Laura Holzman, Modupe Labode, and Mary Price to discuss “The Value and Values of Public Scholarship”

Indiana Humanities LogoFebruary 24, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
755 W. Michigan St.

The 21st-century research university is no ivory tower.  It is a vibrant space that cultivates creativity and experiment — a space that encourages and supports multiple ways of knowing and doing.  Public scholarship is an essential pillar of the 21st-century university, building bridges and partnerships between the institution and the many publics with which its members engage.  This roundtable will engage with the following questions. What is public scholarship? What roles does it play in research, creative activity, and teaching?  What misconceptions do people have about public scholarship? How should universities evaluate public scholarship in promotion and tenure? How does one become a public scholar?

Dr. Laura Holzman is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art in Art History in the Herron School of Art and Design and in Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Modupe Labode is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of African American History and Museums in History and Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Mary Price is the Faculty Development Director in the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and an Associate Faculty member in Anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

Award-winning novelists and poets headline Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI

Emily Gray Tedrowe

Emily Gray Tedrowe

The Spring 2015 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis kicks off Thursday, March 5, with Emily Gray Tedrowe reading from her works, including the recently published second novel, “Blue Stars.”

Tedrowe’s first novel, “Commuters,” was listed as a Best New Paperback by Entertainment Weekly, an IndieNext Notable pick and a Target Breakout Book. Tedrowe also has published work in the Chicago Tribune’s Printers Row Journal, “Fifty-Two Stories, and Other Voices.”

All readings will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Lilly Auditorium, University Library, 755 W. Michigan St, unless otherwise noted.

Other series events, open to students, faculty, staff and the general public, include:

  • Thursday, March 12 — 16th annual “International Women’s Day: A Celebration” with poetry, music and visual art to honor the creativity of women around the world. Program includes an opening reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by featured performers at 7 p.m. and a multicultural, multilingual open mic at 8:20 p.m.

 

  • Michelle Herman

    Michelle Herman

    Thursday, April 2 — Essayist and fiction writer Michelle Herman, whose works include a collection of novellas, “A New and Glorious Life.” Her essay collection “The Middle of Everything, Stories We Tell Ourselves” was longlisted for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay.

 

 

  • Dana Roeser

    Dana Roeser

Thursday, April 16 — Dana Roeser, the author of three books of poetry including her latest, “The Theme of Tonight’s Party Has Been Changed.” Roeser is also author of “In the Truth Room” and “Beautiful Motion,” each winners of the Samuel French Morse Prize and nominated for the 2010 Poets’ Prize.

The Reiberg series was founded in 1997 by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI to honor department chair Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The series annually brings national and regional writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

Visitor parking for the readings is available in the North Street Garage, 819 W. North St.; the Vermont Street Garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.; and the Sports Complex Garage, 875 W. New York St.

The Spring 2015 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series, hosted by the Department of English, is made possible by the support of the Reiberg family; and IUPUI’s Office of Academic Affairs; University Library; University College; Office for Women; and Women’s Studies Program.

For additional information, contact Terry Kirts or by phone at 317-274-8929. Facebook users can “like” the series page at The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series @ IUPUI.

Bessie House-Soremekun reveals “The Africa the World Seldom Sees”

Bessie House-Soremekun

Bessie House-Soremekun

Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun analyzes the production of knowledge about African Societies by interrogating the multifarious stereotypical images of Africa often presented by network television, radio, popular media, movies and novels. These images often encapsulate static narratives and encoded messages that diminish Africa’s historical and contemporary contributions to the world. In many cases, Africa is still projected as a static “other” that has not embraced change and development. Dr. House-Soremekun compares these interpretations to earlier conceptualizations of African people and their cultures which were depicted by the Europeans during the era of imperialism and colonialism. She also probes the various ways in which peoples of the African Diaspora are continually affected by these images and are marginalized in the era of globalization when modern technologies daily project these images to many countries of the world.  This lecture supplements “The Africa the World Seldom Sees” Art Exhibition, which is on display at the IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery in February 2015.

Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun is the Director of Africana Studies, Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies, Public Scholar in African American Studies, Civic Engagement, and Entrepreneurship, and the Founding Executive Director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.  She has published 6 books and numerous scholarly articles and book chapters.

February 19, 2015 | 12:00-1:00
IUPUI Library, Room UL 4115P

Click here for free tickets!

Indianapolis police chief, Marion County prosecutor to discuss at IUPUI events surrounding deaths of black men in Ferguson and Staten Island

4fac0697bd0ac.preview-300

Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Richard Hite

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry

Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Richard Hite, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry and other local officials will participate in a panel discussion at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis about events surrounding the deaths of two black men last year in Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, New York.

With thoughts and emotions in IUPUI students still stirred by those events, the Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community and the Office of Student Involvement at IUPUI arranged the discussion to address the question: Could Indianapolis be next?

The panel discussion will take place from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Feb. 18 in the Campus Center Theatre, 420 University Blvd., said Alice Hoenigman Jones, a learning and program development consultant in the Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community. The event, planned in collaboration with Martin University, is free and open to the public.

Indianapolis City-Council President Maggie Lewis and Indianapolis deputy mayor and Republican mayoral candidate Olgen Williams also will participate in the discussion. An African American clergy member and an individual whose family suffered gun violence have been invited to participate. Those attending the discussion will have the opportunity to ask questions.

In Ferguson, Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed on Aug. 9, by Darren Wilson, a white police officer. The shooting prompted protests that roiled the area for weeks. In November, the St. Louis County prosecutor announced that a grand jury decided not to indict the officer. The announcement set off another wave of protests.

In Staten Island, on July 17, Eric Garner died after a police officer put him in a chokehold. In December, a Staten Island grand jury dismissed all potential charges against the police officer.

The panel discussion follows a town hall and a march that were held last fall at IUPUI that demonstrated widespread interest in the issues surrounding the deaths in Ferguson and New York.

For more information about the event, contact Alice Hoenigman Jones.

Partnership links to global opportunities

Four IUPUI faculty and staff members who are involved with international opportunities for students attended Oktobertfest in the fall: from left, Jennifer Williams, Pat Fox, Claudia Grossmann and Terri Talbert-Hatch.

Four IUPUI faculty and staff members who are involved with international opportunities for students attended Oktobertfest in the fall: from left, Jennifer Williams, Pat Fox, Claudia Grossmann and Terri Talbert-Hatch.

A partnership linking the School of Engineering and Technology and the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts has given four IUPUI students intriguing international experiences as they prepare to graduate in 2015.

A dual-degree program between the engineering school and German, Spanish and French language programs opened the doors to the internships. Three of them, Brian Knip, Eduardo Salcedo and Jesus Roman, worked with the Bosch Engineering Group in the small town of Abstatt. The fourth, C. J. Nielsen, worked at the University of Heilbronn. Both Abstatt and Heilbronn are located in southern Germany.

Knip, Salcedo and Roman tested their skills and knowledge in Bosch’s research and development department as part of an international group of engineering professionals, researchers and interns. Nielsen worked at an engineering lab alongside graduate students. All but Knip are part of IUPUI’s motorsports engineering program; Knip majors in mechanical engineering.

Claudia Grossmann, director of IUPUI’s German program, said the time abroad has an impact on the students.

“They gain new language, technical and intercultural skills, and gain on a personal level, as well,” Grossmann said. “They learn how to take care of themselves in another culture. As interns, they don’t have as much support as they are used to, so they have to deal with a wide range of practical experiences. That’s invaluable.”

Terri Talbert-Hatch, the assistant dean of student services in Engineering and Technology, knows the dual-degree program allows students to prepare for professional careers while benefitting schools at the same time.

“It helps us develop partnerships with other universities and with businesses,” she said. “Last year, for instance, an official from Bosch Motorsports in Detroit heard about our dual-degree program, and the talented students who were involved, and wondered why the company’s Detroit site didn’t have a similar program.” That has opened a discussion that may lead to opportunities in the U.S.

Both Grossmann and Talbert-Hatch have led student delegations to Germany, and have seen how the trips affected IUPUI students.

