two-page church bulletin.

University Library Dean David W. Lewis and Jenny Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian, attended the event and accepted the award for the library.

“We are really honored to be a part of such an important community resource. The Indianapolis Recorder is the most significant resource that documents the African-American community in Indiana,” Lewis said. “The award is a recognition of a really good partnership. They trusted us with their content in a way that is not typical. The award shows that we earned the trust they put in us. ”

The library’s award is a framed collage including the cover of the Recorder’s commemorative book, the ceremony invitation and a replica of the paper’s front page with a story thanking the library for its contribution.

Other Recorder anniversary honorees included Amos Brown, award-winning radio host and columnist; Arthur Carter, Tuskegee airman; Mari Evans, poet and author; Wilma Moore, archivist with the Indiana Historical Society; and Barbara Turner, descendant of founder George Stewart.