“Students figure out pretty quickly how studying abroad can benefit them in internships and career opportunities,” Talbert-Hatch said, noting a wealth of connections linking the U.S. and Germany in engineering fields.

Knip said he learned a lot during his time abroad, not all of it technical.

“Throughout my internship, I discovered both what I enjoyed and disliked about the possible careers available for mechanical engineering graduates,” he said. That knowledge has given him a stronger focus on his career goals as he applies and interviews with prospective employers.

The dual-degree program has been around for a decade, and Grossmann believes that internship prospects in German companies fit well with the language she teaches.

“We have a good following from engineering students, who often are interested in German engineering and want to take advantage of what they can learn,” she said.

“Engineers tend to look at things a little differently, and doing an internship in Germany allows them to experience technology that is just as advanced, but in a different culture,” Grossmann added. “The language immersion and engineering work enrich each other.”

By Ric Burrous

Herron art exhibit features the exchanges of pen pals with paint brushes

Art students Jessica Casey of Herron and Rachel DiCioccio of Youngstown State exchanged these paintings.

Art students Jessica Casey of Herron and Rachel DiCioccio of Youngstown State exchanged these paintings.

The official name of the exhibit running through Feb. 21 at Basile Gallery at the Herron School of Art and Design is “Material Muse.”

But perhaps “Pen Pals With Paint Brushes” more accurately describes the true inspiration behind the exhibit on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The paintings on display are exchanges between students in professor Danielle Riede’s painting class at Herron and art students taught by Youngstown State University professor Dragana Crnjak.

Eighteen sophomores and juniors from Riede’s class were paired with Youngstown State students. They exchanged original paintings. As if they were pen pals conversing by letters, a Herron student would complete an original painting and mail it to her or his partner at Youngstown, who would in turn create and mail back an original piece in response.

“We wanted a way for our students to collaborate on paintings and didn’t have big enough budgets to take all of our students to each other’s campuses,” said Riede, associate professor of art at Herron.

“We also wanted students to explore the possibilities of painting as a medium,” she said. “Collaborating in this way also opens up students to risk, which is a necessary ingredient for growth.”

All the mailed paintings were between 2 and 5 inches square. Riede recommended her students create 10 pieces and then pick a favorite to ship to Youngstown in Ohio.

“At the time most of us had not worked on such small paintings.  I was excited to try something new,” student Amy Applegate said. “I ended up sending five of my 10 pieces — two works on cardboard, a small abstraction on canvas, a whited-out promotional button and a painting on a scrap of particle board.

“My response piece was another formal experimentation using bottle caps, magnets and acrylic paint. I pulled my color palette and natural iconography from the (Youngstown) piece I was responding to,” Applegate said.

While it was perhaps hard for her students to let go of their creations, “on the other hand, opening the works that had been shipped was a really fun experience,” Riede said. “The YSU students’ paintings felt like gifts for the (Herron) students; they were so curious to open the other students’ works.”

Herron student Jessica Casey was “super-excited about the idea of collaborating and working long distance with other students in the region.”

“I sent two small mixed-media collage pieces using paint skins, drawing materials, plastic, fabric and sewing,” Casey said. “My hope (was) to inspire the person receiving the work to create something with an array of materials.

“I received a large shell covered in paint; I altered it with wire and then on canvas did gestural drawings of the shell in chalk. I then used oil, acrylic, latex and melted wax to build up mass on the canvas and create an interesting depth on the surface,” Casey said.

The Basile Gallery is in IUPUI’s Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St. Gallery hours are 10 to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is free and open to the public.

IUPUI 11th Annual International Festival Features Richard Kiely and Susan Sutton

unnamedYou are invited to join us at the IUPUI International Festival on Thursday, Feb. 19th and the concurrent International Lecture Series!

Speakers include Dr. Richard Kiely, Director of Engaged Learning & Research at Cornell presenting on “Facilitating Transformational Learning in Global Service-Learning: Lessons Learned in the Field” and “Toward a Critical Global Citizenship: Opportunities and Challenges,” as well as Dr. Susan Sutton, Senior Advisor for International Initiatives at Bryn Mawr College, presenting “The Internationalization of Higher Education: How Today’s Landscape Differs from the Past.”

Dr. Richard Kiely, is an expert in adult learning and well known for his research on international service learning program design and assessment, intercultural learning, transformative student learning outcomes in service learning, and critical global citizenship.
Dr. Susan Buck Sutton is Senior Advisor for International Initiatives at Bryn Mawr College, and formerly served as Association Vice Chancellor of International Affairs at IUPUI, Associate Vice President of International Affairs and Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University.

Lecture series hosted in partnership with the Center for Service & Learning and the Department of World Languages & Cultures

Additional lectures throughout the festival hosted by the Department of World Languages & Cultures!

View full festival schedule

 

IUPUI Africana studies program presents first Heritage Week

The Africana Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will inaugurate the first Africana Studies Heritage Week Feb. 9 to 13.

The weeklong celebration will feature a series of public lectures; panel discussions; an art exhibit curated by Bessie House-Soremekun, professor and director of Africana studies; a book signing by Ronda Henry Anthony, public scholar of African American studies and undergraduate research; and film viewings based on the theme of “Reconnecting the African Diaspora to Africa.”

“It is entirely fitting and important for us to establish Africana Studies Heritage Week as one of the important traditions that we will celebrate yearly at IUPUI,” House-Soremekun said.

“We are delighted that we will celebrate the creation of black studies/Africana studies as a viable discipline in academia and pay tribute to the numerous contributions of Africa and of African-descended people who reside in the African Diaspora as part of the broader Black History Month activities. Africa is the birthplace of humankind as we know it and has been central in the development of global civilization processes. Our goal is to expose students, faculty and members of the broader community as a whole to these important issues.”

The Heritage Week celebrations will kick off Monday, Feb. 9, with a lecture featuring Dawn Batson, the former chair of the Department of Visual & Performing Arts at the Florida Memorial University and former chair of the National Steel Orchestra of Trinidad and Tobago, as the keynote speaker.

The event begins at 11:40 a.m. in Room 104 of Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St., with introductions from House-Soremekun and Khalilah Shabazz, director of the IUPUI Multicultural Center. Batson will speak from noon to 12:45 p.m.

As part of the Heritage Week observance, House-Soremekun will present an art exhibit and lecture, “The Africa the World Seldom Sees.” Using African artwork from her personal collection, as well as photos she took when she served as a faculty host on the “Treasures of East Africa Tour” to Tanzania and Kenya in 2014 (sponsored by the Indiana University Alumni Association), House-Soremekun will challenge stereotypical images of Africa often presented in popular culture by presenting a compelling counter-narrative that illuminates many positive attributes and beauty of African society.

The art exhibit is open for public viewing Feb. 9 to 28 in Taylor Hall, Room 101.

“The inaugural Africana Studies Heritage Week features a full line-up of very interesting and enjoyable events,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “I commend all those who have collaborated on the organization of this new program, and we’re looking forward to its successful launch.”

Other events open to students, faculty and the general public during Heritage Week include:

12:50 to 2:15 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, Taylor Hall, Room 115k — Panel discussion about the recent critically acclaimed film “Selma,” moderated by Monroe Little, associate professor of Africana studies and history.
6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10, Taylor Hall, Room 101 — A public reception with an Evening of Jazz performed by Bryan Thompson.
1:15 to 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11, Taylor Hall, Room 104 — The lecture “Negotiating Patriarchy, Colonial Legacies and Human Rights Law in Africa” by Obioma Nnaemeka, Chancellor’s professor of French, Africana studies and women’s studies;
Noon to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12, Taylor Hall, Room 104 — A lecture by Ronda Henry Anthony about her book, “Searching for the New Black Man, Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies.”
10 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb. 13, Taylor Hall, Room 115K — Viewing of the film “Honor & Glory,” the story of the co-discoverer of the North Pole, Matthew Henson.

Additional sponsors for the weeklong event include the IUPUI Office of Admissions; the IU School of Liberal Arts; Office for Diversity, Access, and Inclusion; Multicultural Center, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development.

The first annual Africana Studies Heritage Week is free and open to the public. A complete listing of events is available online.

For more information, call the Africana studies program at 317-274-8662.